31

What is the best way to convert a variable length hex string e.g. "01A1" to a byte array containing that data.

i.e converting this:

std::string = "01A1";

into this

char* hexArray;
int hexLength;

or this

std::vector<char> hexArray;

so that when I write this to a file and hexdump -C it I get the binary data containing 01A1.

  • 13
    @alexvii That is not an answer to this question. – dhavenith Jun 23 '13 at 14:40
  • 2
    You can set std::streams to hex mode for reading and writing numbers in hex format – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 23 '13 at 14:45
  • @makulik I did try using streams and std::hex but couldn't get anything to work. Could you maybe show me an example? Thanks. – oracal Jun 23 '13 at 16:47
  • I don't think any ascii deduction is required, simply use the c api to convert into char array, unless i have gotten question wrong. I have pointed out the api in my ans below stackoverflow.com/a/17273020/986760. – fayyazkl Jun 24 '13 at 10:22

17 Answers 17

26

This ought to work:

int char2int(char input)
{
  if(input >= '0' && input <= '9')
    return input - '0';
  if(input >= 'A' && input <= 'F')
    return input - 'A' + 10;
  if(input >= 'a' && input <= 'f')
    return input - 'a' + 10;
  throw std::invalid_argument("Invalid input string");
}

// This function assumes src to be a zero terminated sanitized string with
// an even number of [0-9a-f] characters, and target to be sufficiently large
void hex2bin(const char* src, char* target)
{
  while(*src && src[1])
  {
    *(target++) = char2int(*src)*16 + char2int(src[1]);
    src += 2;
  }
}

Depending on your specific platform there's probably also a standard implementation though.

  • While that does seem to work (can't try it out atm) is there a more standard way? – oracal Jun 23 '13 at 16:45
  • I am not sure, the original string has the same elements, why do we need to covert to ascii to get numerical equivalent? – fayyazkl Jun 24 '13 at 10:20
  • @fayyazkl I don't understand what you mean? – Niels Keurentjes Jun 24 '13 at 10:30
  • @NielsKeurentjes What is wrong with using c_str() for the above? Why do we have to manually convert an ascii 'A' to hex A and put in target char *. What you did is correct. I just can't see why you have to manually do it when there is standard api available to covert string to char array. – fayyazkl Jun 24 '13 at 10:34
  • 2
    @fayyazkl you misunderstood the question - this is about converting the human-readable 4-character string "01A1" into 2 in memory bytes (1 and 161). Hence ASCII conversion is obviously required. – Niels Keurentjes Jun 24 '13 at 10:35
22

This implementation uses the built-in strtol function to handle the actual conversion from text to bytes, but will work for any even-length hex string.

std::vector<char> HexToBytes(const std::string& hex) {
  std::vector<char> bytes;

  for (unsigned int i = 0; i < hex.length(); i += 2) {
    std::string byteString = hex.substr(i, 2);
    char byte = (char) strtol(byteString.c_str(), NULL, 16);
    bytes.push_back(byte);
  }

  return bytes;
}
  • well you can always pre-append '0' to for odd sized hex string – user482963 Apr 23 '18 at 7:32
7

So for fun, I was curious if I could do this kind of conversion at compile-time. It doesn't have a lot of error checking and was done in VS2015, which doesn't support C++14 constexpr functions yet (thus how HexCharToInt looks). It takes a c-string array, converts pairs of characters into a single byte and expands those bytes into a uniform initialization list used to initialize the T type provided as a template parameter. T could be replaced with something like std::array to automatically return an array.

#include <cstdint>
#include <initializer_list>
#include <stdexcept>
#include <utility>

/* Quick and dirty conversion from a single character to its hex equivelent */
constexpr std::uint8_t HexCharToInt(char Input)
{
    return
    ((Input >= 'a') && (Input <= 'f'))
    ? (Input - 87)
    : ((Input >= 'A') && (Input <= 'F'))
    ? (Input - 55)
    : ((Input >= '0') && (Input <= '9'))
    ? (Input - 48)
    : throw std::exception{};
}

/* Position the characters into the appropriate nibble */
constexpr std::uint8_t HexChar(char High, char Low)
{
    return (HexCharToInt(High) << 4) | (HexCharToInt(Low));
}

/* Adapter that performs sets of 2 characters into a single byte and combine the results into a uniform initialization list used to initialize T */
template <typename T, std::size_t Length, std::size_t ... Index>
constexpr T HexString(const char (&Input)[Length], const std::index_sequence<Index...>&)
{
    return T{HexChar(Input[(Index * 2)], Input[((Index * 2) + 1)])...};
}

/* Entry function */
template <typename T, std::size_t Length>
constexpr T HexString(const char (&Input)[Length])
{
    return HexString<T>(Input, std::make_index_sequence<(Length / 2)>{});
}

constexpr auto Y = KS::Utility::HexString<std::array<std::uint8_t, 3>>("ABCDEF");
  • 3
    I upvoted because you had fun doing this. – Marco A. Nov 28 '16 at 21:01
  • 1
    Fantastic! I wanted a way of initializing an array from a string literal, and this is almost exactly what I need. – Martin Bonner Jun 2 '17 at 9:41
4

If you want to use OpenSSL to do it, there is a nifty trick I found:

BIGNUM *input = BN_new();
int input_length = BN_hex2bn(&input, argv[2]);
input_length = (input_length + 1) / 2; // BN_hex2bn() returns number of hex digits
unsigned char *input_buffer = (unsigned char*)malloc(input_length);
retval = BN_bn2bin(input, input_buffer);

Just be sure to strip off any leading '0x' to the string.

3

You said "variable length." Just how variable do you mean?

For hex strings that fit into an unsigned long I have always liked the C function strtoul. To make it convert hex pass 16 as the radix value.

Code might look like:

#include <cstdlib>
std::string str = "01a1";
unsigned long val = strtoul(str.c_str(), 0, 16);
2

I would use a standard function like sscanf to read the string into an unsigned integer, and then you already have the bytes you need in memory. If you were on a big endian machine you could just write out (memcpy) the memory of the integer from the first non-zero byte. However you can't safely assume this in general, so you can use some bit masking and shifting to get the bytes out.

const char* src = "01A1";
char hexArray[256] = {0};
int hexLength = 0;

// read in the string
unsigned int hex = 0;
sscanf(src, "%x", &hex);

// write it out
for (unsigned int mask = 0xff000000, bitPos=24; mask; mask>>=8, bitPos-=8) {
    unsigned int currByte = hex & mask;
    if (currByte || hexLength) {
        hexArray[hexLength++] = currByte>>bitPos;
    }
}
2
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>

int main() {
    std::string s("313233");
    char delim = ',';
    int len = s.size();
    for(int i = 2; i < len; i += 3, ++len) s.insert(i, 1, delim);
    std::istringstream is(s);
    std::ostringstream os;
    is >> std::hex;
    int n;
    while (is >> n) {
        char c = (char)n;
        os << std::string(&c, 1);
        if(is.peek() == delim) is.ignore();
    }

    // std::string form
    std::string byte_string = os.str();
    std::cout << byte_string << std::endl;
    printf("%s\n", byte_string.c_str());

    // std::vector form
    std::vector<char> byte_vector(byte_string.begin(), byte_string.end());
    byte_vector.push_back('\0'); // needed for a c-string
    printf("%s\n", byte_vector.data());
}

The output is

123
123
123

'1' == 0x31, etc.

2

This can be done with a stringstream, you just need to store the value in an intermediate numeric type such as an int:

  std::string test = "01A1"; // assuming this is an even length string
  char bytes[test.length()/2];
  stringstream converter;
  for(int i = 0; i < test.length(); i+=2)
  {
      converter << std::hex << test.substr(i,2);
      int byte;
      converter >> byte;
      bytes[i/2] = byte & 0xFF;
      converter.str(std::string());
      converter.clear();
  }
1

C++11 variant (with gcc 4.7 - little endian format):

    #include <string>
    #include <vector>

    std::vector<uint8_t> decodeHex(const std::string & source)
    {
        if ( std::string::npos != source.find_first_not_of("0123456789ABCDEFabcdef") )
        {
            // you can throw exception here
            return {};
        }

        union
        {
            uint64_t binary;
            char byte[8];
        } value{};

        auto size = source.size(), offset = (size % 16);
        std::vector<uint8_t> binary{};
        binary.reserve((size + 1) / 2);

        if ( offset )
        {
            value.binary = std::stoull(source.substr(0, offset), nullptr, 16);

            for ( auto index = (offset + 1) / 2; index--; )
            {
                binary.emplace_back(value.byte[index]);
            }
        }

        for ( ; offset < size; offset += 16 )
        {
            value.binary = std::stoull(source.substr(offset, 16), nullptr, 16);
            for ( auto index = 8; index--; )
            {
                binary.emplace_back(value.byte[index]);
            }
        }

        return binary;
    }

Crypto++ variant (with gcc 4.7):

#include <string>
#include <vector>

#include <crypto++/filters.h>
#include <crypto++/hex.h>

std::vector<unsigned char> decodeHex(const std::string & source)
{
    std::string hexCode;
    CryptoPP::StringSource(
              source, true,
              new CryptoPP::HexDecoder(new CryptoPP::StringSink(hexCode)));

    return std::vector<unsigned char>(hexCode.begin(), hexCode.end());
}

Note that the first variant is about two times faster than the second one and at the same time works with odd and even number of nibbles (the result of "a56ac" is {0x0a, 0x56, 0xac}). Crypto++ discards the last one if there are odd number of nibbels (the result of "a56ac" is {0xa5, 0x6a}) and silently skips invalid hex characters (the result of "a5sac" is {0xa5, 0xac}).

1

If your goal is speed, I have an AVX2 SIMD implementation of an encoder and decoder here: https://github.com/zbjornson/fast-hex. These benchmark ~12x faster than the fastest scalar implementations.

0

If you can make your data to look like this e.g array of "0x01", "0xA1" Then you can iterate your array and use sscanf to create the array of values

unsigned int result;
sscanf(data, "%x", &result);         
  • 2
    Is this a "hint" or an answer? And what do you mean by "try this"? Will it work? And is it different from the existing answers? How? – jogojapan Jun 24 '13 at 3:46
  • @jogojapan I am happy write the whole code do you really need it ? Can you see the difference in basic approach? – Anand Rathi Jun 24 '13 at 4:03
  • 2
    My problem is that I don't understand what you are trying to tell us. There is a hint, there is a string (followed by another version of that string with 0x prefixed), and then a very short statement about some iteration. The meaning of all this, esp. in the context of the existing answers, isn't clear to me. This will have an impact on upvotes/downvotes you'll get for this. – jogojapan Jun 24 '13 at 4:09
  • I'm not sure that the new version is ok. Doesn't sscanf take a pointer to unsigned int in this case, so passing a pointer to char could cause overflow? See, e.g., linux.die.net/man/3/sscanf: "x Matches an unsigned hexadecimal integer; the next pointer must be a pointer to unsigned int.". – TooTone Jun 24 '13 at 13:57
  • Thanks @tooTone for pointing that out. i just fixed it – Anand Rathi Jun 25 '13 at 8:54
0

The difficulty in an hex to char conversion is that the hex digits work pairwise, f.ex: 3132 or A0FF. So an even number of hex digits is assumed. However it could be perfectly valid to have an odd number of digits, like: 332 and AFF, which should be understood as 0332 and 0AFF.

I propose an improvement to Niels Keurentjes hex2bin() function. First we count the number of valid hex digits. As we have to count, let's control also the buffer size:

void hex2bin(const char* src, char* target, size_t size_target)
{
    int countdgts=0;    // count hex digits
    for (const char *p=src; *p && isxdigit(*p); p++) 
        countdgts++;                            
    if ((countdgts+1)/2+1>size_target)
        throw exception("Risk of buffer overflow"); 

By the way, to use isxdigit() you'll have to #include <cctype>.
Once we know how many digits, we can determine if the first one is the higher digit (only pairs) or not (first digit not a pair).

bool ishi = !(countdgts%2);         

Then we can loop digit by digit, combining each pair using bin shift << and bin or, and toggling the 'high' indicator at each iteration:

    for (*target=0; *src; ishi = !ishi)  {    
        char tmp = char2int(*src++);    // hex digit on 4 lower bits
        if (ishi)
            *target = (tmp << 4);   // high:  shift by 4
        else *target++ |= tmp;      // low:  complete previous  
    } 
  *target=0;    // null terminated target (if desired)
}
0

I found this question, but the accepted answer didn't look like a C++ way of solving the task to me (this doesn't mean it's a bad answer or anything, just explaining motivation behind adding this one). I recollected this nice answer and decided to implement something similar. Here is complete code of what I ended up with (it also works for std::wstring):

#include <cctype>
#include <cstdlib>

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <ostream>
#include <stdexcept>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

template <typename OutputIt>
class hex_ostream_iterator :
    public std::iterator<std::output_iterator_tag, void, void, void, void>
{
    OutputIt out;
    int digitCount;
    int number;

public:
    hex_ostream_iterator(OutputIt out) : out(out), digitCount(0), number(0)
    {
    }

    hex_ostream_iterator<OutputIt> &
    operator=(char c)
    {
        number = (number << 4) | char2int(c);
        digitCount++;

        if (digitCount == 2) {
            digitCount = 0;
            *out++ = number;
            number = 0;
        }
        return *this;
    }

    hex_ostream_iterator<OutputIt> &
    operator*()
    {
        return *this;
    }

    hex_ostream_iterator<OutputIt> &
    operator++()
    {
        return *this;
    }

    hex_ostream_iterator<OutputIt> &
    operator++(int)
    {
        return *this;
    }

private:
    int
    char2int(char c)
    {
        static const std::string HEX_CHARS = "0123456789abcdef";

        const char lowerC = std::tolower(c);
        const std::string::size_type pos = HEX_CHARS.find_first_of(lowerC);
        if (pos == std::string::npos) {
            throw std::runtime_error(std::string("Not a hex digit: ") + c);
        }
        return pos;
    }
};

template <typename OutputIt>
hex_ostream_iterator<OutputIt>
hex_iterator(OutputIt out)
{
    return hex_ostream_iterator<OutputIt>(out);
}

template <typename InputIt, typename OutputIt>
hex_ostream_iterator<OutputIt>
from_hex_string(InputIt first, InputIt last, OutputIt out)
{
    if (std::distance(first, last) % 2 == 1) {
        *out = '0';
        ++out;
    }
    return std::copy(first, last, out);
}

int
main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    if (argc != 2) {
        std::cout << "Usage: " << argv[0] << " hexstring" << std::endl;
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    const std::string input = argv[1];
    std::vector<unsigned char> bytes;
    from_hex_string(input.begin(), input.end(),
                    hex_iterator(std::back_inserter(bytes)));

    typedef std::ostream_iterator<unsigned char> osit;
    std::copy(bytes.begin(), bytes.end(), osit(std::cout));

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

And the output of ./hex2bytes 61a062a063 | hexdump -C:

00000000  61 a0 62 a0 63                                    |a.b.c|
00000005

And of ./hex2bytes 6a062a063 | hexdump -C (note odd number of characters):

00000000  06 a0 62 a0 63                                    |..b.c|
00000005
  • very nice char2int() ! But I fear that the result doesn't meet expectations when with odd number of hex digits. For example, try with 6a062a063. I'd understand 6 a0 62 a0 63, but your code makes 6a 06 2a 06 3 out of it. – Christophe Jun 20 '14 at 20:40
  • 1
    You're right about odd number of hex digits, @Christophe. Thank you! I updated the code to handle such case well (by the way, it's not true for the accepted answer, still better to handle such strings). – xaizek Jun 21 '14 at 10:53
  • It should be noted that I wrote the accepted answer as the most performant full solution to the OP's question :) No questions were asked about exceptional cases, so I assumed (like many stdc functions do) pre-sanitized input. – Niels Keurentjes Jul 19 '15 at 7:15
0

In: "303132", Out: "012". Input string can be odd or even length.

char char2int(char input)
{
    if (input >= '0' && input <= '9')
        return input - '0';
    if (input >= 'A' && input <= 'F')
        return input - 'A' + 10;
    if (input >= 'a' && input <= 'f')
        return input - 'a' + 10;

    throw std::runtime_error("Incorrect symbol in hex string");
};

string hex2str(string &hex)
{
    string out;
    out.resize(hex.size() / 2 + hex.size() % 2);

    string::iterator it = hex.begin();
    string::iterator out_it = out.begin();
    if (hex.size() % 2 != 0) {
        *out_it++ = char(char2int(*it++));
    }

    for (; it < hex.end() - 1; it++) {
        *out_it++ = char2int(*it++) << 4 | char2int(*it);
    };

    return out;
}
0
#include <iostream>

using byte = unsigned char;

static int charToInt(char c) {
    if (c >= '0' && c <= '9') {
        return c - '0';
    }
    if (c >= 'A' && c <= 'F') {
        return c - 'A' + 10;
    }
    if (c >= 'a' && c <= 'f') {
        return c - 'a' + 10;
    }
    return -1;
}

// Decodes specified HEX string to bytes array. Specified nBytes is length of bytes
// array. Returns -1 if fails to decode any of bytes. Returns number of bytes decoded
// on success. Maximum number of bytes decoded will be equal to nBytes. It is assumed
// that specified string is '\0' terminated.
int hexStringToBytes(const char* str, byte* bytes, int nBytes) {
    int nDecoded {0};
    for (int i {0}; str[i] != '\0' && nDecoded < nBytes; i += 2, nDecoded += 1) {
        if (str[i + 1] != '\0') {
            int m {charToInt(str[i])};
            int n {charToInt(str[i + 1])};
            if (m != -1 && n != -1) {
                bytes[nDecoded] = (m << 4) | n;
            } else {
                return -1;
            }
        } else {
            return -1;
        }
    }
    return nDecoded;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    if (argc < 2) {
        return 1;
    }

    byte bytes[0x100];
    int ret {hexStringToBytes(argv[1], bytes, 0x100)};
    if (ret < 0) {
        return 1;
    }
    std::cout << "number of bytes: " << ret << "\n" << std::hex;
    for (int i {0}; i < ret; ++i) {
        if (bytes[i] < 0x10) {
            std::cout << "0";
        }
        std::cout << (bytes[i] & 0xff);
    }
    std::cout << "\n";

    return 0;
}
0

Very similar to some of the other answers here, this is what I went with:

typedef uint8_t BYTE;

BYTE* ByteUtils::HexStringToBytes(BYTE* HexString, int ArrayLength)
{
  BYTE* returnBytes;
  returnBytes = (BYTE*) malloc(ArrayLength/2);
  int j=0;

  for(int i = 0; i < ArrayLength; i++)
  {
    if(i % 2 == 0)
    {
      int valueHigh = (int)(*(HexString+i));
      int valueLow =  (int)(*(HexString+i+1));

      valueHigh = ByteUtils::HexAsciiToDec(valueHigh);
      valueLow =  ByteUtils::HexAsciiToDec(valueLow);

      valueHigh *= 16;
      int total = valueHigh + valueLow;
      *(returnBytes+j++) = (BYTE)total;
    }
  }
  return returnBytes;
}

int ByteUtils::HexAsciiToDec(int value)
{
  if(value > 47 && value < 59)
  {
    value -= 48;
  }
  else if(value > 96 && value < 103)
  {
    value -= 97;
    value += 10;
  }
  else if(value > 64 && value < 71)
  {
    value -= 65;
    value += 10;
  }
  else
  {
    value = 0;
  }
  return value;
}
0

i've modified TheoretiCAL's code

uint8_t buf[32] = {};
std::string hex = "0123";
while (hex.length() % 2)
    hex = "0" + hex;
std::stringstream stream;
stream << std::hex << hex;

for (size_t i= 0; i <sizeof(buf); i++)
    stream >> buf[i];

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