2

I have a map with timeslots as a key, pointing to the assigned client. Not all timeslots have an assigned client, and it could be both a sparse and dense population, so I stuck with a map<int, int> implementation. A key exists only if an assignation exists.

A counter counts from slot 1 to slot x, and at each slot I check for the assignation.

e.g.

map<int, int> slot_info;

while (1)
{
    for (int i = 1; i =< 500; i++) //iterates through slots - 500 here as an example
    {
        map<int /*slot*/, int/*node*/>::iterator it = slot_info.find(i);

        if (it != slot_info.end())
        {
            int node = it->second;

            //find the next slot that is assigned to node
        }
    }
}

I need to do the following

  1. At slot X, check if there exists and assignation -> if yes, get node Y that was assigned
  2. Search map for the next slot after X that references Y.

Part 2 is the part I am unsure about - if Y is referenced at slot 480 (out of 500), and the next slot that references Y is slot 20 (I am running through the slot numbers in an infinite loop), then how do I get it to return 20?

My understanding of the map .begin() and '.end()` is that it is literal - i.e. it will not return 20 to me in this case as it would have reached the end.

  • What specifically is the problem you have? – poolie Jun 24 '13 at 6:56
  • @poolie " I have problems with looping back to the front of the map when it reaches the end" i.e. when I'm at slot 480, and the next assigned slot is 2, how do I find that? – sccs Jun 24 '13 at 6:57
  • 1
    Why does it need to "loop back": once you find a value, you keep going through your collection to find the second instance - you know it isn't before the first one (or else you'd have found it). No exactly sure what your asking... – John3136 Jun 24 '13 at 6:59
  • 2
    Style suggestion: Document your vector types. map<int /*slot*/, int /*client*/> slot_info. But your question is still unclear. Are you saying that you want to do something like find an entry that has index N -> Let C be the client referenced by that entry -> Find the first slot after N which also references client C? – kfsone Jun 24 '13 at 7:01
  • 1
    I think OP is looking for a way to implement some bimap. The first index (slot) is unique while the second (client) isn't. She wants to know how to get all the slots given a client. – Benjamin Bannier Jun 24 '13 at 7:03
0

I'm not entirely clear what the for(i in 0..500) is for, but if that's what you need to do:

#include <map>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

using std::map;

int main(int argc, const char** argv)
{
    map<int /*time*/, int /*client*/> slot_info;

    slot_info[123] = 1;
    slot_info[125] = 2;
    slot_info[480] = 3;
    slot_info[481] = 1;
    slot_info[482] = 3;

    for (int timeKey = 0; timeKey <= 500; ++timeKey) {
        auto it = slot_info.find(timeKey);
        if (it != slot_info.end()) {

            auto nextIt = ++it;
            nextIt = std::find_if(nextIt, slot_info.end(), [=] (const std::pair<int, int>& rhs) { return rhs.second == it->second; });
            if (nextIt != slot_info.end()) {
                std::cout << "found " << it->second << " with " << it->first << " and " << nextIt->first << std::endl;
            }
        }
    }
}

But it also seems more likely that you would probably want to just iterate across the map in the first place checking each value.

The second part of your question "My understanding of the map .begin() and '.end()` is that it is literal - i.e. it will not return 20 to me in this case as it would have reached the end."

"begin()" and "end()" are absolutes, irrespective of any current iterators you might have.

#include <map>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

using std::map;

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::pair<int, int>& item) {
    std::cout << "[" << item.first << "," << item.second << "]";
    return os;
}

int main(int argc, const char** argv)
{
    map<int /*time*/, int /*client*/> slot_info;

    slot_info[123] = 1;
    slot_info[125] = 2;
    slot_info[480] = 3;
    slot_info[481] = 1;
    slot_info[482] = 3;

    for (auto it = slot_info.begin(); it != slot_info.end(); ++it)
    {
        std::cout << "*it = " << *it << ", but *begin = " << *(slot_info.begin()) << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

So the other option you have is a - rather costly

for (int timeKey = 0; timeKey <= 500; ++timeKey) {
    auto firstIt = slot_info.find(i); // find a slot for this time.
    if (firstIt == slot_info.end())
        continue;
    auto secondIt = std::find(slot_info.begin(), slot_info.end(), [=](const std::pair<int, int>& rhs) { return firstIt->second == rhs.second && firstIt->first != rhs.first; });
    if ( secondIt != slot_info.end() ) {
        // we found a match
    }
}
0

Hold a reference to the place you originally found i.

If you get to the end of the map and you haven't found what you're looking for, go back to .start().

0

Why don't you just have another for loop inside?

PS:You are having while(1) but where is the break condition to come out?

 map<int, int> slot_info;

 while (1)
 {
  for (int i = 1; i =< 500; i++)
  {
    map<int, int>::iterator it = slot_info.find(i);

    if (it != slot_info.end())
    {
        int node = it->second;

        //find the next slot that is assigned to node
        for(map<int, int>::iterator it2 =++it;it2!=slot_info.end();it2++)
          if(it2->second==node)
          {
           //This is the next slot which refers to the same client
          }
    }
  }
 }
  • there is no break condition - it only stops when the program is terminated – sccs Jun 24 '13 at 7:32
0
// wrapper that performs a `find_if()` on two ranges, returning
//  an iterator to the first match found.
//
//  If no match is found, `last_2` is returned
template <typename InputIterator, typename Predicate>
InputIterator find_if_in_ranges(
                    InputIterator first_1, InputIterator last_1,
                    InputIterator first_2, InputIterator last_2,
                    Predicate pred)
{
    InputIterator ret = std::find_if( first_1, last_1, pred);

    if (ret == last_1) {
        ret = std::find_if( first_2, last_2, pred);
    }

    return ret;
}

Call the above with two ranges:

  • it + 1 and slot_info.end()
  • slot_info.begin() and it

and pass in a predicate which compares the second member of the pair a map<> iterator refers to. You can use a functor or function pointer as the predicate if you're using C++03, or use a lambda if you're using C++11.

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