7

I have 2 decimal values: a and b. How do I use bit operator to check if two value is same sign?

4
  • 2
    Decimal.GetBits()[31] == OtherDecimal.GetBits()[31]..MSDN Source
    – Sayse
    Jun 24, 2013 at 9:13
  • @Sayse, after reading the documentation you've linked you'll see that GetBits actually returns 4 integers, not 32.
    – Jodrell
    Jun 24, 2013 at 9:33
  • @Jodrell - I posted hastily moreover to show the msdn link, I put as a comment as I hadn't tested it :) I believe your answer came from the bottom vb example there :)
    – Sayse
    Jun 24, 2013 at 9:35
  • @RajeevKumar: yes, that I mean
    – TPL
    Jun 25, 2013 at 3:32

5 Answers 5

11

You can use Math.Sign(). When you use Math.Sign(x), if x is negative it returns -1 else if its positive, the function returns 1 or when its 0 it returns 0. So :

if(Math.Sign(a) == Math.Sign(b))
{
    // Code when sign matched.
}
else
{
    // Code when sign not matched.
}
3
  • I have one question, behind the Sign method, does it use the bit to check?
    – TPL
    Jun 24, 2013 at 10:39
  • I don't know if the Math.Sign() method uses bit to check or not. Its a .NET inbuilt function. You may try to disassemble the function to check.
    – Writwick
    Jun 24, 2013 at 12:06
  • Check dnSpy. It's great decompiling tool
    – dr4cul4
    Apr 21, 2017 at 13:30
3

Do you mean if both are positive or both are negative?

bool bothSameSign = (d1 >= 0 && d2 >= 0) || (d1 < 0 && d2 < 0);
2
  • 3
    Slightly shorter: bool bothSameSign = ((d1 >= 0) == (d2 >= 0)); Jun 24, 2013 at 9:15
  • I want to use bit to compare, may you have another solution?
    – TPL
    Jun 24, 2013 at 10:35
1

I don't think you really need to use the bit operator for this, but if for some reason you must (e.g. this is a school question):

Firstly you can use Decimal.GetBits() get all the bits in the two Decimals to compare, as an array of 4 ints.

Then you can inspect the sign bit which is at bit 31 in the int at offset 3 in the array of ints.

Decimal d1 = 1;
Decimal d2 = -1;

var bits1 = Decimal.GetBits(d1);
var bits2 = Decimal.GetBits(d2);

const int signMask = 1 << 31;
const int signWord = 3;

bool sameSign = ((bits1[signWord] & signMask) == (bits2[signWord] & signMask));
1
  • Actually I improve performance of code, so I look up the best solution to solve the same sign(positive and negative)
    – TPL
    Jun 24, 2013 at 10:38
1

You could make,

static int Sign(this decimal value)
{
    return Decimal.GetBits(value)[3] & 0x8000;
}

and do

a.Sign == b.Sign;
0

Bitwise shift is required for the sign-checking you want to accomplish:

if ( ( number >> sizeof(byte) * sizeof(numberType) -1 ) & 1)
{ /* < 0 */ }
else
{ /* >= 0 */ }

// you can of course use magic numbers 
// example for int: if ( ( number >> 31 ) & 1) { /* < 0 */ }

Problem is, you can't bitshift a decimal. You would have to do something like this:

var shiftableNumber = Int.Parse(Math.Truncate(yourDecimal));

I can't verify it, but I suspect it would defeat the purpose of optimizing through bitwise operators. You might aswell use the builtin Math.Sign() directly.

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