62

I sometimes have to write something like

from blqblq.lqlqlqlq.bla import fobarbazbarbarbazar as foo
from matplotlib.backends.backend_qt4agg import FigureCanvasQTAgg as FigureCanvas

which takes more than 80 characters. This situation is not covered in the official Python coding style guide. How do I write such imports pythonically?

0

2 Answers 2

63

http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/#maximum-line-length

The Python standard library is conservative and requires limiting lines to 79 characters (and docstrings/comments to 72).

The preferred way of wrapping long lines is by using Python's implied line continuation inside parentheses, brackets and braces. Long lines can be broken over multiple lines by wrapping expressions in parentheses. These should be used in preference to using a backslash for line continuation.

So in your case this could be:

from blqblq.lqlqlqlq.bla import (
                                 fobarbazbarbarbazar
                                 as foo)
from matplotlib.backends.backend_qt4agg import (
                                                FigureCanvasQTAgg
                                                as FigureCanvas)

Personally I always use this style which I find more readable with long lines:

# Just 1 indent
from blqblq.lqlqlqlq.bla import (
    fobarbazbarbarbazar
    as foo
) # end at the next line so it's always clear where what ends

from matplotlib.backends.backend_qt4agg import (
    FigureCanvasQTAgg as FigureCanvas
)
4
  • Your second example violates the rule that the new line shall begin under the opening parentheses. Is this an acceptable compromise and how do you decide where to continue the line.
    – Vorac
    Jun 24, 2013 at 11:09
  • That was an error while indenting on my part actually, officially you should be able to do it without (unless you have words that are longer than 80 characters, but in that case you're probably doing something wrong anyhow).
    – Wolph
    Jun 24, 2013 at 11:23
  • 1
    The source you cited actually contradicts your quote block on breaks around binary operators: In PEP8, the preferred line break is before a binary operator, not after it, tho both are considered acceptable.
    – RBF06
    May 30, 2019 at 14:23
  • 1
    @RBF06: PEP8 has had a few improvements and modifications since I wrote this 6 years ago, I'll update it a bit :)
    – Wolph
    May 30, 2019 at 16:28
29

This is the PEP8 documentation for long imports:

Currently, if you want to import a lot of names from a module or package, you have to choose one of several unpalatable options:

Write a long line with backslash continuations:

from Tkinter import Tk, Frame, Button, Entry, Canvas, Text, \
     LEFT, DISABLED, NORMAL, RIDGE, END 

Write multiple import statements:

from Tkinter import Tk, Frame, Button, Entry, Canvas, Text 
from Tkinter import LEFT, DISABLED, NORMAL, RIDGE, END 

( import * is not an option ;-)

Instead, it should be possible to use Python's standard grouping mechanism (parentheses) to write the import statement:

from Tkinter import (Tk, Frame, Button, Entry, Canvas, Text,
    LEFT, DISABLED, NORMAL, RIDGE, END) 

This part of the proposal had BDFL approval from the beginning.

Parentheses support was added to Python 2.4.

1
  • 2
    "This is the PEP8 documentation ..." The link at the top goes to PEP 0328. Did the quoted language originally live in PEP8?
    – Bob Kline
    Jan 14, 2021 at 23:38

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