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I'm using the sgemm function in the Intel MKL library to multiply large matrices on Intel CPUs.

I have a unit test which takes a set of data and runs the data through various algorithms. It has been proven that between passes with this set of data, if sgemm isn't used (a non-optimised algorithm is used instead that someone wrote at my company) the results are completely identical.

We're getting inconsistent results with the least significant digit in the matrices returned by the function. This error can be then compounded by the type of algorithms that we use.

I've avoided the significance of the effect by switching to dgemm and using double precision values rather than single. However I'm still interested in what could cause this inconsistency and why multiplying the matrix (with our own unoptimised algorithm) doesn't cause this problem.

My current thoughts are when multiplying matrices, the floating point multiplication could be executed out of order and because these floating point operations aren't associative, we get subtly different values.

  • 1
    Presumably your unoptimised SGEMM involves nested loops? If you're using the Intel compiler, try #pragma simd the innermost loop and see if the result changes. This page software.intel.com/sites/products/documentation/doclib/iss/2013/… seems to suggest that Intel's SIMD instructions don't necessarily respect strict floating point standard. And the MKL SGEMM most definitely employs SSE/AVX instructions. – Saran Jun 24 '13 at 14:55
  • Unfortunately I'm not using Intel's compiler right now...I'll extract the code and run it with Intel's compiler to see if SIMD is responsible. – Alex Jun 24 '13 at 15:34
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    You could compare to Eigen. It's very easy to use and free. It uses SSE and is about as good as MKL on SSE only machines (MKL is faster for machines with AVX. – user2088790 Jun 25 '13 at 11:04
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I've gotten interested in this and wrote a bit of code to test the hypothesis myself, and it does seem that SIMD gives different results compared to "standard mode".

The following snippet was compiled with ICC 13.0.2 on Mac OS X 10.8.3 using icpc -std=c++11 -O3 -ip -xAVX -fp-model source -fp-model precise -mkl=parallel -openmp.

#include <cmath>
#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>
#include <random>
#include <utility>

#include <immintrin.h>
#include <mkl.h>

template <typename type, size_t rows, size_t cols>
class matrix
{
private:
    void *_data;

public:
    matrix() :
        _data (_mm_malloc(sizeof(type) * rows * cols, 64))
    {
        if (_data == nullptr) throw std::bad_alloc();
        else memset(_data, 0, sizeof(type) * rows * cols);
    }

    matrix(matrix<type, rows, cols> const& other) :
        _data (_mm_malloc(sizeof(type) * rows * cols, 64))
    {
        if (_data == nullptr) throw std::bad_alloc();
        else memcpy(_data, other._data, sizeof(type) * rows * cols);
    }

    ~matrix()
    {
        if (_data != nullptr) _mm_free(_data);
    }

    typedef type array_type[cols];
    array_type& operator[](size_t i)
    {
        return static_cast<array_type*>(_data)[i];
    }

    typedef type const_array_type[cols];
    const_array_type& operator[](size_t i) const
    {
        return static_cast<const_array_type*>(_data)[i];
    }
};

template <typename type, size_t m, size_t n>
type max_diff(matrix<type, m, n> const& a, matrix<type, m, n> const& b)
{
    type value = static_cast<type>(0);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < m; ++i)
    {
        #pragma novector
        for (size_t j = 0; j < n; ++j)
        {
            const type diff = a[i][j] - b[i][j];
            if (std::abs(diff) > value) value = std::abs(diff);
        }
    }
    return value;
}

template <typename type, size_t m, size_t n, size_t k>
matrix<type, m, n> matmul_loop(matrix<type, m, k> const& a, matrix<type, n, k> const& b)
{
    matrix<type, m, n> out;

    #pragma omp parallel for
    for (size_t i = 0; i < m; ++i)
    {
        for (size_t j = 0; j < n; ++j)
        {
            for (size_t l = 0; l < k; ++l)
            {
                out[i][j] += a[i][l] * b[j][l];
            }
        }
    }

    return out;
}

template <typename type, size_t m, size_t n, size_t k>
matrix<type, m, n> matmul_simd(matrix<type, m, k> const& a, matrix<type, n, k> const& b)
{
    matrix<type, m, n> out;
    type *temp = static_cast<type*>(_mm_malloc(sizeof(type) * k, 64));

    #pragma omp parallel for
    for (size_t i = 0; i < m; ++i)
    {
        for (size_t j = 0; j < n; ++j)
        {
            type temp = 0.;

            #pragma vector aligned
            #pragma ivdep
            #pragma simd vectorlengthfor(type)
            for (size_t l = 0; l < k; ++l)
            {
                temp += a[i][l] * b[j][l];
            }

            out[i][j] = temp;
        }
    }

    return out;
}

template <size_t m, size_t n, size_t k>
matrix<float, m, n> matmul_sgemm(matrix<float, m, k> const& a, matrix<float, n, k> const& b)
{
    matrix<float, m, n> out;
    cblas_sgemm(CblasRowMajor, CblasNoTrans, CblasTrans, m, n, k, 1., &a[0][0], m, &b[0][0], n, 0., &out[0][0], m);
    return out;
}

int main()
{
    std::mt19937_64 generator;
    std::uniform_real_distribution<float> rand_dist(-1000.0,1000.0);

    const size_t size = 4096;

    matrix<float, size, size> mat;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < size; ++i)
    {
        for (size_t j = 0; j < size; ++j)
        {
            mat[i][j] = rand_dist(generator);
        }
    }

    matrix<float, size, size> result_loop = matmul_loop(mat, mat);
    matrix<float, size, size> result_simd = matmul_simd(mat, mat);
    matrix<float, size, size> result_sgemm = matmul_sgemm(mat, mat);

    std::cout << "SIMD differs from LOOP by a maximum of " << max_diff(result_loop, result_simd) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "SGEMM differs from LOOP by a maximum of " << max_diff(result_loop, result_sgemm) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "SGEMM differs from SIMD by a maximum of " << max_diff(result_simd, result_sgemm) << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Note that the "random" matrix was generated using a standard seed so the result should be completely reproducible. Basically, given a 4096x4096 matrix A, the code computes AAT using three different methods and then compare the results, printing out the component which differs by the largest amount. On my machine, the output is as follows:

$ ./matmul
SIMD differs from LOOP by a maximum of 6016
SGEMM differs from LOOP by a maximum of 6016
SGEMM differs from SIMD by a maximum of 512

The compiler flag -fp-model source -fp-model precise prevents matmul_loop from being vectorised, but the loop in matmul_simd was obviously forced to be vectorised #pragma simd. The matrix transpose is there just to help simplify the SIMD code a little.

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