63

This question comes from a comment under Range.Formula= in VBA throws a strange error.

I wrote that program by trial-and-error so I naturally tried + to concatenate strings.

But is & more correct than + for concatenating strings?

123

& is always evaluated in a string context, while + may not concatenate if one of the operands is no string:

"1" + "2" => "12"
"1" + 2   => 3
1 + "2"   => 3
"a" + 2   => type mismatch

This is simply a subtle source of potential bugs and therefore should be avoided. & always means "string concatenation", even if its arguments are non-strings:

"1" & "2" => "12"
"1" &  2  => "12"
 1  & "2" => "12"
 1  &  2  => "12"
"a" &  2  => "a2"
  • what about for a 2 digit integer? like 13 & "2"? would that be 132? – Adjit Nov 24 '14 at 15:28
  • 4
    @adjit: Yes, it would. By the way, you can easily test that. – Joey Nov 24 '14 at 15:43
2

The main (very interesting) difference for me is that:
"string" & Null -> "string"
while
"string" + Null -> Null

But that's probably more useful in database apps like Access.

0

There is the concatenate function. For example

=CONCATENATE(E2,"-",F2)
But the & operator always concatenates strings. + often will work, but if there is a number in one of the cells, it won't work as expected.

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