4

Out of curiosity was looking at the lock keyword on MSDN :

class Account
{
    decimal balance;
    private Object thisLock = new Object();

    public void Withdraw(decimal amount)
    {
        lock (thisLock)
        {
            if (amount > balance)
            {
                throw new Exception("Insufficient funds");
            }
            balance -= amount;
        }
    }
}

In the example above the object thisLock is used with the lock keyword. Why is this needed? It doesnt seem to have any other purpose. Why not just have the lock keyword by itself?

  • 1
    The lock keyword by itself would be invalid C#. Are you thinking of lock(this) { ... }? – Jon Skeet Jun 24 '13 at 15:23
  • 1
    I suppose theoretically, the C# language/compiler could allow syntax like lock() which would handle a unique object for that particular lock. But would raise a few usability questions, for example: is that lock static or instance level? Not to mention make it super-easy to accidentally not share locks where you accidentally put lock() instead of lock(mySharedSyncObject). Easier to avoid it altogether and just put the onus on us to apply our locking intent. – Chris Sinclair Jun 24 '13 at 15:30
  • @ChrisSinclair your answer gives me what I was looking for. Thanks. – sprocket12 Jun 24 '13 at 15:35
  • 1
    Think of lock as locking a door. Which door is being locked? is a relevant question, no? – Eric Lippert Jun 24 '13 at 16:28
0

The object used for locking isn't redundant. The object acts as a token, which is used to implement a simple synchronization protocol: Whoever holds the lock is granted access to the locked code. All others have to wait until the lock is released.

Without an object it would not be possible to have different tokens and all synchronization would rely on a single internal token. That would not be very effective.

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4

lock keyword cannot exist on it's own, it always takes a parameter which will act as a semaphore (synchronizing object), allowing only one thread to proceed.

http://www.albahari.com/threading/part2.aspx#_Locking

Only one thread can lock the synchronizing object (in this case, thisLock) at a time, and any contending threads are blocked until the lock is released. If more than one thread contends the lock, they are queued on a “ready queue” and granted the lock on a first-come, first-served basis (a caveat is that nuances in the behavior of Windows and the CLR mean that the fairness of the queue can sometimes be violated).

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  • Yes it is clear its some sort of single point of reference, but I was just confused as why the feature in the language needed the developer to instantiate an object for the job when it could be automatic/built in? So I was thinking maybe there was more to it. – sprocket12 Jun 24 '13 at 15:29
  • 2
    @MuhammadA That makes the assumption that ever single lock statement within a class will use the same object to lock on. That's a false assumption. While that is probably the most common operation, having different objects that you lock on (either determine dynamically, or statically) is also quite common. That's what makes lock very flexible. – Servy Jun 24 '13 at 15:31
  • 1
    For example, looking at the source code of ConcurrentDictionary, it uses a separate lock object for each section of the table. This allows simultaneous access to the dictionary (even when removing and adding objects), so long as those accesses are happening in different sections of the table. Sharing a locking object would mean only one operation could happen at a time. – Brian Jun 24 '13 at 15:39
0

There are several aspects here:

  • The lock statements needs an object reference as identifier. It has to have something that identifies this lock and separates it from any other locks that can exist in the code.

  • The data that you are protecting isn't a reference type, so you need something else to use as the identifier for the lock.

  • It's recommended to have a private object that is only used as identifier for the lock, even if it would be possible to use the data iself as identifier. That way there is no reason to ever expose the reference outside the class, as that would open up for possible deadlocks if it was used in a lock outside the class.

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