2

Edit

I've recorded a screencast with my problem, you can find it here, please look if you have time.

I have the following code that should perform AddOrUpdate functionality, but instead all existing records are recreated, so as a result I have several New Yorks, several USA's. I'm transferring EntityState from client, so that if data changed on client, the client updates EntityState property accordingly and sends it to server.

    [HttpPost, HttpGet, HttpPut]
    public HttpResponseMessage SaveRecord(RecordViewModel record)
    {
        var model = Mapper.Map<Record>(record);

        if (!ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ModelState);
        }

        db.Attach(model);

        try
        {
            db.SaveChanges();
        }
        catch (DbUpdateConcurrencyException ex)
        {
            return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotFound, ex);
        }

        return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, Mapper.Map<RecordViewModel>(model));
    }

I'm attaching entities with the following function

    public void AttachAndMarkAs<T>(T entity, EntityState state, Func<T, object> id) where T : class
    {
        var entry = Entry(entity);

        if (entry.State == EntityState.Detached)
        {
            var set = Set<T>();

            T attachedEntity = set.Find(id(entity));

            if (attachedEntity != null)
            {
                var attachedEntry = Entry(attachedEntity);

                if (state != EntityState.Unchanged)
                {
                    attachedEntry.CurrentValues.SetValues(entity);
                    attachedEntry.State = state;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                entry.State = state;
            }
        }
    }

Which is relayed via the following ones:

    public void Attach(City entity)
    {
        if (entity != null)
        {
            Attach(entity.Country);

            AttachAndMarkAs(entity, entity.EntityState ?? EntityState.Added, instance => instance.Id);
        }
    }

    public void Attach(Country entity)
    {
        if (entity != null)
        {
            AttachAndMarkAs(entity, entity.EntityState ?? EntityState.Added, instance => instance.Id);
        }
    }

I don't understand which part of the code handles Adding entities instead of Updating them, because the EntityState values are correct...

  • 1
    If you say "I don't understand which part does..." does that mean you copied the code from elsewhere? – Dave Williams Jun 24 '13 at 15:50
  • Your EntityState is null, therefore its always treating it as an Add. – Maess Jun 24 '13 at 15:54
  • Did you set some breakpoints and see what was happening? – MaxSC Jun 24 '13 at 16:01
  • As for "I don't understand", I understand what my code does, but I don't see a place which is responsible for adding entities – Lu4 Jun 24 '13 at 19:14
  • Regarding "EntityState is null", no it is not always null, it is null only for entities created on the client i.e new entities that not yet exist in database, other ones have either Unchanged or Modified state, but the problem is that Entity Framework doesn't care what entity state is assigned to entry's EntityState property, it just omits it and creates new entity. My guess is that inside AttachAndMarkAs method there is line var entry = Entry(entity); maybe somehow entity framework treats this line as a call for creation of new entity, or I don't know what other place may cause this... – Lu4 Jun 24 '13 at 19:20
3

If you are using a simple int for your id, you can use the following method.

public abstract class BaseEntity
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

public void AddOrUpdate<T> (T entity) where T : BaseEntity
{
   if(entity.Id > 0){
      Entry(entity).State = EntityState.Modified;
   }
   else
   {
      Set<T>().Add(entity);
   }
}

// 

var model = Mapper.Map<Record>(record);
db.AddOrUpdate(model);
db.SaveChanges();
| improve this answer | |
  • I think I've got it, I have the outer Entity which contains the child ones. The child ones are the 'Detached' properties that get created – Lu4 Jun 24 '13 at 21:19
3

You need to pay attention to how Entity Framework deal with child/referenced entities when you're changing the state of the parent entity programmatically.

Have a look at this article that summarizes how things are working in many different cases.

In the example below, you might think that all the referenced entities will automatically be set as Modifiied:

using (var context = new BloggingContext())
{
    context.Entry(existingBlog).State = EntityState.Modified;
    // Do some more work... 
    context.SaveChanges();
}

But actually, they won't. As written on the article:

If you have multiple entities that need to be marked Modified you should set the state for each of these entities individually.

Finally, here is the way you need to handle the AddOrUpdate specific case when your PrimaryKey is an Int:

using (var context = new BloggingContext())
{
   context.Entry(blog).State = blog.BlogId == 0 ? EntityState.Added : EntityState.Modified;

   context.SaveChanges();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • How does your example show the referenced entities remain in an unchanged state? – Charlie Brown Jun 25 '13 at 13:53
  • Sorry it was not clear, i've updated my answer. I took an example from there where they warn developers about the real behaviour of EntityState modification. – MaxSC Jun 25 '13 at 14:42
  • Thanks for the link, really helpful – Lu4 Jun 25 '13 at 14:59

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