75

When I try svn mv old_file_name new_file_name, I get

 svn: Path 'new_file_name' is not a directory

What's the correct way? (sorry, this seems so trivial, but I'm stuck).

PS. using svn version 1.6.11

EDIT it seems I get this error only if new_file_name refers to the name of a file that is currently under version control. In this case, of course, I can simply

 mv old_file_name new_file_name
 svn delete old_file_name
  • Maybe you need the full repository path, file://... or svn://... or http://... to the file. – ja72 Jun 24 '13 at 16:30
100

The behaviour differs depending on whether the target file name already exists or not. It's usually a safety mechanism, and there are at least 3 different cases:

Target file does not exist:

In this case svn mv should work as follows:

$ svn mv old_file_name new_file_name
A         new_file_name
D         old_file_name
$ svn stat
A  +    new_file_name
        > moved from old_file_name
D       old_file_name
        > moved to new_file_name
$ svn commit
Adding     new_file_name
Deleting   old_file_name
Committing transaction...

Target file already exists in repository:

In this case, the target file needs to be removed explicitly, before the source file can be renamed. This can be done in the same transaction as follows:

$ svn mv old_file_name new_file_name 
svn: E155010: Path 'new_file_name' is not a directory
$ svn rm new_file_name 
D         new_file_name
$ svn mv old_file_name new_file_name 
A         new_file_name
D         old_file_name
$ svn stat
R  +    new_file_name
        > moved from old_file_name
D       old_file_name
        > moved to new_file_name
$ svn commit
Replacing      new_file_name
Deleting       old_file_name
Committing transaction...

In the output of svn stat, the R indicates that the file has been replaced, and that the file has a history.

Target file already exists locally (unversioned):

In this case, the content of the local file would be lost. If that's okay, then the file can be removed locally before renaming the existing file.

$ svn mv old_file_name new_file_name 
svn: E155010: Path 'new_file_name' is not a directory
$ rm new_file_name 
$ svn mv old_file_name new_file_name 
A         new_file_name
D         old_file_name
$ svn stat
A  +    new_file_name
        > moved from old_file_name
D       old_file_name
        > moved to new_file_name
$ svn commit
Adding         new_file_name
Deleting       old_file_name
Committing transaction...
  • I needed to add --force to svn rm new_file_name as it complained that new_file is is not under version control. – Matthew Lock Jan 15 '14 at 1:30
  • .. and I had to create an empty file called new_file_name. – Matthew Lock Jan 15 '14 at 1:37
  • 4
    on 1.8.3 rm removes the physical file, just running the "svn mv ..." was sufficient, it executes that A D. – Sonic Soul May 28 '14 at 20:58
  • 2
    It is funny how old SVN is and how awkward it is to rename a file using it. – Ghasan Jul 12 '15 at 7:29
  • 1
    @Ghasan: The title of the question might be misleading. It's about removing one file and renaming another file at the same time. This use case is not that common, and a bit tricky with most VCS, in particular if the information should be visible in the history. – nosid Jul 12 '15 at 21:06
16

Using TortoiseSVN worked easily on Windows for me.

http://tortoisesvn.net/

Right click file -> TortoiseSVN menu -> Repo-browser -> right click file in repository -> rename -> press Enter -> click Ok

Using SVN 1.8.8 TortoiseSVN version 1.8.5

  • Not that the OP was asking about Windows, but upvotes deserve extension: Full desktop integration means that you may simply do this in the context menu from Explorer. – Barton Apr 8 '15 at 18:56
  • But now I see that posting a Windows answer on what is clearly a Linux question has gotten this one down-voted several time. (drats, time ran out for me to edit my original comment) – Barton Apr 8 '15 at 19:04
  • I was using Cygwin on Windows at the time, so there was some crossover. – storm_m2138 Jun 8 '15 at 15:07
  • I couldn't get it to work without using TortoiseSVN on Windows. So I am thankful for this answer. I upvoted you. Using anything else kept causing it to revert anytime I updated. In my case the change was capitalization of the file names. I think the issue in my case stems from the fact that Windows is case insensitive. – Jon Jul 14 '15 at 20:59
  • This worls, but you will lose the history of the file. – FokTheRock Jun 20 '17 at 8:31
4

This message will appear if you are using a case-insensitive file system (e.g. on a Mac) and you're trying to capitalize the name (or another change of case). In which case you need to rename to a third, dummy, name:

svn mv file-name file-name_
svn mv file-name_ FILE_Name
svn commit
0

It can be if you created new directory at the disk BEFORE create/commit it in the SVN. All that you need is just create it in SVN and do move after:

$ svn mv etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/cs/us0101ccs001.cfg etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs/
svn: E155010: Path '/home/dyr/svn/nagioscore/etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs' is not a directory

$ svn status
?       etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs

$ rm -rvf etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs
removed directory 'etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs'

$ svn mkdir etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs
A         etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs

$ svn move etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/cs/us0101ccs001.cfg etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs/us0101accs001.cfg
A         etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs/us0101accs001.cfg
D         etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/cs/us0101ccs001.cfg

$ svn status
A       etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs
A  +    etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs/us0101accs001.cfg
        > moved from etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/cs/us0101ccs001.cfg
D       etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/cs/us0101ccs001.cfg
        > moved to etc/nagios/hosts/us0101/ccs/us0101accs001.cfg
-3

You can do it by following 3 steps:

 - svn rm old_file_name
 - svn add new_file_name
 - svn commit
  • 3
    This approach is not good because it loses the file's history – user2913094 Mar 27 '16 at 22:59

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