18

I know that this is a question that has been discussed before but I have a situation that I don't understand.

I have the following projects

  • Project A
    • Project B
      • NuGet Package "log4net"
      • NuGet Package "ServerAppFabric.Client"

Project A has a visual studio reference to Project B. I'm using both packages in code in Project B and I am building in debug mode. Project B config looks like this.

<Reference Include="log4net">
  <HintPath>..\packages\log4net.2.0.0\lib\net40-full\log4net.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>
<Reference Include="Microsoft.ApplicationServer.Caching.Client">
  <HintPath>..\packages\ServerAppFabric.Client.1.1.2106\lib\Microsoft.ApplicationServer.Caching.Client.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>
<Reference Include="Microsoft.ApplicationServer.Caching.Core">
  <HintPath>..\packages\ServerAppFabric.Client.1.1.2106\lib\Microsoft.ApplicationServer.Caching.Core.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>

*Why is only the dll-file from log4net copied into the bin folder of Project A and not the Client and Core files? Any help or explanation is appreciated! *

4
  • Which are the target frameworks of ProjectA and ProjectB? Commented Jun 24, 2013 at 17:10
  • Both are using version 4.5 Commented Jun 25, 2013 at 8:16
  • Tried with some other framework configurations but the same problem. Could it be related to if the files already exit in gac? Commented Jun 25, 2013 at 9:40
  • Maybe. Let me create a solution on my machne and see if the same thing happens. Commented Jun 25, 2013 at 9:57

4 Answers 4

15

In order to answer your question precisely, we'd need to know a couple of things.

One explanation (1) depends on what references you have in Project A. For example, it could be that project A, other than referencing project B, also includes additional references, among which there are Microsoft.ApplicationServer.Caching.Client and Microsoft.ApplicationServer.Caching.Core, maybe with the option Copy local set to false - but not log4net. In this case, the copy of the former two will happen only for Project B.

Another possible explanation (2) depends on what your code does with the references in project A and project B. The MSBuild process does not automatically copy assemblies of references that are not actually used in a project.

Finally, in case you are relying on Build Events to copy references (3), have a look at the Output panel to make sure that there are no errors despite a successful compilation.

For case (1) and (2), in order to make sure that all NuGet packages are copied, I find it useful to edit the .csproj file and, among the <PropertyGroup> tag, add this:

<CopyLocalLockFileAssemblies>true</CopyLocalLockFileAssemblies>

From the documentation:

If you set this CopyLocalLockFileAssemblies to true, any NuGet package dependencies are copied to the output directory. That means you can use the output of dotnet build to run your plugin on any machine.

As per its documentation, <CopyLocalLockFileAssemblies> copies any explicitly linked NuGet dependency into the output directory of the project. It naturally follows that if you want Project A to have a copy of a NuGet dll in its output directory, but the Project A does not copy it because e.g. it falls in case (1) or (2) outlined above, then you should:

  • make sure the NuGet package is installed in Project A;
  • add <CopyLocalLockFileAssemblies> in Project A's csproj file.

This is not a silver bullet, i.e. it won't work if the error lies in e.g. the third case outlined above.

3
  • You didn't specify which project you would add the <CopyLocalLockFileAssemblies> to. Project A, project B or both?
    – Deantwo
    Commented Aug 16, 2023 at 7:23
  • 1
    As per its documentation, <CopyLocalLockFileAssemblies> copies any explicitly linked NuGet dependency into the output directory of the project. It naturally follows that if you want Project A to have a copy of a NuGet dll in its output directory, but the project does not copy it because e.g. it falls in one of the cases outlined in the answer, then an option can be: 1) Add an explicit NuGet reference to the desidered package to project A (install it there); 2) add <CopyLocalLockFileAssemblies> in Project A.
    – alelom
    Commented Aug 16, 2023 at 10:38
  • 1
    It works in .NET 8
    – Never.More
    Commented Apr 19 at 9:28
7

I had the same problem with a somehow complex dependency graph.

  1. Go to the Reference Properties and set Copy Local=True.
  2. Compile and check if the assembly was copied to the bin folder.
  3. If that doesn’t fix your issue try this answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/19889803/1074245
0
4

I don't think this is related to NuGet. It should be related to how references work in Visual Studio or MSBuild. If you just reference a library in ProjectB, it won't show up in ProjectA's bin folder. However, when you use some type from the referenced library,only then it will show up in bin folder.

0
0

I came here with exactly the problem mentioned above. Turns out I had renamed the assembly name of the package (because of a net upgrade and the original developer had put the framework name in the project name) and only installed it into project A and not project B which meant the package was not being copied to project B’s bin folder because the hint path had changed

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