17

I'd like to use the generate series function in redshift, but have not been successful.

The redshift documentation says it's not supported. The following code does work:

select *
from generate_series(1,10,1)

outputs:

1
2
3
...
10

I'd like to do the same with dates. I've tried a number of variations, including:

select *
from generate_series(date('2008-10-01'),date('2008-10-10 00:00:00'),1)

kicks out:

 ERROR: function generate_series(date, date, integer) does not exist
 Hint: No function matches the given name and argument types.
 You may need to add explicit type casts. [SQL State=42883]

Also tried:

select *
from generate_series('2008-10-01 00:00:00'::timestamp,
'2008-10-10 00:00:00'::timestamp,'1 day')

And tried:

select *
from generate_series(cast('2008-10-01 00:00:00' as datetime),
cast('2008-10-10 00:00:00' as datetime),'1 day')

both kick out:

ERROR: function generate_series(timestamp without time zone, timestamp without time zone, "unknown") does not exist
Hint: No function matches the given name and argument types.
You may need to add explicit type casts. [SQL State=42883]

If not looks like I'll use this code from another post:

SELECT to_char(DATE '2008-01-01'
+ (interval '1 month' * generate_series(0,57)), 'YYYY-MM-DD') AS ym

PostgreSQL generate_series() with SQL function as arguments

17

Amazon Redshift seems to be based on PostgreSQL 8.0.2. The timestamp arguments to generate_series() were added in 8.4.

Something like this, which sidesteps that problem, might work in Redshift.

SELECT current_date + (n || ' days')::interval
from generate_series (1, 30) n

It works in PostgreSQL 8.3, which is the earliest version I can test. It's documented in 8.0.26.

Later . . .

It seems that generate_series() is unsupported in Redshift. But given that you've verified that select * from generate_series(1,10,1) does work, the syntax above at least gives you a fighting chance. (Although the interval data type is also documented as being unsupported on Redshift.)

Still later . . .

You could also create a table of integers.

create table integers (
  n integer primary key
);

Populate it however you like. You might be able to use generate_series() locally, dump the table, and load it on Redshift. (I don't know; I don't use Redshift.)

Anyway, you can do simple date arithmetic with that table without referring directly to generate_series() or to interval data types.

select (current_date + n)
from integers
where n < 31;

That works in 8.3, at least.

  • 3
    +1 That seems to explain it. Less than impressive from amazon ... – Erwin Brandstetter Jun 24 '13 at 19:18
13

Using Redshift today, you can generate a range of dates by using datetime functions and feeding in a number table.

select (getdate()::date - generate_series)::date from generate_series(1,30,1)

Generates this for me

date
2015-11-06
2015-11-05
2015-11-04
2015-11-03
2015-11-02
2015-11-01
2015-10-31
2015-10-30
2015-10-29
2015-10-28
2015-10-27
2015-10-26
2015-10-25
2015-10-24
2015-10-23
2015-10-22
2015-10-21
2015-10-20
2015-10-19
2015-10-18
2015-10-17
2015-10-16
2015-10-15
2015-10-14
2015-10-13
2015-10-12
2015-10-11
2015-10-10
2015-10-09
2015-10-08
  • 5
    while this generates a series, I have found no way (CTE, subquery, or inserting into a table or temporary table to join it to another table for filtering). – cfeduke Jan 25 '16 at 18:06
  • 2
    @cfeduke you could wrap this into a temp table as with series AS ( select * from generate_series(1,10,1) ) select * from series – blotto Mar 31 '16 at 22:54
  • 1
    @blotto - thank you! Your comment and the last example in the question solved the problem for me. – GeekyDeaks Apr 20 '16 at 8:32
  • 10
    The query, with series AS ( select * from generate_series(1,10,1) ) select * from series, does work. However, as soon as join it with another table, with series AS ( select * from generate_series(1,10,1) ) select * from series join mytable on true, then I still get the error Function "generate_series(integer,integer,integer)" not supported. – Slobodan Pejic Apr 24 '17 at 16:21
6

The generate_series() function is not fully supported by Redshift. See the Unsupported PostgreSQL functions section of the developer guide.

UPDATE

generate_series is working with Redshift now.

SELECT CURRENT_DATE::TIMESTAMP  - (i * interval '1 day') as date_datetime 
FROM generate_series(1,31) i 
ORDER BY 1

This will generate last 30 days date

Ref: generate_series function in Amazon Redshift

  • It appears that generate_series() works occasionally, but reliably fails if and when used in queries joining to actual tables. My guess is that these example queries are running on the leader node and succeeding, but fail when running on other nodes. From your link to the unsupported functions docs: "some unsupported functions will not return an error when run on the leader node" – Ryan Tuck Feb 21 at 17:27
1

I needed to do something similar, but with 5 minutes intervals over 7 days. So here's a CTE based hack (ugly but not too verbose)

INSERT INTO five_min_periods
WITH 
periods  AS (select 0 as num UNION select 1 as num UNION select 2 UNION select 3 UNION select 4 UNION select 5 UNION select 6 UNION select 7 UNION select 8 UNION select 9 UNION select 10 UNION select 11),
hours    AS (select num from periods UNION ALL select num + 12 from periods),
days     AS (select num from periods where num <= 6),
rightnow AS (select CAST( TO_CHAR(GETDATE(), 'yyyy-mm-dd hh24') || ':' || trim(TO_CHAR((ROUND((DATEPART (MINUTE, GETDATE()) / 5), 1) * 5 ),'09')) AS TIMESTAMP) as start)
select  
  ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY d.num DESC, h.num DESC, p.num DESC) as idx
  , DATEADD(minutes, -p.num * 5, DATEADD( hours, -h.num, DATEADD( days, -d.num, n.start ) ) ) AS period_date
from days d, hours h, periods p, rightnow n

Should be able to extend this to other generation schemes. The trick here is using the Cartesian product join (i.e. no JOIN/WHERE clause) to multiply the hand-crafted CTE's to produce the necessary increments and apply to an anchor date.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.