161

The == operator is used to compare two strings in shell script. However, I want to compare two strings ignoring case, how can it be done? Is there any standard command for this?

14 Answers 14

188

In Bash, you can use parameter expansion to modify a string to all lower-/upper-case:

var1=TesT
var2=tEst

echo ${var1,,} ${var2,,}
echo ${var1^^} ${var2^^}
6
  • 14
    At least a reply that does not imply the shopt option. So you can compare two string ignoring case and in the same test, compare two other with case. Thanks
    – jehon
    Mar 2 '14 at 6:30
  • 45
    Is this new in Bash 4? At least in Bash 3.2.51 (used in OS X 10.9) it does not work - the first echo statement results in: -bash: ${var1,,}: bad substitution
    – Felix Rabe
    Jun 11 '14 at 13:33
  • 1
    Such case-insensitive comparison implementations are prone to localization issues (such as the Turkish I problem). I don't know how shopt -s nocasematch is implemented but usually such "language-level" solutions handle it correctly. Jan 12 '17 at 16:41
  • I'm with @FelixRabe; on macOS 10.13.6, which ships with Bash 3.2.57 and gives the same error Feb 18 '19 at 16:25
  • 3
    both ,, and ^^ work in bash 4.4.20 but neither work in zsh 5.4.2 (ubuntu 18.04)
    – transang
    Oct 27 '19 at 15:10
148

All of these answers ignore the easiest and quickest way to do this (as long as you have Bash 4):

if [ "${var1,,}" = "${var2,,}" ]; then
  echo ":)"
fi

All you're doing there is converting both strings to lowercase and comparing the results.

5
  • 8
    This is only available in Bash 4 or newer (e.g. not on Mac OS X 10.11)
    – d4Rk
    May 11 '16 at 14:47
  • 10
    @d4Rk which is why the first sentence of my answer says "as long as you have Bash 4". Having said that, Bash 4 has been out for over seven years at the time of writing this comment, and my own OS X install has had it for almost that long.
    – Riot
    May 12 '16 at 0:24
  • @Riot sorry, didn't notice that in the first place. I know you can install whatever bash you want on OS X, but default is 3.2 and as my script must run on different Macs as well, this is not really an option for me.
    – d4Rk
    May 12 '16 at 6:38
  • 2
    @d4Rk that's understandable - if you really need to guarantee portability, I would suggest sticking to the POSIX shell standard, as you're not guaranteed to find any version of bash at all in some cases.
    – Riot
    May 12 '16 at 12:52
  • An additional comment to this cause it took me awhile to figure out. You HAVE to have a space inbetween the equality. May 11 '20 at 21:59
84

if you have bash

str1="MATCH"
str2="match"
shopt -s nocasematch
case "$str1" in
 $str2 ) echo "match";;
 *) echo "no match";;
esac

otherwise, you should tell us what shell you are using.

alternative, using awk

str1="MATCH"
str2="match"
awk -vs1="$str1" -vs2="$str2" 'BEGIN {
  if ( tolower(s1) == tolower(s2) ){
    print "match"
  }
}'
5
  • 38
    For anyone comparing strings using if statements, the shopt approach requires you to use the double-bracket [[ ]] form of conditional instead of the single-bracket [ ] form. See also: gnu.org/software/bash/manual/html_node/The-Shopt-Builtin.html
    – indiv
    Sep 27 '12 at 22:37
  • 4
    The question indicates that == is used to compare two strings, but the response demonstrates case-insensitive comparison using a case statement. Reassuringly, the shopt solution also enables case-insensitive use of ==, =~, and other string comparison operators.
    – taranaki
    Dec 1 '15 at 2:35
  • 13
    Probably wise to execute shopt -u nocasematch after the comparison is done in order to revert back to bash's default. Jan 12 '17 at 16:44
  • 10
    Best to save and restore the nocasematch setting. Grab it with SHELLNOCASEMATCH=`shopt -p nocasematch` then change it with shopt -s nocasematch and once done, restore it with $SHELLNOCASEMATCH
    – Urhixidur
    Dec 5 '17 at 19:25
  • 6
    Better still: SHELLNOCASEMATCH=$(shopt -p nocasematch; true), because shopt -p will exit with code 1 if the option is not set, and this can cause the script to abort if set -e is in effect. Aug 22 '18 at 3:51
45

Save the state of nocasematch (in case some other function is depending on it being disabled):

local orig_nocasematch=$(shopt -p nocasematch; true)
shopt -s nocasematch

[[ "foo" == "Foo" ]] && echo "match" || echo "notmatch"

$orig_nocasematch

Note that local is only required inside a function.
Also, the ; true part will prevent the shell from exiting when set -e is on and $(shopt -p nocasematch) fails (because nocasematch was NOT set at all).

1
  • 4
    Nice because case statements (including those in ghostdog's answer) will always make my skin crawl Jul 28 '15 at 19:43
17

One way would be to convert both strings to upper or lower:

test $(echo "string" | /bin/tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]') = $(echo "String" | /bin/tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]') && echo same || echo different

Another way would be to use grep:

echo "string" | grep -qi '^String$' && echo same || echo different
1
  • I used the tr method in my docker-ized applications based on alpine (which provides sh via busybox). Thank you.
    – MXWest
    Aug 30 '19 at 20:11
7

For korn shell, I use typeset built-in command (-l for lower-case and -u for upper-case).

var=True
typeset -l var
if [[ $var == "true" ]]; then
    print "match"
fi
2
  • 2
    This is way better, in terms of performance than starting awk or any other process.
    – Alex
    Dec 12 '13 at 14:38
  • 1
    In bash, declare -l or -u can be used to set the attributes.
    – Bharat
    Sep 15 '18 at 13:04
6

Very easy if you fgrep to do a case-insensitive line compare:

str1="MATCH"
str2="match"

if [[ $(fgrep -ix $str1 <<< $str2) ]]; then
    echo "case-insensitive match";
fi
1
  • It would be better to use if fgrep -qix -- "$str1" <<<"$str2"; then instead.
    – user3285991
    Nov 19 '19 at 23:07
5

For zsh the syntax is slightly different, but still shorter than most answers here:

> str1='mAtCh'
> str2='MaTcH'
> [[ "$str1:u" = "$str2:u" ]] && echo 'Strings Match!'
Strings Match!
>

This will convert both strings to uppercase before the comparison.


Another method makes use zsh's globbing flags, which allows us to directly make use of case-insensitive matching by using the i glob flag:

setopt extendedglob
[[ $str1 = (#i)$str2 ]] && echo "Match success"
[[ $str1 = (#i)match ]] && echo "Match success"
1
  • Why is there a second line with the globbing flags that compares str1 to match?
    – Timo
    yesterday
4

Here is my solution using tr:

var1=match
var2=MATCH
var1=`echo $var1 | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]'`
var2=`echo $var2 | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]'`
if [ "$var1" = "$var2" ] ; then
  echo "MATCH"
fi
4

grep has a -i flag which means case insensitive so ask it to tell you if var2 is in var1.

var1=match 
var2=MATCH 
if echo $var1 | grep -i "^${var2}$" > /dev/null ; then
    echo "MATCH"
fi
1
  • 3
    won't work if there are any regex special characters in var2.
    – haridsv
    Feb 11 '13 at 11:16
4

I came across this great blog/tutorial/whatever about dealing with case sensitive pattern. The following three methods are explained in details with examples:

1. Convert pattern to lowercase using tr command

opt=$( tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]' <<<"$1" )
case $opt in
        sql)
                echo "Running mysql backup using mysqldump tool..."
                ;;
        sync)
                echo "Running backup using rsync tool..."
                ;;
        tar)
                echo "Running tape backup using tar tool..."
                ;;
        *)
                echo "Other options"
                ;;
esac

2. Use careful globbing with case patterns

opt=$1
case $opt in
        [Ss][Qq][Ll])
                echo "Running mysql backup using mysqldump tool..."
                ;;
        [Ss][Yy][Nn][Cc])
                echo "Running backup using rsync tool..."
                ;;
        [Tt][Aa][Rr])
                echo "Running tape backup using tar tool..."
                ;;
        *)
                echo "Other option"
                ;;
esac

3. Turn on nocasematch

opt=$1
shopt -s nocasematch
case $opt in
        sql)
                echo "Running mysql backup using mysqldump tool..."
                ;;
        sync)
                echo "Running backup using rsync tool..."
                ;;
        tar)
                echo "Running tape backup using tar tool..."
                ;;
        *)
                echo "Other option"
                ;;
esac

shopt -u nocasematch
0

shopt -s nocaseglob

0
0

The 'tr' utility (translate characters) is always present on all Unix/Linux machines, and is light-weight.

Here is a function that can be used to address case insensitive comparisons. Since the exact location of 'tr' can vary, we first probe its likely locations and store the correct location in an env var appropriately named "BIN_TR".

declare BIN_TR=$( ls /bin/tr /usr/bin/tr 2>/dev/null | head -1 );

That is then used in the function declaration.

toLowerCase() {
  echo "$*" | $BIN_TR '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]'
}

A solution using 'tr' is expected to be highly portable between different variations of OS and OS set-up. While 'awk' is also highly probable, the 'tr' utility is tiny compared to 'awk', and so a function using 'tr' is presumably lighter weight.

0

On Unix-like operating systems, the test command checks file types and compares values.

str1="MATCH"
str2="match"

if test $str1 =  $str2
  then
  echo "equal yes"
else
  echo "equal not"
fi

On Unix-like operating systems, the test command checks file types and compares values.

it's very simple that way.

in a few lines of code

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