15

I'm picking a specific task to illustrate what I was talking about

Let's say I wanted to find the sum of all the factors of a large number, naively -- by checking every number below it if it was a factor, then adding them together.

In an imperative programming language with no separation between IO and pure computations, you might do something like this

def sum_of_factors(n):
  sum = 0
  for i between 1 and n:
    if (n % i == 0):
      sum += i
  return sum

However if my n is large, I'd end up staring at an empty screen for a long time before the computation finishes. So I add some logging --

def sum_of_factors(n):
  sum = 0
  for i between 1 and n:
    if (i % 1000 == 0):
      print "checking $i..."
    if (n % i == 0):
      print "found factor $i"
      sum += 1
  return sum

and really, this addition is trivial.

Now, if I were to do this in textbook haskell i might do

sum_of_factors :: Int -> Int
sum_of_factors n = foldl' (+) 0 factors
  where
    factors = filter ((== 0) . (mod n)) [1..n]

I run into the same problem as before...for large numbers, I just stare at a blank screen for a while.

But I can't figure out how to inject the same kind of tracing/logging in the Haskell code. i'm not sure, other than maybe re-implementing fold with explicit recursion, to get the same tracing pattern/result as in the imperative impure code.

Is there a faculty in Haskell to make this doable? One that doesn't require refactoring everything?

Thank you

  • 3
    For debugging, you could use traceShow (or related functions) from Debug.Trace. But I would be interested in a non-debug version, too. – Stefan Jun 25 '13 at 7:10
  • 1
    Note: You have your divisions the wrong way, if (i % n == 0) resp. is_factor i = i `mod` n == 0. Also, (take n [1..]) should be [1 .. n]. – Daniel Fischer Jun 25 '13 at 8:15
  • Doesn't filter ((== 3) . (`mod` n)) [1..n] always yield 3 for n > 3? Mapping (`mod` n) on [1..n] just yields [1,2,...n-1,0] and the only element for which (== 3) is true is, well, 3. – Frerich Raabe Jun 25 '13 at 23:02
  • @FrerichRaabe sorry, typo ... should be == 0 and not infix'd – Justin L. Jun 25 '13 at 23:09
  • This question made me wonder, is there an existing function for getting all the factors (not just the primes) of some number, something like \x -> let f = filter ((== 0) . (x `mod`)) [1..round . sqrt . fromIntegral $ x] in f ++ map (x `div`) f? – Frerich Raabe Jun 26 '13 at 8:14
14

There is a number of possible solutions.

The simplest one is to alter your function to return stream of events instead of the final result. You sum_of_factors doesn't compile for me, so I'll use a sum function as an example. The idea is to send Left message to show progress, and send Right result when done. Thanks to lazy evaluation, you'll see progress events while the function is working:

import Control.Monad

sum' :: [Int] -> [Either String Int]
sum' = go step 0
  where
  step = 10000
  go _ res [] = [Right res]
  go 0 res (x:xs) = Left ("progress: " ++ show x) : go step (res + x) xs
  go c res (x:xs) = go (c - 1) (res + x) xs

main :: IO ()
main = do
  forM_ (sum' [1..1000000]) $ \event ->
    case event of
      Right res -> putStrLn $ "Result: " ++ show res
      Left str -> putStrLn str

Other (and better from my point of view) solution is to make the function monadic:

class Monad m => LogM m where
  logMe :: String -> m ()

instance LogM IO where
  logMe = putStrLn

sum' :: LogM m => [Int] -> m Int
sum' = go step 0
  where
  step = 10000
  go _ res [] = return res
  go 0 res (x:xs) = logMe ("progress: " ++ show x) >> go step (res + x) xs
  go c res (x:xs) = go (c - 1) (res + x) xs

main :: IO ()
main = sum' [1..1000000] >>= print

or using foldM:

import Control.Monad

sum' :: LogM m => [Int] -> m Int
sum' = liftM snd . foldM go (0, 0)
  where
    step = 10000
    -- `!` forces evaluation and prevents build-up of thunks.
    -- See the BangPatterns language extension.
    go (!c, !res) x = do
        when (c == 0) $ logMe ("progress: " ++ show x)
        return $ ((c + 1) `mod` step, res + x)
  • I kind of said this but not really, but I'm looking for a solution that doesn't require me to reimplement fold down to explicit recursion if possible. The reason is that I'd like to retain the expressiveness of fold and also be able to quickly "turn off" logging without swapping out too many functions. – Justin L. Jun 25 '13 at 16:19
  • 2
    @JustinL. You can use foldM to avoid explicit recursion. – Petr Pudlák Jun 25 '13 at 16:45
  • 2
    @JustinL. Logging is a side effect, so you have to either emulate it via streaming or explicitly define via monadic context. You can extend LogM with enableLoggin, disableLoggin, withoutLogging, etc methods to create configurable logging framework. Or even enable/disable logging at compile time as @PetrPudlák suggested. Note: "monadic" doesn't mean "impure". – Yuras Jun 25 '13 at 17:45
  • @PetrPudlák I somehow overlooked foldM... Thank you for the comment! – Yuras Jun 25 '13 at 17:47
  • @PetrPudlák how would I use foldM? – Justin L. Jun 25 '13 at 23:16
10

If you need quick and dirty logging, you can use Debug.Trace. It allows you to quickly add logging functions into pure code. (Of course, under the hood it uses unsafe stuff for that.) Be prepared that its logging output appears at different times than you expect (or not at all) - this is the consequence of adding impure debugging code into pure computations that are lazily evaluated.

Otherwise, you have to use monadic code, in order to properly sequence logging output. One of well developed libraries that uses IO is hslogger.

If you don't want to bind your code to IO (which is very sensible), Yuras' approach is the way to go. Create your own monad type class that describes your logging operations (perhaps with different levels etc.). Then, have one instance that produces logging output, like in the answer, and one instance that doesn't do anything, like

instance LogM Identity where
  logMe _ = return ()

Then, just by switching the monad you're working with, you turn loggin on/off, and the compiler optimizes the Identity monad away.

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