33

I want to expand div parent with child div but I don't know if that's possible and how to do it.

enter image description here

I prepare a fiddle and included some code.

CSS

body {
    background: gray;
}
div.page {
    color: white;
    background: black;
    max-width: 72em;
    margin: auto;
    padding: 1em;
}
div.one {
    background-color: red;
    width: 40%;
}
div.two {
    background-color: green;
    width: 120%;
}

HTML

<body>
    <div class="page">
        <div class="one">One</div>
        <div class="two">Two</div>
    </div>
</body>
12
  • 3
    You're asking the child to be wider than its parent (width: 120%). Are you trying to create a CSS paradox? Jun 25 '13 at 7:31
  • @PatriceLevesque I can have wrong understand of CSS - tell me more. Is it impossible to set width of parent by children in such way? It width calculated from parent to child (so it is not possible in reverse way? Should I set parent width larger to keep child inside it if it require more space (min-width)?
    – Chameleon
    Jun 25 '13 at 7:42
  • The answer to your question is yes. The padding:1em in your div.page(parent) is the one that controls the width of your div.two(child). see this jsfiddle jsfiddle.net/CrfaE/6
    – bot
    Jun 25 '13 at 8:03
  • Or what are you trying to do is to make the width of div.two reach the end of the parent div.page on the right side without a space? because below answer is already correct base on my understanding.
    – bot
    Jun 25 '13 at 8:11
  • By the way, can I ask why you are using an XHTML namespace but an HTML content-type? XHTML and HTML should not be mixed; there are too many distinct differences.
    – Mr Lister
    Jun 25 '13 at 8:17
43

The key solution to your problem is to use display:inline-block;

HTML

body {
    background: gray;
}
div.page {
    color: white;
    background: black;
    margin: auto;
    padding: 1em;
    display:inline-block;
}
div.one {
    background-color: red;
    width: 10em;
    display:inline-block;
}
div.two {
    background-color: green;
    width: 40em;
    display:inline-block;
}
<div class="page">
  <div class="one">One</div>
  <div class="two">Two</div>
</div>

3
  • i know it is old, but if you need IE7 support, use display: inline-block; *display: inline; *zoom: 1; Jan 1 '17 at 5:13
  • 2
    this is what I needed... now ... to understand the WHY... anyone? Sep 5 '18 at 22:11
  • 1
    A block element will claim the horizontal space that the parent has to offer whereas an inline-block will take the horizontal space it needs to display the content (unless overridden). If the inline-block is bigger than the parent, it will overflow. You can make a block element to evaluate content width by setting width: fit-content however that is not IE compatible.
    – voneiden
    Mar 22 '20 at 17:39
8

You cannot use % and expect box to overflow, else it never ends 100% turns 120%, but then 120% of 120%, becomes .. and so on. forget this idea, it cannot work.

Your CSS request is incoherent.

Beside, to see an element to grow wider than window, one of the parent must be able to behave this way, mostly , content overflow and remain visible. (html/body or parent)

as far as i know only:

display:
  1. table
  2. inline-table
  3. table-row
  4. table-cell

Can let container grow as much as content does.

1
  • This is very interesting and useful to know. I have used display: table only very sparingly in the past
    – Post Self
    Jul 8 '18 at 10:54
2

Your problem is this:

div.two {
        background-color: green;
        width: 120%;
}

You are telling the child to be 120% the width of the parent, which is to say, the entire width plus 20% more. Make it 100% and you should get the expected result..

11
  • I can have wrong understand of CSS - tell me more. Is it impossible to set width of parent by children in such way? It width calculated from parent to child (so it is not possible in reverse way? Should I set parent width larger to keep child inside it if it require more space (min-width)?
    – Chameleon
    Jun 25 '13 at 7:43
  • 1
    IT sure seems like you have it worng. 100% of an element is the entire thing, if you set it to more than 100% it is the whole width, plus whatever number. If you fill a glass with water, but have 120% of the volume of the glass, it will fill all the way to the top and then the remaining 20% will spill over. :)
    – Kyle
    Jun 25 '13 at 7:45
  • It means that I should set parent width to i.e. 80em if I want keep inside children with width less than 80em - and it always 81em children will overflow (not resize parent).
    – Chameleon
    Jun 25 '13 at 7:50
  • 1
    Depends on your EM setting but yes. Also it depends on the styles you have applied to the parent. By default they should resize to containe their parents, but if you have a set width or some overflow properties that will hinder it.
    – Kyle
    Jun 25 '13 at 8:04
  • 1
    @Chameleon That is confusing. What do you want the child width to be? 80em? If so, then it's easy: just float the parent, then it will adjust itself to its children's width. But that is impossible with a child width of 120%. Forget about the 120%. It won't work.
    – Mr Lister
    Jun 25 '13 at 8:04

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