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I want to write a thread which understand a thread has finished and starts new thread. I mean I wrote this code :

 new Thread(new Runnable(){ 
            @Override public void run(){
    //code here
                } 
           }).start();

But I want to do it in for loop. I want to create just 5 thread.But when a thread has finished I want to create a new one.

for(int i=0;i<300;i++)
{
 //I want to create 5 thread here and stop code  and then when a thread has finished I want //to create  new thread.
}
  • Are you trying to implement a Thread Pool? – Rohit Jain Jun 25 '13 at 12:15
  • thanks for replying. actually I dont know what it means. But I want to create 5 thread for i=0,1,2,3,4,5 and then I want to wait when thread count is less then 5 I want to create a new thread. – Ersin Gülbahar Jun 25 '13 at 12:20
  • 'when a thread has finished I want to create a new one' - what is wrong with the old one? If you want to 'start a thread again', just put a loop in the old thread. – Martin James Jun 25 '13 at 12:20
  • @MartinJames I mean it finished its work. I give new task to thread. – Ersin Gülbahar Jun 25 '13 at 12:21
  • 1
    So why use threads? Why not just run your computations sequentially without the overhead of creating, starting, and waiting for threads at all? – user207421 Jun 25 '13 at 12:36
1

If you want a more universal method, but more low level you can use a semaphore:

final Semaphore s = new Semaphore(5);
for (int i = 0; i < 20; ++i)
{
    final int j = i;

    s.acquire();

    new Thread(new Runnable()
    {
        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                System.out.println("Thread " + j + " starts.");
                Thread.sleep(1000);
                System.out.println("Thread " + j + " ends.");
            }
            catch (InterruptedException e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            finally
            {
                s.release();
            }
        }

    }).start();
}
  • Semaphore means 5 threads run at the same time? or one thread waits the others? – Ersin Gülbahar Jun 25 '13 at 14:18
  • A semaphore limits the number of times it can be acquired: so here the semaphore can be acquired 5 times, any attempt to acquire it one more time will block until one of the threads release it. – Pragmateek Jun 25 '13 at 14:24
  • To be pedantic: at most 5 threads run at the same time. Because first between the moment a thread release the semaphore and another is launched there is a (likely ridiculously small) delay. Secondly at the end, when all the first 296 ends there is still 4 running, then 3 running... – Pragmateek Jun 25 '13 at 14:34
  • I have just one question. Semaphore works which I want. But I want to wonder about semaphore or threadpool is faster? Thank you – Ersin Gülbahar Jun 28 '13 at 9:36
5

The thread class has these methods, which could be used to do what you want:

Thread.join()
Thread.isAlive()

But, you probably really want to use a thread pool, like this:

    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5);
    for(int i=0;i<N;i++) {
        executor.submit(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
            }
        });
    }
  • I want to use variable i in run method but I cant. Because it need to be declared as a final but it doesnt allow too – Ersin Gülbahar Jun 25 '13 at 12:45
  • @user2328779: you can't mark it final because you change it with i++. Just use a temporary variable j in your loop like in my sample. – Pragmateek Jun 25 '13 at 12:57
  • @Pragmateek I cant because it says annot assign a value to final variable sayac_thread – Ersin Gülbahar Jun 25 '13 at 13:00
  • If you are planning to modify the variable in multiple threads you are going to run into a new problem-- writing to the same variable in multiple threads is not thread safe. If appropriate, consider having the threads operate on an java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger – Keith Jun 25 '13 at 13:02
  • @user2328779: why would you want to change i? If you don't need, my code implements a "standard" way of reading it from your runnable. – Pragmateek Jun 25 '13 at 13:17
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You sounded like you want to create task base on the currently running task. Here I have an example which you could create new task in another task. Perhaps, you may also want to look at java.util.concurrent.ForkJoinPool

final ExecutorService executorService = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5);

executorService.submit(new Runnable(){
    @Override
    public void run() {
        //code here which run by 5 threads, thread can be reused when the task is finished

        //new task can be created at the end of another task
        executorService.submit(...)
    }
});

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