15

I want to change a String so that all the uppercase characters become lowercase, and all the lower case characters become uppercase. Number characters are just ignored.

so "AbCdE123" becomes "aBcDe123"

I guess there must be a way to iterate through the String and flip each character, or perhaps some regular expression that could do it.

  • 4
    No, regex cannot be used in this case. – Bart Kiers Nov 13 '09 at 15:14
20

I don't believe there's anything built-in to do this (it's relatively unusual). This should do it though:

public static String reverseCase(String text)
{
    char[] chars = text.toCharArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++)
    {
        char c = chars[i];
        if (Character.isUpperCase(c))
        {
            chars[i] = Character.toLowerCase(c);
        }
        else if (Character.isLowerCase(c))
        {
            chars[i] = Character.toUpperCase(c);
        }
    }
    return new String(chars);
}

Note that this doesn't do the locale-specific changing that String.toUpperCase/String.toLowerCase does. It also doesn't handle non-BMP characters.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @JacobM: How do they build the array in the end? I find that going to a char array, modifying in place and then building a String at the end is one of the more efficient ways of doing this sort of work. – Jon Skeet Nov 13 '09 at 15:30
  • 1
    Looks like they start by allocating a StringBuffer and appending each converted character to the buffer. I guess then the question is whether StringBuffer.toString is more or less efficient than new String(char[]). I couldn't tell you. Source code available at kickjava.com/src/org/apache/commons/lang/StringUtils.java.htm – Jacob Mattison Nov 13 '09 at 15:38
  • 1
    By using StringBuffer rather than StringBuilder they're already incurring the (small) synchronization penalty on every operation. Then there's the internal housekeeping for StringBuffer, keeping the length vs capacity etc. I'm not saying it's a big difference - but in both cases there'll be an extra (unavoidable) extra copy made, and I can't see any actual advantages to the StringBuffer approach. – Jon Skeet Nov 13 '09 at 15:42
  • 1
    This is quickly devolving into pedantry, at any rate it used to be the case that calling StringBuffer.toString() would reuse the char[] array by calling a package-private String constructor. I just checked, and that's no longer the case in 1.5+, StringBuilder and StringBuffer's toString methods copy the char array. At any rate, I like the char[] approach better. – Sam Barnum Nov 13 '09 at 16:19
  • 1
    Sam: String(Buffer|Builder).toString must have created a copy in earlier Java versions as well, as modifications to the StringBuffer cannot cause changes to previosuly created String instances. – jarnbjo Nov 13 '09 at 16:26
24

Apache Commons StringUtils has a swapCase method.

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  • 1
    Their StringUtils is one of the best tools for manipulating strings. – Trick Nov 13 '09 at 15:11
  • 2
    Adding a dependency to a largish library for only a single function of very limited complexity could be argued against. – Daniel Schneller Nov 13 '09 at 15:21
  • Agreed about the dependency, but if you look around you'll probably find other places that Commons code can simplify your code. – Jacob Mattison Nov 13 '09 at 15:22
  • I'd also add that there are advantages to using an approach that is known to be heavily tested and widely used, such as Apache Commons. If you implemented it yourself, there might be nothing wrong with your basic algorithm, but (unless you get Jon Skeet to write it for you) you might have a little off-by-one error or some such that won't turn up until later. – Jacob Mattison Nov 13 '09 at 18:39
2

I guess there must be a way to iterate through the String and flip each character

Correct. The java.lang.Character class provides you under each the isUpperCase() method for that. Test on it and make use of the toLowerCase() or toUpperCase() methods depending on the outcome. Append the outcome of each to a StringBuilder and you should be fine.

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  • 2
    No need to append to a StringBuilder - you already know exactly how big the output will be, and you can do it in an array in-place. – Jon Skeet Nov 13 '09 at 15:13
  • That's indeed doable if he don't need to manipulate it afterwards. – BalusC Nov 13 '09 at 15:15
  • 4
    Jon: If you honour locale-specific rules, changing the case of a string does not necessarily keep the length. E.g. the upper case of "ß" is "SS" for German locales. – jarnbjo Nov 13 '09 at 17:16
2

Based on Faraz's approach, I think the character conversion can be as simple as:

t += Character.isUpperCase(c) ? Character.toLowerCase(c) : Character.toUpperCase(c);
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1

Java 8 and above:

String myString = "MySampleString123";
System.out.println(myString.chars().map(c -> Character.isLetter(c) ? c ^ ' ' : c).collect(StringBuilder::new, StringBuilder::appendCodePoint, StringBuilder::append).toString());

Code which is inverting the case of letter, is important to notice:

Character.isLetter(c) ? c ^ ' ' : c
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0

We can also use a StringBuilder object, as it has character replacing methods. However, it might take some extra space to store the StringBuilder object. So, it will help if space does not matter and keep the solution simple to understand.

String swapCase(String text) {
    StringBuilder textSB = new StringBuilder(text);
    for(int i = 0; i < text.length(); i++) {
        if(text.charAt(i) > 64 && text.charAt(i) < 91)
            textSB.setCharAt(i, (char)(text.charAt(i) + 32));
        else if(text.charAt(i) > 96 && text.charAt(i) < 123)
            textSB.setCharAt(i, (char)(text.charAt(i) - 32));
    }
    return textSB.toString();
}
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0
public class ReverseCase {
    public  static void main(String[] args){ 
        char[] char_arr = args[0].toCharArray();
        for (int i = 0; i < char_arr.length; i++) {
            if (Character.isLowerCase(char_arr[i])) {
                char_arr[i] = Character.toUpperCase(char_arr[i]);
            }else {
                char_arr[i] = Character.toLowerCase(char_arr[i]);
            }
        }
        String reversed = new String(char_arr);
        System.out.println(reversed);
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

I think the simplest solution to understand would be something like:

public static String reverseCase(String text) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (char c : text.toCharArray())
        sb.append((Character.isUpperCase(c)) ? 
                Character.toLowerCase(c) : 
                Character.toUpperCase(c));
    return sb.toString();
}

I think you can read through this easier and StringBuilder has an append(char) method anyways. I just felt bad that the only StringBuilder example had ascii index arithmetics included as well.

For those who don't like ternary expressions, here's the equivalent:

public static String reverseCase(String text) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    char opposite;
    for (char c : text.toCharArray())
        if (Character.isUpperCase(c)) 
            opposite = Character.toLowerCase(c);
        else 
            opposite = Character.toUpperCase(c);
        sb.append(opposite);
    return sb.toString();
}
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-1

I do realize that the given thread is very old, but there is a better way of solving it:

class Toggle
{ 
    public static void main()
    { 
        String str = "This is a String";
        String t = "";
        for (int x = 0; x < str.length(); x++)
        {  
            char c = str.charAt(x);
            boolean check = Character.isUpperCase(c);
            if (check == true)
                t = t + Character.toLowerCase(c);
            else
                t = t + Character.toUpperCase(c);
        }
        System.out.println (t);
    }
}
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  • 3
    Would you care to explain why this is "better"? It's (functionally) not (very) different than the already accepted answer. You do, however, not use a fixed length array or stringbuilder so your solution is, in that sense, even worse 'cause of much more (re)allocations required. Another thing is that you're introducing a variable check which is, at least, not very descriptive. Also; it's a matter of style/taste but if it were up to me I'd just write if (Character.isUpperCase(c)) instead of first assigning check and then checking the variable… – RobIII Jan 27 '15 at 17:40

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