5

How come?

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    sb.append("Hello");
    sb.append((String)null);
    sb.append(" World!");
    Log.d("Test", sb.toString());

Produces

06-25 18:24:24.354: D/Test(20740): Hellonull World!

I expect that appending a null String will not append at all!!
BTW, the cast to String is necessary because StringBuilder.append() has a lot of overloaded versions.

I simplified my code to make a point here, in my code a got a method returning a string

public String getString() { ... }
...
sb.append(getString());
...

getString() sometimes returns null; now I have to test it if I want to use a StringBuilder!!!!

Furthermore, let's clarify my question here: how can I get StringBuilder.append() to accept, in an elegant way, a null string, and not convert it to the literal string "null".
By elegant I mean I don't want to get the string, test if it is null and only then append it. I am looking for an elegant oneliner.

10 Answers 10

4

That's just the way it is. null is appended as "null". Similarly, when you print null with System.out.println(null) you print "null".

The way to avoid that is that method that returns string getString() checks for null:

public String getString() {
    ...
    if (result == null) {
        return "";
    }
}
5
How come?

Its clearly written in docs

The characters of the String argument are appended, in order, increasing the length of this sequence by the length of the argument. If str is null, then the four characters "null" are appended.

So please put a null check before append.

  • 1
    Ok, it is written in the documentation. But, is it just me of it is very counterintuitive? I learned that a null string is a string that does not exist. And without opening a discussion, I just don't get why they did it that way. Right now I am banging my head on the desk. – ilomambo Jun 26 '13 at 9:05
  • 1
    I think you are confusing a null and an empty String. As you say (String) null is a String that does not exist, which is represented by "null" in the String domain. On the other hand the empty String "" non-surprisingly has the representation "". When you debug or print some String variable, you want to actually see that it's pointing to null, so it makes sense. – LastFreeNickname Jun 26 '13 at 9:49
  • @LastFreeNickname Not really, when a string is null I don't want/expect to see nothing. If I use a debugger I want to inspect the variable and see its value as null. It seems not so long ago that in an algebra course the professor said that there is a special symbol to signify an empty set, a set with no elements at all, which is the analog to a null string. Showing something for a null string is breaking consistency with the very same definition of null. But this is crying over spilled milk, someday I hope to learn the reason why. – ilomambo Jun 27 '13 at 4:55
2

It behaves like this, because null isn't an empty String as you think of it. Empty Stringwould be new String("");. Basically append() method appends "null" if it gets null value as a parameter.

  • I did not say "empty string" I said "a string that does not exist" – ilomambo Jun 26 '13 at 9:16
2

EDIT
My previous answer was not reflecting the appropriate reason for such behaviour of StringBuilder as asked by OP. Thanks to @Stephen C for pointing out that

I expect that appending a null String will not append at all!!

But it is appending. The reason for such behaviour of StringBuilder is hidden in implementation detail of append(Object obj) method which takes us to AbstractStringBuilder#append(String str) method which is defined as follows:

public AbstractStringBuilder append(String str) {
    if (str == null) str = "null"; -->(1)
    //.......
    return this;
}

It clearly specifying that if the input String is null then it is changed to String literal "null" and then it processes further.

How can I get StringBuilder.append() to accept, in an elegant way, a null string, and not convert it to the literal string "null".

You need to check the given String for null explicitly and then proceed. For example:

String s = getString();
StringBuffer buf = new StringBuffer();
//Suppose you want "Hello "<value of s>" world"
buf.append("Hello ");
buf.append(s==null?" world" : s+" world");
  • Strictly speaking, the JLS is not definitive for this. The JLS is actually specifying the semantics of the "+" operator. You could argue that it is a convenient coincidence that StringBuilder.append(null) implements the required behaviour. (I'm sure it isn't a coincidence, but you get my point ...) – Stephen C Jun 26 '13 at 9:08
1

AbstractStringBuilder class appends an object through String.valueOf(obj) method which in turn converts NULL into string literal "null". Therefor there is no inbuilt method to help you here. You have to either use ternary operator within append method or write a utility method to handle it, as others suggested.

1

This will work for you

public static String getString(StringBuilder sb, String str) {
    return sb.append(str == null ? "" : str).toString();
}
0

What about writing an utility method like

public static void appendString(StringBuilder sb, String st) {
    sb.append(st == null ? "" : st);
}

or this the ternary operator is very handy.

0
String nullString = null;
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
sb.append("Hello");
if (nullString != null) sb.append(nullString);
sb.append(" World!");
Log.d("Test", sb.toString());

There! I did it in one line :)

  • 1
    :-) no question it is very elegant :-) – ilomambo Jun 26 '13 at 9:05
0

One line?

sb.append((getString()!=null)?getString():"");

done. But is pointless as have to call getString() twice

As was suggested build check into getString() method

0

You can also write decorator for StringBuilder, which can check whatever you want:

class NotNullStringBuilderDecorator {

    private StringBuilder builder;

    public NotNullStringBuilderDecorator() {
        this.builder = new StringBuilder();
    }

    public NotNullStringBuilderDecorator append(CharSequence charSequence) {
        if (charSequence != null) {
            builder.append(charSequence);
        }

        return this;
    }

    public NotNullStringBuilderDecorator append(char c) {
        builder.append(c);

        return this;
    }

    //Other methods if you want

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return builder.toString();
    }
}

Example of usage:

NotNullStringBuilderDecorator sb = new NotNullStringBuilderDecorator();
sb.append("Hello");
sb.append((String) null);
sb.append(" World!");

System.out.println(sb.toString());

With this solution you have not to change POJO classes.

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