21

I'm using Entity Framework (code first) and finding the order I specify clauses in my LINQ queries is having a huge performance impact, so for example:

using (var db = new MyDbContext())
{
    var mySize = "medium";
    var myColour = "vermilion";
    var list1 = db.Widgets.Where(x => x.Colour == myColour && x.Size == mySize).ToList();
    var list2 = db.Widgets.Where(x => x.Size == mySize && x.Colour == myColour).ToList();
}

Where the (rare) colour clause precedes the (common) size clause it's fast, but the other way round it's orders of magnitude slower. The table has a couple of million rows and the two fields in question are nvarchar(50), so not normalised but they are each indexed. The fields are specified in a code first fashion as follows:

    [StringLength(50)]
    public string Colour { get; set; }

    [StringLength(50)]
    public string Size { get; set; }

Am I really supposed to have to worry about such things in my LINQ queries, I thought that was the database's job?

System specs are:

  • Visual Studio 2010
  • .NET 4
  • EntityFramework 6.0.0-beta1
  • SQL Server 2008 R2 Web (64 bit)

Update:

Right, to any gluttons for punishment the effect can be replicated as below. The issue seems to be tremendously sensitive to a number of factors so please bear with the contrived nature of some of this:

Install EntityFramework 6.0.0-beta1 via nuget, then generate code first style with:

public class Widget
{
    [Key]
    public int WidgetId { get; set; }

    [StringLength(50)]
    public string Size { get; set; }

    [StringLength(50)]
    public string Colour { get; set; }
}

public class MyDbContext : DbContext
{
    public MyDbContext()
        : base("DefaultConnection")
    {
    }

    public DbSet<Widget> Widgets { get; set; }
}

Generate the dummy data with the following SQL:


insert into gadget (Size, Colour)
select RND1 + ' is the name is this size' as Size,
RND2 + ' is the name of this colour' as Colour
from (Select top 1000000
CAST(abs(Checksum(NewId())) % 100 as varchar) As RND1,
CAST(abs(Checksum(NewId())) % 10000 as varchar) As RND2
from master..spt_values t1 cross join master..spt_values t2) t3

Add one index each for Colour and Size, then query with:


string mySize = "99 is the name is this size";
string myColour = "9999 is the name of this colour";
using (var db = new WebDbContext())
{
    var list1= db.Widgets.Where(x => x.Colour == myColour && x.Size == mySize).ToList();
}
using (var db = new WebDbContext())
{
    var list2 = db.Widgets.Where(x => x.Size == mySize && x.Colour == myColour).ToList();
}

The issue seems connected with the obtuse collection of NULL comparisons in the generated SQL, as below.

exec sp_executesql N'SELECT 
[Extent1].[WidgetId] AS [WidgetId], 
[Extent1].[Size] AS [Size], 
[Extent1].[Colour] AS [Colour]
FROM [dbo].[Widget] AS [Extent1]
WHERE ((([Extent1].[Size] = @p__linq__0) 
AND ( NOT ([Extent1].[Size] IS NULL OR @p__linq__0 IS NULL))) 
OR (([Extent1].[Size] IS NULL) AND (@p__linq__0 IS NULL))) 
AND ((([Extent1].[Colour] = @p__linq__1) AND ( NOT ([Extent1].[Colour] IS NULL 
OR @p__linq__1 IS NULL))) OR (([Extent1].[Colour] IS NULL) 
AND (@p__linq__1 IS NULL)))',N'@p__linq__0 nvarchar(4000),@p__linq__1 nvarchar(4000)',
@p__linq__0=N'99 is the name is this size',
@p__linq__1=N'9999 is the name of this colour'
go

Changing the equality operator in the LINQ to StartWith() makes the problem go away, as does changing either one of the two fields to be non nullable at the database.

I despair!

Update 2:

Some assistance for any bounty hunters, the issue can be reproduced on SQL Server 2008 R2 Web (64 bit) in a clean database, as follows:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Widget](
    [WidgetId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Size] [nvarchar](50) NULL,
    [Colour] [nvarchar](50) NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_dbo.Widget] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [WidgetId] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Widget_Size ON dbo.Widget
    (
    Size
    ) WITH( STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Widget_Colour ON dbo.Widget
    (
    Colour
    ) WITH( STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO


insert into Widget (Size, Colour)
select RND1 + ' is the name is this size' as Size,
RND2 + ' is the name of this colour' as Colour
from (Select top 1000000
CAST(abs(Checksum(NewId())) % 100 as varchar) As RND1,
CAST(abs(Checksum(NewId())) % 10000 as varchar) As RND2
from master..spt_values t1 cross join master..spt_values t2) t3
GO

and then compare the relative performance of the following two queries (you may need to adjust the parameter test values in order to get a query which returns a couple of rows in order to observe the effect, i.e. the second query id much slower).

exec sp_executesql N'SELECT 
[Extent1].[WidgetId] AS [WidgetId], 
[Extent1].[Size] AS [Size], 
[Extent1].[Colour] AS [Colour]
FROM [dbo].[Widget] AS [Extent1]
WHERE ((([Extent1].[Colour] = @p__linq__0) 
AND ( NOT ([Extent1].[Colour] IS NULL 
OR @p__linq__0 IS NULL))) 
OR (([Extent1].[Colour] IS NULL) 
AND (@p__linq__0 IS NULL))) 
AND ((([Extent1].[Size] = @p__linq__1) 
AND ( NOT ([Extent1].[Size] IS NULL 
OR @p__linq__1 IS NULL))) 
OR (([Extent1].[Size] IS NULL) AND (@p__linq__1 IS NULL)))',
N'@p__linq__0 nvarchar(4000),@p__linq__1 nvarchar(4000)',
@p__linq__0=N'9999 is the name of this colour',
@p__linq__1=N'99 is the name is this size'
go

exec sp_executesql N'SELECT 
[Extent1].[WidgetId] AS [WidgetId], 
[Extent1].[Size] AS [Size], 
[Extent1].[Colour] AS [Colour]
FROM [dbo].[Widget] AS [Extent1]
WHERE ((([Extent1].[Size] = @p__linq__0) 
AND ( NOT ([Extent1].[Size] IS NULL 
OR @p__linq__0 IS NULL))) 
OR (([Extent1].[Size] IS NULL) 
AND (@p__linq__0 IS NULL))) 
AND ((([Extent1].[Colour] = @p__linq__1) 
AND ( NOT ([Extent1].[Colour] IS NULL 
OR @p__linq__1 IS NULL))) 
OR (([Extent1].[Colour] IS NULL) 
AND (@p__linq__1 IS NULL)))',
N'@p__linq__0 nvarchar(4000),@p__linq__1 nvarchar(4000)',
@p__linq__0=N'99 is the name is this size',
@p__linq__1=N'9999 is the name of this colour'

You may also find, as I do, that if you rerun the dummy data insert so that there are now two million rows, the problem goes away.

  • Seems like a terrible choice to use nvarchar for those columns. – ChaosPandion Jun 26 '13 at 14:57
  • 6
    I expect that the order in the generated SQL is also reversed. Does the order matter if you run a query directly on the database, without Entity Framework? – user743382 Jun 26 '13 at 14:58
  • 3
    Check the TSQL coming out. Examine the query plan. Typically the query optimizer will find the best but there are cases when the order of the TSQL can affect the query plan but for 2 simple where that surprises me. – paparazzo Jun 26 '13 at 15:16
  • 3
    But what matters is the LINQ interpretation. Check the TSQL coming out of LINQ. – paparazzo Jun 26 '13 at 15:19
  • 5
    As far as the bounty is concerned, it's hard to get much more credible than @PaulWhite – swasheck Jul 26 '13 at 14:20
19
+50

The core of the question is not "why does the order matter with LINQ?". LINQ just translates literally without reordering. The real question is "why do the two SQL queries have different performance?".

I was able to reproduce the problem by only inserting 100k rows. In that case a weakness in the optimizer is being triggered: it does not recognize that it can do a seek on Colour due to the complex condition. In the first query the optimizer does recognize the pattern and creates an index seek.

There is no semantic reason why this should be. A seek on an index is possible even when seeking on NULL. This is a weakness/bug in the optimizer. Here are the two plans:

enter image description here

EF tries to be helpful here because it assumes that both the column and the filter variable can be null. In that case it tries to give you a match (which according to C# semantics is the right thing).

I tried undoing that by adding the following filter:

Colour IS NOT NULL AND @p__linq__0 IS NOT NULL
AND Size IS NOT NULL AND @p__linq__1 IS NOT NULL

Hoping that the optimizer now uses that knowledge to simplify the complex EF filter expression. It did not manage to do so. If this had worked the same filter could have been added to the EF query providing an easy fix.

Here are the fixes the I recommend in the order that you should try them:

  1. Make the database columns not-null in the database
  2. Make the columns not-null in the EF data model hoping that this will prevent EF from creating the complex filter condition
  3. Create indexes: Colour, Size and/or Size, Colour. They also remove them problem.
  4. Ensure that the filtering is done in the right order and leave a code comment
  5. Try to use INTERSECT/Queryable.Intersect to combine the filters. This often results in different plan shapes.
  6. Create an inline table-valued function that does the filtering. EF can use such a function as part of a bigger query
  7. Drop down to raw SQL
  8. Use a plan guide to change the plan

All of these are workarounds, not root cause fixes.

In the end I am not happy with both SQL Server and EF here. Both products should be fixed. Alas, they likely won't be and you can't wait for that either.

Here are the index scripts:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Widget_Colour_Size ON dbo.Widget
    (
    Colour, Size
    ) WITH( STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Widget_Size_Colour ON dbo.Widget
    (
   Size, Colour
    ) WITH( STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
  • 6
    The query optimizer does consider a seek on Colour, but rejects that alternative on cost-based grounds. It is also quite capable of seeking to NULL. Indexes on (colour, size) and (size, colour) do not directly address the core issue, though they are helpful to some extent. In-line table-valued functions are expanded into the query text before compilation so that would not help. A plan guide would not be feasible if the optimizer did not consider (and reject) the desired plan form. Comments intended as helpful to improve your answer, my answer is to augment yours, not replace it. – Paul White Jul 26 '13 at 9:55
  • Usr, thanks so much for taking the time to look at this and providing such a great answer. It's just the kind of thing I was hoping for. I'm glad the time I thought I'd wasted grappling with the original problem has led me to a worthy education. I'm late in returning to send the bounty your way and I see that your answer has been graciously augmented by Paul White in the interim. Paul many thanks for your learned contribution, if it's possible award you some further bounty, I intend to do so. Thanks again all. – stovroz Jul 26 '13 at 15:09
32
+550

It is hard to know whether this problem is caused by running an EF beta, but the SQL generated for the simple LINQ query is unexpectedly unhelpful from the SQL Server query optimizer's point of view.

Common SQL constructions for handling nullable equality comparisons do have specific SQL Server query optimizer support. One (of the many) compatible SQL query forms is:

(x = y) OR (x IS NULL AND y IS NULL)

The EF-generated SQL instead follows this pattern:

((x = y) AND NOT (x IS NULL OR y IS NULL)) OR (x IS NULL AND y IS NULL)

The extra AND NOT clause is redundant; however it is just opaque enough to avoid matching a crucial query optimizer simplification. The irony is that many of the simplification rules in the query optimizer exist purely to support generated code.

If EF had generated code matching the first SQL form (for example):

SELECT
    W.WidgetId, 
    W.Size, 
    W.Colour 
FROM dbo.Widget AS W
WHERE 
    (
        (W.Size = @p__linq__0) 
        OR 
        (W.Size IS NULL AND @p__linq__0 IS NULL)
    )
    AND
    (
        (W.Colour = @p__linq__1) 
        OR 
        (W.Colour IS NULL AND @p__linq__1 IS NULL)
    );

...the execution plan would be a simple index intersection, using a single NULL-aware equality predicate on each seek:

Index intersection plan

This same efficient plan is generated if the order of the main predicate sets in the WHERE clause is reversed.

The problem can be avoided in this case by declaring the columns in the database and/or EF code as NOT NULL (assuming the data does not in fact contain NULLs), but this does not change the fact that simple nullable column comparisons ought to be handled better.

If the EF and SQL Server teams had worked together on this, either EF would generate code in a more optimizer-friendly form, or specific support for this syntax would have been added to the SQL Server optimizer. Note that there will always be more ways to write the same logical requirement in SQL than a general-purpose database optimizer can (or should) anticipate. For one thing, it is just not possible to anticipate every possible construction, and for another you would not like the plan compilation times if it did.

There is a final SQL Server feature that I should mention, because it is a shame that code generators generally seem not support it. Where the generated query is marked for recompilation on each execution using the OPTION (RECOMPILE) query hint, the query optimizer can use the Parameter Embedding Optimization to produce a one-off query plan for the specific parameter values.

This is a powerful feature, capable of completely removing or rewriting unnecessary portions of a query before optimization. For example, simply adding the query hint to the original generated SQL:

SELECT 
[Extent1].[WidgetId] AS [WidgetId], 
[Extent1].[Size] AS [Size], 
[Extent1].[Colour] AS [Colour]
FROM [dbo].[Widget] AS [Extent1]
WHERE ((([Extent1].[Size] = @p__linq__0) 
AND ( NOT ([Extent1].[Size] IS NULL 
OR @p__linq__0 IS NULL))) 
OR (([Extent1].[Size] IS NULL) 
AND (@p__linq__0 IS NULL))) 
AND ((([Extent1].[Colour] = @p__linq__1) 
AND ( NOT ([Extent1].[Colour] IS NULL 
OR @p__linq__1 IS NULL))) 
OR (([Extent1].[Colour] IS NULL) 
AND (@p__linq__1 IS NULL)))
OPTION (RECOMPILE);

...produces an optimal plan tailored to the specific parameter values:

Recompiled plan

There is a price to pay for the plan compilation on every execution, but the improved plan quality often repays this cost many times over. Where a good plan depends sensitively on the passed parameter values, this can be a very effective technique.

  • 7
    +1 And this is why frameworks will never be better than a human who knows his stuff, and relying on them limits you to the best abilities of what the creators predicted you might want to do (or less, since sometimes there are artificial limitations in what is supported). – Aaron Bertrand Jul 26 '13 at 13:18
  • 3
    Paul, many thanks indeed for your attention in this, and your most informative and authoritative answer. I am much the wiser! I've no doubt you don't begrudge usr the bounty, but it would be my pleasure to reward you likewise, for what its worth, if it's possible to do so. – stovroz Jul 26 '13 at 15:30
  • 3
    @stovroz Yes award it to usr - completely as it should be. Don't worry about the points on my post, I don't answer for that purpose. Thanks for the interesting question! – Paul White Jul 26 '13 at 16:29
11

Note: I ran into this question long after others have already provided generally correct answers. I decided to post this as a separate answer only because I think the workaround can be helpful, and because you might appreciate having a better insight on the reason EF behaves this way.

Short answer: The best workaround for this issue is to set this flag on your DbContext instance:

context.Configuration.UseDatabaseNullSemantics = true;

When you do this all the extra null checks will go away and your queries should perform faster if the were affected by this issue.

Long answer: others in this thread are right that in EF6 we have introduced the extra null checking terms by default to compensate for differences between the semantics of null comparisons in the database (three-valued logic) and standard in-memory null comparisons. The goal of this is to satisfy the following very popular request:

Incorrect handling of null variables in 'where' clause

Paul White is also right that the in the following expression the 'AND NOT' part is less common in for compensating for three-valued logic:

((x = y) AND NOT (x IS NULL OR y IS NULL)) OR (x IS NULL AND y IS NULL)

That extra condition is necessary in the general case to prevent the result from the whole expression to be NULL, e.g. assume that x = 1 and y = NULL. Then

(x = y) --> NULL 
(x IS NULL AND y IS NULL) --> false
NULL OR false --> NULL

The distinction between NULL and false is important in case the comparison expression is negated at a later point in the composition of the query expression, e.g.:

NOT (false) --> true 
NOT (NULL) --> NULL

It is also true that we could potentially add the smarts to EF to figure out when this extra term is unnecessary (e.g. if we know that the expression isn't negated in the predicate of the query) and to optimize it out of the query.

By the way, we are tracking this issue in the following EF bug at codeplex:

[Performance] Reduce the expression tree for complex queries in case of C# null comparison semantics

  • context.Configuration.UseDatabaseNullSemantics = true should have been the default not the exception. This causes fairly simple queries to often times ignore indexes and blow up causing deadlocks and timeouts in production environments. Yet another prime example that the programmers at Microsoft just don't get it. You don't abritrarily change the expected default functionality EVER! – Mark Aug 4 '14 at 14:20
3

Linq-to-SQL will generate the equivalent SQL query for your Linq code. What that means is that it will filter in the same order you specify. It doesn't really have a way to know which will be faster without running it to test.

Either way round, your first filtering will be operating on the whole dataset, and will therefore be slow. However...

  • If you filter on the rare condition first, then it can cut the whole table down to a small set of results. Then your second filtering has only a small set to work on, which doesn't take long.
  • If you filter on the common condition first, then the set of data left afterwards is still quite large. The second filtering therefore operates on a large set of data, and therefore takes a little longer.

So, rare first means slow + fast, while common first means slow + slow. The only way for Linq-to-SQL to optimise this distinction away for you is to first make a query to check which of the two conditions is rarer, but this means that the generated SQL would either be different each time you ran it (and therefore couldn't be cached to speed it up) or would be significantly more complex than what you wrote in Linq (which the Linq-to-SQL designers didn't want, probably because it could make debugging a nightmare for the user).

There's nothing to stop you from making this optimisation yourself though; add a query beforehand to count and see which of the two filters will produce a smaller result set for the second filter to work on. For small databases, this will be slower in almost every case because you're making a whole extra query, but if your database is big enough and your check query is clever it might end up being faster on average. Also, it might be possible to work out how many there would have to be of condition A for it to be faster regardless of how many condition B objects you have, and then just count condition A, which would help make the check query faster.

  • The question has been quite substantially altered since I wrote this about a month ago, but I'm leaving the answer as it is, because it covers some information that may be useful to future visitors. – anaximander Jul 25 '13 at 8:01
-1

When tuning SQL queries it certainly matters what order you filter your results in. Why would you expect Linq-to-SQL to never be affected by the order of filtering?

  • 3
    It is generally assumed that the way you write a query does not affect performance, at least in simple cases, because the optimizer reorders stuff. If you think that is not the case you should elaborate on that. -1 – usr Jul 24 '13 at 15:14
  • @usr you said it yourself... "at least in simple cases".. you prove my point by your lack of faith in your statement. – Kevin Jul 24 '13 at 15:46
  • 1
    What I'm saying is that your answer, although correct, does not add any insight into the problem. – usr Jul 24 '13 at 15:48
  • @usr wow... I just scrolled up and looked at the question... when I submitted my answer (almost a month ago) the question was quite different. I agree that my answer isn't now particularly useful but I disagree with your downvote... just for that I'm upvoting your answer! +1 – Kevin Jul 24 '13 at 15:57

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