I would like to understand how the built-in function property works. What confuses me is that property can also be used as a decorator, but it only takes arguments when used as a built-in function and not when used as a decorator.

This example is from the documentation:

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    def getx(self):
        return self._x
    def setx(self, value):
        self._x = value
    def delx(self):
        del self._x
    x = property(getx, setx, delx, "I'm the 'x' property.")

property's arguments are getx, setx, delx and a doc string.

In the code below property is used as decorator. The object of it is the x function, but in the code above there is no place for an object function in the arguments.

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    @property
    def x(self):
        """I'm the 'x' property."""
        return self._x

    @x.setter
    def x(self, value):
        self._x = value

    @x.deleter
    def x(self):
        del self._x

And, how are the x.setter and x.deleter decorators created? I am confused.

  • 4
    See also: How do Python properties work? – Martin Thoma Feb 3 '15 at 8:24
  • 1
    property is actually a class (not a function), although it does probably does call the __init__() method when you make an object, of course. Using help(property) from the terminal is insightful. help is also a class for some reason. – Shule Dec 8 '16 at 8:17
up vote 745 down vote accepted

The property() function returns a special descriptor object:

>>> property()
<property object at 0x10ff07940>

It is this object that has extra methods:

>>> property().getter
<built-in method getter of property object at 0x10ff07998>
>>> property().setter
<built-in method setter of property object at 0x10ff07940>
>>> property().deleter
<built-in method deleter of property object at 0x10ff07998>

These act as decorators too. They return a new property object:

>>> property().getter(None)
<property object at 0x10ff079f0>

that is a copy of the old object, but with one of the functions replaced.

Remember, that the @decorator syntax is just syntactic sugar; the syntax:

@property
def foo(self): return self._foo

really means the same thing as

def foo(self): return self._foo
foo = property(foo)

so foo the function is replaced by property(foo), which we saw above is a special object. Then when you use @foo.setter(), what you are doing is call that property().setter method I showed you above, which returns a new copy of the property, but this time with the setter function replaced with the decorated method.

The following sequence also creates a full-on property, by using those decorator methods.

First we create some functions and a property object with just a getter:

>>> def getter(self): print 'Get!'
... 
>>> def setter(self, value): print 'Set to {!r}!'.format(value)
... 
>>> def deleter(self): print 'Delete!'
... 
>>> prop = property(getter)
>>> prop.fget is getter
True
>>> prop.fset is None
True
>>> prop.fdel is None
True

Next we use the .setter() method to add a setter:

>>> prop = prop.setter(setter)
>>> prop.fget is getter
True
>>> prop.fset is setter
True
>>> prop.fdel is None
True

Last we add a deleter with the .deleter() method:

>>> prop = prop.deleter(deleter)
>>> prop.fget is getter
True
>>> prop.fset is setter
True
>>> prop.fdel is deleter
True

Last but not least, the property object acts as a descriptor object, so it has .__get__(), .__set__() and .__delete__() methods to hook into instance attribute getting, setting and deleting:

>>> class Foo(object): pass
... 
>>> prop.__get__(Foo(), Foo)
Get!
>>> prop.__set__(Foo(), 'bar')
Set to 'bar'!
>>> prop.__delete__(Foo())
Delete!

The Descriptor Howto includes a pure python sample implementation of the property() type:

class Property(object):
    "Emulate PyProperty_Type() in Objects/descrobject.c"

    def __init__(self, fget=None, fset=None, fdel=None, doc=None):
        self.fget = fget
        self.fset = fset
        self.fdel = fdel
        if doc is None and fget is not None:
            doc = fget.__doc__
        self.__doc__ = doc

    def __get__(self, obj, objtype=None):
        if obj is None:
            return self
        if self.fget is None:
            raise AttributeError("unreadable attribute")
        return self.fget(obj)

    def __set__(self, obj, value):
        if self.fset is None:
            raise AttributeError("can't set attribute")
        self.fset(obj, value)

    def __delete__(self, obj):
        if self.fdel is None:
            raise AttributeError("can't delete attribute")
        self.fdel(obj)

    def getter(self, fget):
        return type(self)(fget, self.fset, self.fdel, self.__doc__)

    def setter(self, fset):
        return type(self)(self.fget, fset, self.fdel, self.__doc__)

    def deleter(self, fdel):
        return type(self)(self.fget, self.fset, fdel, self.__doc__)
  • 8
    Very good. You could add the fact that after Foo.prop = prop you can do Foo().prop = 5; pront Foo().prop; del Foo().prop with the desired outcome. – glglgl Jun 27 '13 at 7:25
  • 9
    Method objects are created on the fly and can reuse the same memory location if available. – Martijn Pieters Jun 12 '14 at 19:15
  • 1
    @MarkusMeskanen: I rather use type() as accessing dunder attributes and methods are meant to be used as extension points by the standard functions and operators. – Martijn Pieters Mar 10 '15 at 21:46
  • 2
    @MarkusMeskanen: because the object is immutable, and if you mutated it in place you could not specialise it in a subclass. – Martijn Pieters Jun 13 '15 at 14:25
  • 5
    @MarkusMeskanen: see Python overriding getter without setter; if @human.name.getter altered the property object in-place rather than return a new, the human.name attribute would be altered, changing the behaviour of that superclass. – Martijn Pieters Jun 13 '15 at 14:33

Documentation says it's just a shortcut for creating readonly properties. So

@property
def x(self):
    return self._x

is equivalent to

def getx(self):
    return self._x
x = property(getx)

The first part is simple:

@property
def x(self): ...

is the same as

def x(self): ...
x = property(x)
  • which, in turn, is the simplified syntax for creating a property with just a getter.

The next step would be to extend this property with a setter and a deleter. And this happens with the appropriate methods:

@x.setter
def x(self, value): ...

returns a new property which inherits everything from the old x plus the given setter.

x.deleter works the same way.

Here is a minimal example of how @property can be implemented:

class Thing:
    def __init__(self, my_word):
        self._word = my_word 
    @property
    def word(self):
        return self._word

>>> print( Thing('ok').word )
'ok'

Otherwise word remains a method instead of a property.

class Thing:
    def __init__(self, my_word):
        self._word = my_word
    def word(self):
        return self._word

>>> print( Thing('ok').word() )
'ok'
  • 1
    How would this example look if the word() function/property needed to be defined in init ? – J.J Apr 9 '17 at 9:51
  • Can someone please explain why I would create a property decorator here, instead of just having self.word = my_word -- which would then work the same way print( Thing('ok').word ) = 'ok' – SilverSlash Jun 9 '17 at 4:41
  • 1
    @SilverSlash This is just a simple example, a real use-case would involve a more complicated method – AlexG Jun 9 '17 at 16:22
  • Very good. By reading the other answers and going through your example, I finally understand it. Thanks for this ! – Arun Das Jun 12 '17 at 23:40
  • 1
    The best illustration I have ever read. – JawSaw Nov 5 '17 at 4:43

This following:

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    @property
    def x(self):
        """I'm the 'x' property."""
        return self._x

    @x.setter
    def x(self, value):
        self._x = value

    @x.deleter
    def x(self):
        del self._x

Is the same as:

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    def _x_get(self):
        return self._x

    def _x_set(self, value):
        self._x = value

    def _x_del(self):
        del self._x

    x = property(_x_get, _x_set, _x_del, 
                    "I'm the 'x' property.")

Is the same as:

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    def _x_get(self):
        return self._x

    def _x_set(self, value):
        self._x = value

    def _x_del(self):
        del self._x

    x = property(_x_get, doc="I'm the 'x' property.")
    x = x.setter(_x_set)
    x = x.deleter(_x_del)

Is the same as:

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    def _x_get(self):
        return self._x
    x = property(_x_get, doc="I'm the 'x' property.")

    def _x_set(self, value):
        self._x = value
    x = x.setter(_x_set)

    def _x_del(self):
        del self._x
    x = x.deleter(_x_del)

Which is the same as :

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    @property
    def x(self):
        """I'm the 'x' property."""
        return self._x

    @x.setter
    def x(self, value):
        self._x = value

    @x.deleter
    def x(self):
        del self._x

I read all the posts here and realized that we may need a real life example, Why, actually, we have @property? So, consider a Flask app where you use authentication system. You declare a model User in models.py:

class User(UserMixin, db.Model):
    __tablename__ = 'users'
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    email = db.Column(db.String(64), unique=True, index=True)
    username = db.Column(db.String(64), unique=True, index=True)
    password_hash = db.Column(db.String(128))

    ...

    @property
    def password(self):
        raise AttributeError('password is not a readable attribute')

    @password.setter
    def password(self, password):
        self.password_hash = generate_password_hash(password)

    def verify_password(self, password):
        return check_password_hash(self.password_hash, password)

In this code we've "hidden" attribute password by using @property which triggers AttributeError assertion when you try to access it directly, while we used @property.setter to set the actual instance variable password_hash.

Now in auth/views.py we can instantiate a User with:

...
@auth.route('/register', methods=['GET', 'POST'])
def register():
    form = RegisterForm()
    if form.validate_on_submit():
        user = User(email=form.email.data,
                    username=form.username.data,
                    password=form.password.data)
        db.session.add(user)
        db.session.commit()
...

Notice attribute password that comes from a registration form when a user fills the form. Password confirmation happens on the front end with EqualTo('password', message='Passwords must match') (in case if you are wondering, but it's a different topic related Flask forms).

I hope this example will be useful

A property can be declared in two ways.

  • Creating the getter, setter methods for an attribute and then passing these as argument to property function
  • Using the @property decorator.

You can have a look at few examples I have written about properties in python.

Here is another example:

##
## Python Properties Example
##
class GetterSetterExample( object ):
    ## Set the default value for x ( we reference it using self.x, set a value using self.x = value )
    __x = None


##
## On Class Initialization - do something... if we want..
##
def __init__( self ):
    ## Set a value to __x through the getter / setter... Since __x is defined above, this doesn't need to be set...
    self.x = 1234

    return None


##
## Define x as a property, ie a getter - All getters should have a default value arg, so I added it - it will not be passed in when setting a value, so you need to set the default here so it will be used..
##
@property
def x( self, _default = None ):
    ## I added an optional default value argument as all getters should have this - set it to the default value you want to return...
    _value = ( self.__x, _default )[ self.__x == None ]

    ## Debugging - so you can see the order the calls are made...
    print( '[ Test Class ] Get x = ' + str( _value ) )

    ## Return the value - we are a getter afterall...
    return _value


##
## Define the setter function for x...
##
@x.setter
def x( self, _value = None ):
    ## Debugging - so you can see the order the calls are made...
    print( '[ Test Class ] Set x = ' + str( _value ) )

    ## This is to show the setter function works.... If the value is above 0, set it to a negative value... otherwise keep it as is ( 0 is the only non-negative number, it can't be negative or positive anyway )
    if ( _value > 0 ):
        self.__x = -_value
    else:
        self.__x = _value


##
## Define the deleter function for x...
##
@x.deleter
def x( self ):
    ## Unload the assignment / data for x
    if ( self.__x != None ):
        del self.__x


##
## To String / Output Function for the class - this will show the property value for each property we add...
##
def __str__( self ):
    ## Output the x property data...
    print( '[ x ] ' + str( self.x ) )


    ## Return a new line - technically we should return a string so it can be printed where we want it, instead of printed early if _data = str( C( ) ) is used....
    return '\n'

##
##
##
_test = GetterSetterExample( )
print( _test )

## For some reason the deleter isn't being called...
del _test.x

Basically, the same as the C( object ) example except I'm using x instead... I also don't initialize in __init - ... well.. I do, but it can be removed because __x is defined as part of the class....

The output is:

[ Test Class ] Set x = 1234
[ Test Class ] Get x = -1234
[ x ] -1234

and if I comment out the self.x = 1234 in init then the output is:

[ Test Class ] Get x = None
[ x ] None

and if I set the _default = None to _default = 0 in the getter function ( as all getters should have a default value but it isn't passed in by the property values from what I've seen so you can define it here, and it actually isn't bad because you can define the default once and use it everywhere ) ie: def x( self, _default = 0 ):

[ Test Class ] Get x = 0
[ x ] 0

Note: The getter logic is there just to have the value be manipulated by it to ensure it is manipulated by it - the same for the print statements...

Note: I'm used to Lua and being able to dynamically create 10+ helpers when I call a single function and I made something similar for Python without using properties and it works to a degree, but, even though the functions are being created before being used, there are still issues at times with them being called prior to being created which is strange as it isn't coded that way... I prefer the flexibility of Lua meta-tables and the fact I can use actual setters / getters instead of essentially directly accessing a variable... I do like how quickly some things can be built with Python though - for instance gui programs. although one I am designing may not be possible without a lot of additional libraries - if I code it in AutoHotkey I can directly access the dll calls I need, and the same can be done in Java, C#, C++, and more - maybe I haven't found the right thing yet but for that project I may switch from Python..

Note: The code output in this forum is broken - I had to add spaces to the first part of the code for it to work - when copy / pasting ensure you convert all spaces to tabs.... I use tabs for Python because in a file which is 10,000 lines the filesize can be 512KB to 1MB with spaces and 100 to 200KB with tabs which equates to a massive difference for file size, and reduction in processing time...

Tabs can also be adjusted per user - so if you prefer 2 spaces width, 4, 8 or whatever you can do it meaning it is thoughtful for developers with eye-sight deficits.

Note: All of the functions defined in the class aren't indented properly because of a bug in the forum software - ensure you indent it if you copy / paste

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