90

I'm trying to create for the first time a Postgres database, so this is probably a stupid question. I assigned basic read-only permissions to the db role that must access the database from my php scripts, and I have a curiosity: if I execute

GRANT some_or_all_privileges ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA schema TO role;

is there any need to execute also

GRANT USAGE ON SCHEMA schema TO role;

?

From documentation:

USAGE: For schemas, allows access to objects contained in the specified schema (assuming that the objects' own privilege requirements are also met). Essentially this allows the grantee to "look up" objects within the schema.

I think that if I can select or manipulate any data contained in the schema, I can access to any objects of the schema itself. Am I wrong? If not, what GRANT USAGE ON SCHEMA is used for? And what does the documentation means exactly with "assuming that the objects' own privilege requirements are also met"?

97

GRANTs on different objects are separate. GRANTing on a database doesn't GRANT rights to the schema within. Similiarly, GRANTing on a schema doesn't grant rights on the tables within.

If you have rights to SELECT from a table, but not the right to see it in the schema that contains it then you can't access the table.

The rights tests are done in order:

Do you have `USAGE` on the schema? 
    No:  Reject access. 
    Yes: Do you also have the appropriate rights on the table? 
        No:  Reject access. 
        Yes: Check column privileges.

Your confusion may arise from the fact that the public schema has a default GRANT of all rights to the role public, which every user/group is a member of. So everyone already has usage on that schema.

The phrase:

(assuming that the objects' own privilege requirements are also met)

Is saying that you must have USAGE on a schema to use objects within it, but having USAGE on a schema is not by itself sufficient to use the objects within the schema, you must also have rights on the objects themselves.

It's like a directory tree. If you create a directory somedir with file somefile within it then set it so that only your own user can access the directory or the file (mode rwx------ on the dir, mode rw------- on the file) then nobody else can list the directory to see that the file exists.

If you were to grant world-read rights on the file (mode rw-r--r--) but not change the directory permissions it'd make no difference. Nobody could see the file in order to read it, because they don't have the rights to list the directory.

If you instead set rwx-r-xr-x on the directory, setting it so people can list and traverse the directory but not changing the file permissions, people could list the file but could not read it because they'd have no access to the file.

You need to set both permissions for people to actually be able to view the file.

Same thing in Pg. You need both schema USAGE rights and object rights to perform an action on an object, like SELECT from a table.

(The analogy falls down a bit in that PostgreSQL doesn't have row-level security yet, so the user can still "see" that the table exists in the schema by SELECTing from pg_class directly. They can't interact with it in any way, though, so it's just the "list" part that isn't quite the same.)

  • 2
    Now it's very clear with the directory example :) I must say this is a problem if you insert some table or row with a superuser, for example when you add postGIS using CREATE EXTENSION. It's more or less the same problem with files created on Linux while you're su. It will be good if there's a sort of sudo -e for statements in pqsl. – Marco Sulla Jun 28 '13 at 8:04
  • 1
    @LucasMalor Well, there's ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES... – Craig Ringer Jun 28 '13 at 8:06
  • Anyway now I realized that GRANT statements not specific for tables are not what I want, since they affect all databases... :s – Marco Sulla Jun 28 '13 at 10:58
  • 1
    @LucasMalor Er... no, they don't. GRANT on a schema affects that schema. GRANT ... ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA ... affects all tables in a schema in a particular database. There are no GRANTs that affect all databases (ok, except GRANTing role membership to a user). – Craig Ringer Jun 28 '13 at 11:02
  • Ah excuse me, I executed the statements when I was logged as "postgres" superuser, and they affected the "postgres" database. I thought that if you run psql without -d db you're operating "outside" any db, but you're always connected to a db and by default you're connected to the db with the same name of your role. db = role = user = group... it's a bit confusing :D – Marco Sulla Jun 28 '13 at 11:55
58

For a production system, you can use this configuration :

--ACCESS DB
REVOKE CONNECT ON DATABASE nova FROM PUBLIC;
GRANT  CONNECT ON DATABASE nova  TO user;

--ACCESS SCHEMA
REVOKE ALL     ON SCHEMA public FROM PUBLIC;
GRANT  USAGE   ON SCHEMA public  TO user;

--ACCESS TABLES
REVOKE ALL ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA public FROM PUBLIC ;
GRANT SELECT                         ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA public TO read_only ;
GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA public TO read_write ;
GRANT ALL                            ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA public TO admin ;
  • Shouldn't admin also be granted CREATE on the schema? – Dan May 9 '16 at 12:52
  • 2
    The access are allocated according to a hierarchical model : BD --> SCHEMA --> TABLES . With GRANT USAGE ON SCHEMA , the admin user can't create table but he can do it with ALL GRANT ALL ON SCHEMA .... – bilelovitch May 10 '16 at 15:14
  • @bilelovitch: you mean grant all on schema public to admin? PS: I added also grant usage, select on all sequences in schema public to read_only/read_write; grant execute on all functions in schema public to read_only/read_write; – Marco Sulla Jul 19 at 14:13
0

Well, this is my final solution for a simple db, for Linux:

# Read this before!
#
# * roles in postgres are users, and can be used also as group of users
# * $ROLE_LOCAL will be the user that access the db for maintenance and
#   administration. $ROLE_REMOTE will be the user that access the db from the webapp
# * you have to change '$ROLE_LOCAL', '$ROLE_REMOTE' and '$DB'
#   strings with your desired names
# * it's preferable that $ROLE_LOCAL == $DB

#-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

//----------- SKIP THIS PART UNTIL POSTGRES JDBC ADDS SCRAM - START ----------//

cd /etc/postgresql/$VERSION/main
sudo cp pg_hba.conf pg_hba.conf_bak
sudo -e pg_hba.conf

# change all `md5` with `scram-sha-256`
# save and exit

//------------ SKIP THIS PART UNTIL POSTGRES JDBC ADDS SCRAM - END -----------//

sudo -u postgres psql

# in psql:
create role $ROLE_LOCAL login createdb;
\password $ROLE_LOCAL
create role $ROLE_REMOTE login;
\password $ROLE_REMOTE

create database $DB owner $ROLE_LOCAL encoding "utf8";
\connect $DB

# Create all tables and objects, and after that:

revoke connect on database $DB from public;
revoke all on schema public from public;
revoke all on all tables in schema public from public;

grant connect on database $DB to $ROLE_LOCAL;
grant all on schema public to $ROLE_LOCAL;
grant all on all tables in schema public to $ROLE_LOCAL;
grant all on all sequences in schema public to $ROLE_LOCAL;
grant all on all functions in schema public to $ROLE_LOCAL;

grant connect on database $DB to $ROLE_REMOTE;
grant usage on schema public to $ROLE_REMOTE;
grant select, insert, update, delete on all tables in schema public to $ROLE_REMOTE;
grant usage, select on all sequences in schema public to $ROLE_REMOTE;
grant execute on all functions in schema public to $ROLE_REMOTE;

alter default privileges for role $ROLE_LOCAL in schema public
    grant all on tables to $ROLE_LOCAL;

alter default privileges for role $ROLE_LOCAL in schema public
    grant all on sequences to $ROLE_LOCAL;

alter default privileges for role $ROLE_LOCAL in schema public
    grant all on functions to $ROLE_LOCAL;

alter default privileges for role $ROLE_REMOTE in schema public
    grant select, insert, update, delete on tables to $ROLE_REMOTE;

alter default privileges for role $ROLE_REMOTE in schema public
    grant usage, select on sequences to $ROLE_REMOTE;

alter default privileges for role $ROLE_REMOTE in schema public
    grant execute on functions to $ROLE_REMOTE;

# CTRL+D

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