3

I have the commit history as below:

* 8cd26ba 2013-06-26 | history server-side (HEAD, noXHR)
* bffd858 2013-06-25 | popups and modals
* d95c5f4 2013-06-21 | Map update for new interaction
...

And when I've already committed '8cd26ba' I've found a bug in modal mechanism and want to fix it. I've tried to amend 'bffd858' (because fix is related to it) as it described here. I've did the following steps:

  1. typed

    $ git rebase -i bffd858
    
  2. git shows me (in nano)

    pick 6fa566b history server-side
    # Rebase bffd858..6fa566b onto bffd858
    #
    # Commands:
    #  p, pick = use commit
    #  r, reword = use commit, but edit the commit message
    #  e, edit = use commit, but stop for amending
    #  s, squash = use commit, but meld into previous commit
    #  f, fixup = like "squash", but discard this commit's log message
    #  x, exec = run command (the rest of the line) using shell
    #
    # If you remove a line here THAT COMMIT WILL BE LOST.
    # However, if you remove everything, the rebase will be aborted.
    #
    
  3. I've replaced 'pick' with 'edit'

  4. git said me:

    Stopped at 8cd26ba... history server-side
    You can amend the commit now, with
    
        git commit --amend
    
    Once you are satisfied with your changes, run
    
        git rebase --continue
    
  5. I've apply my bug-fix and typed

    $ git commit -a --amend
    
  6. typed

    git rebase --continue
    
  7. And then I've found my bug-fix in '8cd26ba' (last commit)!

What have I done wrong?

  • Thanks, Sylvain Defresne, for advice! What was really confusing me is that in original Q&A '~1' part was missed. Devil is in details! – Roman Bekkiev Jun 27 '13 at 13:41
5

Your error is that when you do a rebase, you want to give the id of the parent of the earliest commit you want to modify. In your case, you wanted to modify bffd858, whose parent is d95c5f4 also known as bffd858^ or bffd858~1 (I prefer that last syntax since it works with shell that do interpret ^ as a special character).

You should instead have done:

$ git rebase --interactive bffd858~1

and changed the file so that it read:

pick bffd858 popups and modals
fixup 6fa566b history server-side
# Rebase bffd858..6fa566b onto bffd858
#
# Commands:
#  p, pick = use commit
#  r, reword = use commit, but edit the commit message
#  e, edit = use commit, but stop for amending
#  s, squash = use commit, but meld into previous commit
#  f, fixup = like "squash", but discard this commit's log message
#  x, exec = run command (the rest of the line) using shell
#
# If you remove a line here THAT COMMIT WILL BE LOST.
# However, if you remove everything, the rebase will be aborted.
#

and then saved and closed the file.

Usually the easiest way to apply a bug fix and to correct the history is to:

  1. use git commit --fixup=bffd858 when committing your fix,
  2. use git rebase --interactive --autosquash bffd858~1 to rebase,
  3. save the file one it open, and then wait for the rebase to complete.

Your original commit will then have been patched with the fix.

In your case, you only did a rebase with a single commit that you then amended. The rebase part, just rewinded the history to the point after you submitted your fix (ie. did nothing).

  • I'd move the last paragraph to the top, since it clearly answers the OP's question. Nice advice! – John Szakmeister Jun 27 '13 at 9:46
  • Good idea, done. – Sylvain Defresne Jun 27 '13 at 9:58
  • Note that <rev>^[n] and <rev>~[n] syntax constructs are not the same if n > 1 – kostix Jun 27 '13 at 10:17
1

I would do it this way:

Write a proper "fix commit".

Then either - leave it as is. It's sometimes good enough. If it's all published, it really is the only good option you have.

Or. Do git rebase -i <commit to fix>^ - one earlier than the one you want to fix. Then edit the file: move your "fix commit" up so it is exactly after the one you want to fix. Then either replace "pick" with "squash" to apply fix to that commit and edit commit message or "fixup" to apply fix and leave message as it is.

0

You got exactly what you asked. You edited the 'history server-side' commit while in thext you said you intended the one before!

The process itself would have worked if you start rebase from one commit earlier and edit the actually intended one.

But the more convenient way is to just make your fix on the top, commit it with 'Fixup! ', and eventually start interactive rebase from down under. With auto-squash being the default it automatically makes to todo list moving the fixups to proper place and mark them fixup. (Similar for squash!). Certainly you can edit the todo manually.

Then just execute. This way is simpler to reproduce if something does not get as intended, the work done in edit is easy to lose.

0

@aragaer answered this but I wanted to clarify for laymen.

I was dogged for so long stupidly doing the following because no one told me at work and could not find workflow basics that discussed this. I used to do git rebase -i HEAD~# to move an old commit to HEAD, potentially fixing conflicts along the way, performing a commit amend, then rebasing again to move the commit back to its original location in history, potentially fixing conflicts again. Works but wrong answer. What a nightmare. I'm surprised http://git-scm.com doesn't discuss this, it's so basic. If it does, I missed it.

The answer is simple:

  1. Make your new commit with the changes you want to apply to an older commit.
  2. Do git rebase -i HEAD~10 or however far back you need to go which is usually fine. If you happen to know the commit SHA, use @aragaer's answer above.
  3. Move your commit to just below the old commit you want to squash it with.
  4. Then either apply squash or fix your new commit.

Done.

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