41

The Problem

I have a multidimensional array similar to the one below. What I'm trying to achieve is a way to find and retrieve from the array the one with the highest "Total" value, now I know there's a function called max but that doesn't work with a multidimensional array like this.

What I've thought about doing is creating a foreach loop and building a new array with only the totals, then using max to find the max value, which would work, the only issue would then be retrieving the rest of the data which relates to that max value. I'm not sure that's the most efficient way either.

Any ideas?

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [Key1] => Key1
            [Total] => 13
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [Key2] => Key2
            [Total] => 117
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [Key3] => Key3
            [Total] => 39
        )
)
1
  • If you do not need such a performance - two loops will be good. If you want huge performance gain in arrays with really a lot of elements you should use Interval Trees(Segment Trees) to store values. But this is a huge theory and may not be needed in your case. Commented Jun 27, 2013 at 9:38

9 Answers 9

101

Since PHP 5.5 you can use array_column to get an array of values for specific key, and max it.

max(array_column($array, 'Total'))

1
  • 1
    This is optimized for code brevity, not performance. Calling array_column() then max() means two full loops over the data. As demonstrated by Robert's answer, the task can be completed by a single iteration over the data. Also, the asker says: the only issue would then be retrieving the rest of the data which relates to that max value Commented Jul 22, 2022 at 21:30
31

Just do a simple loop and compare values or use array_reduce. @ is an error suppressor; it hides the fact that $a['total'] is not declared before it is accessed on the first iteration. Demo

$data = array_reduce($data, function ($a, $b) {
    return @$a['Total'] > $b['Total'] ? $a : $b ;
});

print_r($data);
// Array( [Key2] => Key2 [Total] => 117 )

It could also be written with arrow function syntax which has been avaiable since PHP7.4. Demo

var_export(
    array_reduce(
        $data,
        fn($result, $row) =>
            $result['Total'] > $row['Total']
            ? $result
            : $row,
        ['Key1' => null, 'Total' => PHP_INT_MIN]
    )
);
// array ('Key2' => 'Key2', 'Total' => 117,)
3
  • 6
    Although using @ instead of checking if a value really exists is bad practice, this is by far most correct answer. array_reduce is meant for these kind of solutions. Commented Oct 24, 2014 at 9:02
  • If two values are same it return last value, how i can get the first value index? Commented Jan 13, 2020 at 7:10
  • @Harinarayan reverse the order of ghe comparison and branches like this: 3v4l.org/pQHdD Commented Jul 22, 2022 at 21:28
11

It's so basic algorithm.

$max = -9999999; //will hold max val
$found_item = null; //will hold item with max val;

foreach($arr as $k=>$v)
{
    if($v['Total']>$max)
    {
       $max = $v['Total'];
       $found_item = $v;
    }
}

echo "max value is $max";
print_r($found_item);

Working demo

10
  • 2
    Why would you initialise $max with -9999999? Commented Oct 24, 2014 at 9:03
  • You can init it with "$max= ~PHP_INT_MAX;" Check the basics of finding the min number. The other option is to init it with first member of array
    – Robert
    Commented Oct 24, 2014 at 14:07
  • No, my question was why? Commented Oct 27, 2014 at 13:12
  • because you need to have minimal value to compare with first time and you need to be sure that this value is smaller than first element. It could be done also with assiging the first element of array but then I would need to start loop from second element in array.
    – Robert
    Commented Oct 27, 2014 at 15:05
  • 3
    You could always just initialize it as $max = null; then simply add one more condition to check that $max has already been set, like if($v['Total']>$max || !$max). In that case, the first time it runs through the loop and there isn't a $max value defined, it will set one. The assumption is that, even if it's the one and only value, it would technically be the max regardless of whatever arbitrary minimum you've hard coded.
    – Mike
    Commented Jan 25, 2018 at 20:23
9

I know this question is old, but I'm providing the following answer in response to another question that pointed here after being marked as a duplicate. This is another alternative I don't see mentioned in the current answers.

I know there's a function called max but that doesn't work with a multidimensional array like this.

You can get around that with array_column which makes getting the maximum value very easy:

$arr = [['message_id' => 1,
             'points' => 3],
        ['message_id' => 2,
             'points' => 2],
        ['message_id' => 3,
             'points' => 2]];

// max value
$max = max(array_column($arr, 'points'));

Getting the associative key is where it gets a little more tricky, considering that you might actually want multiple keys (if $max matches more than one value). You can do this with an anonymous function inside array_map, and use array_filter to remove the null values:

// keys of max value
$keys = array_filter(array_map(function ($arr) use ($max) {
    return $arr['points'] == $max ? $arr['message_id'] : null;
}, $arr));

Output:

array(1) {
  [0]=>
  int(1)
}

If you do end up with multiples keys but are only interested in the first match found, then simply reference $keys[0].

1
  • Under the hood, this iterates the array twice; once in array_column() and once with max() -- to derive the max value. Robert's answer has a more efficient time complexity. Calling array_map() and array_filter() means two more full traverses of the array. I can't endorse making four loops when something can be done in one loop. Commented Jul 22, 2022 at 21:08
3

another simple method will be

$max  = array_map( function( $arr ) {
  global $last;
  return (int)( ( $arr["Total"] > $last ) ? $arr["Total"] : $last );
}, $array );

print_r( max( $max ) );
1
  • Under the hood, this iterates the array twice; once in array_map() and once with max(). Robert's answer has a more efficient time complexity. Commented Jul 22, 2022 at 21:06
2
<?php
$myarray = array(
    0 => array(
        'Key1' => 'Key1',
        'Total' => 13,
    ),
    1 => array(
        'Key2' => 'Key2',
        'Total' => 117,
    ),
    2 => array(
        'Key2' => 'Key3',
        'Total' => 39,
    ),
);

$out = array();
foreach ($myarray as $item) {
    $out[] = $item['Total'];
}

echo max($out); //117

unset($out, $item);
1
  • 1
    Under the hood, this iterates the array twice; once in foreach() and once with max(). Robert's answer has a more efficient time complexity. Commented Jul 22, 2022 at 21:07
1

Can be done using array_walk(array_walk_recursive if needed)

$arr is the array you want to search in

$largestElement = null;

array_walk($arr, function(&$item, $key) use (&$largestElement) {
    if (!is_array($largestElement) || $largestElement["Total"] < $item["Total"]) {
        $largestElement = $item;
    }
});
1

You can use php usort function: http://php.net/manual/en/function.usort.php

A pretty illustrative example is given here:

<?php
function cmp($a, $b)
{
 return strcmp($a["fruit"], $b["fruit"]);
}

$fruits[0]["fruit"] = "lemons";
$fruits[1]["fruit"] = "apples";
$fruits[2]["fruit"] = "grapes";

usort($fruits, "cmp");

while (list($key, $value) = each($fruits)) {
 echo "\$fruits[$key]: " . $value["fruit"] . "\n";
}
?>

So it will sort the max value to the last array index.

Output:

$fruits[0]: apples
$fruits[1]: grapes
$fruits[2]: lemons

This example is given on aforementioned link

3
  • 1
    I wouldn't recommend using a complex sort algorithm for something like getting a single value out of an array. Actually, sorting should only be done when really needed. The additional overhead isn't worth a "cool-looking" solution. Commented Oct 11, 2016 at 8:09
  • @MarcelloMönkemeyer what exactly is the additional overhead which you are referring here? To get a single value(max or min) whole array needs to be traversed (by comparing). The function above also does the same thing, unless i am missing something here!
    – Umair Khan
    Commented Oct 12, 2016 at 15:25
  • 1
    The actual sorting, because it requires multiple traversals and comparisons as well as repeatedly moving and repositioning array keys. Depending on the implemented sorting algorithm (unfortunately, I don't know which one PHP uses), this can grow exponential. It may not be of any visible difference for small arrays and when used few times, but imagine it being constantly used in a framework like Symfony or Laravel - that'd be a huge bummer. Commented Oct 13, 2016 at 13:48
0

array_reduce accepts a 3rd "initial" parameter. Use this to avoid the bad practice of using "@" error suppression :

$data = array_reduce($data, function ($a, $b) {
    return $a['Total'] > $b['Total'] ? $a : $b ;
},['Total' => 0]);

print_r($data);

PHP 7.4

$data = array_reduce($data, fn(a,b) => $a['Total'] > $b['Total'] ? $a : $b, ['Total' => 0]);

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