709

PHP treats all arrays as associative, so there aren't any built in functions. Can anyone recommend a fairly efficient way to check if an array contains only numeric keys?

Basically, I want to be able to differentiate between this:

$sequentialArray = array('apple', 'orange', 'tomato', 'carrot');

and this:

$assocArray = array('fruit1' => 'apple', 
                    'fruit2' => 'orange', 
                    'veg1' => 'tomato', 
                    'veg2' => 'carrot');
  • 297
    There's a bug in your code: Tomato is a fruit. – Olle Härstedt Mar 2 '16 at 14:19
  • 4
    This method has caveats, but often I just do if (isset($array[0])), which is simple and fast. Of course, you should first be sure the array isn't empty, and you should have some knowledge on the possible contents of the array so that the method couldn't fail (like mixed numeric/associative, or non-sequential). – Gras Double Mar 12 '16 at 17:58

50 Answers 50

0

Yet another way to do this.

function array_isassociative($array)
{
    // Create new Array,  Make it the same size as the input array
    $compareArray = array_pad(array(), count($array), 0);

    // Compare the two array_keys
    return (count(array_diff_key($array, $compareArray))) ? true : false;

}
0
function is_associative($arr) {
  return (array_merge($arr) !== $arr || count(array_filter($arr, 'is_string', ARRAY_FILTER_USE_KEY)) > 0);
}
  • implode takes 2 arguments, plus, that function would return false for an array defined like this: $x = array("1" => "b", "0" => "a"); – nickf Oct 6 '08 at 7:20
  • 2
    The glue parameter of implode() became optional in PHP 4.3.0. Your example array -- $x = array("1" => "b", "0" => "a"); -- has an associative index of non-sequential strings. is_associative() will return true for that array, as expected. – scronide Oct 6 '08 at 7:56
  • 1
    I like this one. The first conditional will detect associative arrays where numeric indices are not numerically sequential, or where the first index is not "0", because array_merge will re-index keys of a numerically indexed (but possibly associative) array. – DWright Nov 10 '10 at 18:30
  • 1
    -1; this uses O(n) additional memory when $arr has n items, plus there's no explanation of what it does nor exploration of the ambiguity of the question that was asked. It also treats an array that has sequential numeric keys and the empty string as a key as non-associative, which defies any sane definition one might draw up between an 'associative' and 'sequential' array. – Mark Amery Jan 6 '16 at 23:49
  • @MarkAmery Interesting point about the empty string as a key. – scronide Jan 7 '16 at 0:25
0

Or you can just use this:

Arr::isAssoc($array)

which will check if array contains any non-numeric key or:

Arr:isAssoc($array, true)

to check if array is strictly sequencial (contains auto generated int keys 0 to n-1)

using this library.

0

I've come up with next method:

function isSequential(array $list): bool
{
    $i = 0;
    $count = count($list);
    while (array_key_exists($i, $list)) {
        $i += 1;
        if ($i === $count) {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}


var_dump(isSequential(array())); // false
var_dump(isSequential(array('a', 'b', 'c'))); // true
var_dump(isSequential(array("0" => 'a', "1" => 'b', "2" => 'c'))); // true
var_dump(isSequential(array("1" => 'a', "0" => 'b', "2" => 'c'))); // true
var_dump(isSequential(array("1a" => 'a', "0b" => 'b', "2c" => 'c'))); // false
var_dump(isSequential(array("a" => 'a', "b" => 'b', "c" => 'c'))); // false

*Note empty array is not considered a sequential array, but I think it's fine since empty arrays is like 0 - doesn't matter it's plus or minus, it's empty.

Here are the advantages of this method compared to some listed above:

  • It does not involve copying of arrays (someone mentioned in this gist https://gist.github.com/Thinkscape/1965669 that array_values does not involve copying - what!?? It certainly does - as will be seen below)
  • It's faster for bigger arrays and more memory friendly at the same time

I've used benchmark kindly provided by Artur Bodera, where I changed one of the arrays to 1M elements (array_fill(0, 1000000, uniqid()), // big numeric array).

Here are the results for 100 iterations:

PHP 7.1.16 (cli) (built: Mar 31 2018 02:59:59) ( NTS )

Initial memory: 32.42 MB
Testing my_method (isset check) - 100 iterations
  Total time: 2.57942 s
  Total memory: 32.48 MB

Testing method3 (array_filter of keys) - 100 iterations
  Total time: 5.10964 s
  Total memory: 64.42 MB

Testing method1 (array_values check) - 100 iterations
  Total time: 3.07591 s
  Total memory: 64.42 MB

Testing method2 (array_keys comparison) - 100 iterations
  Total time: 5.62937 s
  Total memory: 96.43 MB

*Methods are ordered based on their memory consumption

**I used echo " Total memory: " . number_format(memory_get_peak_usage()/1024/1024, 2) . " MB\n"; to display memory usage

  • if you /1024 the unit is MiB (Mebibyte) if you /1000 the unit is MB (Megabyte). Mega === 1000000, in software engineering and in phsyics, on the moon and on the earth and also inside your computer. Mega is never 1024*1024. And Kilo is always 1000, not 1024. – DanFromGermany Mar 15 at 16:33
  • wow @DanFromGermany, thanks for you incredibly useful comment! That is good to know. PS. by the way in fact Mega is exactly 1024*1024 inside my computer, it's a non standard one :) – Slayer Birden Mar 16 at 17:58
-1

One cheap and dirty way would be to check like this:

isset($myArray[count($myArray) - 1])

...you might get a false positive if your array is like this:

$myArray = array("1" => "apple", "b" => "banana");

A more thorough way might be to check the keys:

function arrayIsAssociative($myArray) {
    foreach (array_keys($myArray) as $ind => $key) {
        if (!is_numeric($key) || (isset($myArray[$ind + 1]) && $myArray[$ind + 1] != $key + 1)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
// this will only return true if all the keys are numeric AND sequential, which
// is what you get when you define an array like this:
// array("a", "b", "c", "d", "e");

or

function arrayIsAssociative($myArray) {
    $l = count($myArray);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $l, ++$i) {
        if (!isset($myArray[$i])) return true;
    }
    return false;
}
// this will return a false positive on an array like this:
$x = array(1 => "b", 0 => "a", 2 => "c", 4 => "e", 3 => "d");
  • +1 for the isset method. Yes, it's dirty, but it's the only method that's O(1) instead of O(n). – TinkerTank Jun 24 '12 at 17:47
  • 1
    The thorough arrayIsAssociative() returns true for both array("a", "b", "c") and array("a", "b"=>"b", "c"), but false for both array("a") and array(2=>"a"). – Pang Nov 23 '12 at 1:50
-1

I met this problem once again some days ago and i thought to take advantage of the array_merge special property:

If the input arrays have the same string keys, then the later value for that key will overwrite the previous one. If, however, the arrays contain numeric keys, the later value will not overwrite the original value, but will be appended. Values in the input array with numeric keys will be renumbered with incrementing keys starting from zero in the result array. So why not to use:

function Is_Indexed_Arr($arr){
    $arr_copy = $arr;
    if((2*count($arr)) == count(array_merge($arr, $arr_copy))){
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}
-1

My solution is to get keys of an array like below and check that if the key is not integer:

private function is_hash($array) {
    foreach($array as $key => $value) {
        return ! is_int($key);
    }
    return false;
}

It is wrong to get array_keys of a hash array like below:

array_keys(array(
       "abc" => "gfb",
       "bdc" => "dbc"
       )
);

will output:

array(
       0 => "abc",
       1 => "bdc"
)

So, it is not a good idea to compare it with a range of numbers as mentioned in top rated answer. It will always say that it is a hash array if you try to compare keys with a range.

  • The question is how to check if an array is sequential though. The array array(1 => 'foo', 0 => 'bar') is not sequential but will pass your test. For why that makes a difference, try json_encode($array) with sequential and associative arrays. – deceze Dec 17 '11 at 5:00
  • yes, i guess i got pretty confused and stuck with the above answers. Which kept comparing array_keys with a range and thought they will have an output which is comparison whether it is a hash or not. So my answer is to them and also to whom thinks that array_keys gives values are sequential. that's all. And also function name is is_hash so yes it doesn't tell you whether it is sequential or not – GO' Dec 19 '11 at 1:26
-1

Actually, I found myself in a similar situation trying to take an array and parse it into XML. XML element names cannot begin with numbers -- and the code snippets I found did not correctly deal with arrays with numeric indexes.

Details on my particular situation are below

The answer provided above by @null ( http:// stackoverflow .com/a/173589/293332 ) was actually pretty darn close. I was dismayed that it got voted down tho: Those who do not understand regex lead very frustrating lives.

Anyway, based upon his answer, here is what I ended up with:

/** 
 * Checks if an array is associative by utilizing REGEX against the keys
 * @param   $arr    <array> Reference to the array to be checked
 * @return  boolean
 */     
private function    isAssociativeArray( &$arr ) {
    return  (bool)( preg_match( '/\D/', implode( array_keys( $arr ) ) ) );
}

See the PCRE Escape Sequences and PCRE Syntax pages for further details.

My Particular Situation

Here is an example array that I am dealing with:

Case A
return  array(
    "GetInventorySummary"  => array(
        "Filters"  => array( 
            "Filter"  => array(
                array(
                    "FilterType"  => "Shape",
                    "FilterValue"  => "W",
                ),
                array(
                    "FilterType"  => "Dimensions",
                    "FilterValue"  => "8 x 10",
                ),
                array(
                    "FilterType"  => "Grade",
                    "FilterValue"  => "A992",
                ),
            ),
        ),
        "SummaryField"  => "Length",
    ),
);

The catch is that the filter key is variable. For example:

Case B
return  array(
    "GetInventorySummary"  => array(
        "Filters"  => array( 
            "Filter"  => array(
                "foo"   =>  "bar",
                "bar"   =>  "foo",
            ),
        ),
        "SummaryField"  => "Length",
    ),
);

Why I Need Assoc. Array Checker

If the array I am transforming is like Case A, what I want returned is:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<GetInventorySummary>
    <Filters>
        <Filter>
            <FilterType>Shape</FilterType>
            <FilterValue>W</FilterValue>
        </Filter>
        <Filter>
            <FilterType>Dimensions</FilterType>
            <FilterValue>8 x 10</FilterValue>
        </Filter>
        <Filter>
            <FilterType>Grade</FilterType>
             <FilterValue>A992</FilterValue>
        </Filter>
    </Filters>
    <SummaryField>Length</SummaryField>
</GetInventorySummary>

... However, if the array I am transforming is like Case B, what I want returned is:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<GetInventorySummary>
    <Filters>
        <Filter>
            <foo>bar</foo>
            <bar>foo</bar>
        </Filter>
    </Filters>
    <SummaryField>Length</SummaryField>
</GetInventorySummary>
  • 1
    This isAssociativeArray() returns false for array(4=>"four",9=>"nine"), array("002"=>"two","007"=>"james") and array("a", ""=>"empty", "b"), which are clearly associative. – Pang Nov 24 '12 at 2:45
-1
function is_array_assoc($foo) {
    if (is_array($foo)) {
        return (count(array_filter(array_keys($foo), 'is_string')) > 0);
    }
    return false;
}
  • -1 for the total lack of explanation. Dumping another code sample on a question that has had 42 answers without any explanation of why to prefer it over the alternatives helps absolutely nobody. Also, given the question's ambiguity and the arguments that have raged over it in the comments, some explanation of exactly how you're defining a "associative" or "sequential" array seems necessary here. – Mark Amery Jan 6 '16 at 23:56
-1

Improvement from Mark Amery

function isAssoc($arr)
{
    // Is it set, is an array, not empty and keys are not sequentialy numeric from 0
    return isset($arr) && is_array($arr) && count($arr)!=0 && array_keys($arr) !== range(0, count($arr) - 1);
}

This tests if variable exists, if it is an array, if it is not an empty array and if the keys are not sequential from 0.

To see if the array is associative

if (isAssoc($array)) ...

To see if it numeric

if (!isAssoc($array)) ...
  • Wait, what, where did I contribute this? Or did you mean to say "Improvement on Mark Amery", as in an improvement on the accepted answer that is attributed to me? Please be aware, in the latter case, that I didn't author that answer - my edits to it have simply caused the authorship attribution algorithm for Community Wiki posts to put my name on it. – Mark Amery Jul 21 '16 at 8:10
-1

Checking if array has all assoc-keys. With using stdClass & get_object_vars ^):

$assocArray = array('fruit1' => 'apple', 
                    'fruit2' => 'orange', 
                    'veg1' => 'tomato', 
                    'veg2' => 'carrot');

$assoc_object = (object) $assocArray;
$isAssoc = (count($assocArray) === count (get_object_vars($assoc_object)));  
var_dump($isAssoc); // true

Why? Function get_object_vars returns only accessible properties (see more about what is occuring during converting array to object here). Then, just logically: if count of basic array's elements equals count of object's accessible properties - all keys are assoc.

Few tests:

$assocArray = array('apple', 'orange', 'tomato', 'carrot');
$assoc_object = (object) $assocArray; 
$isAssoc = (count($assocArray) === count (get_object_vars($assoc_object)));
var_dump($isAssoc); // false 
//...

$assocArray = array( 0 => 'apple', 'orange', 'tomato', '4' => 'carrot');
$assoc_object = (object) $assocArray; 
$isAssoc = (count($assocArray) === count (get_object_vars($assoc_object)));
var_dump($isAssoc); // false 

//... 
$assocArray = array('fruit1' => 'apple', 
                    NULL => 'orange', 
                    'veg1' => 'tomato', 
                    'veg2' => 'carrot');

$assoc_object = (object) $assocArray;
$isAssoc = (count($assocArray) === count (get_object_vars($assoc_object)));  
var_dump($isAssoc); //false

Etc.

  • This not work. Proof eval.in/859508 $asocArray is array with two arrays. Return true. Other proofs for others exaqmple also not work how to your latets example eval.in/859507 return true – abkrim Sep 11 '17 at 15:55
-1

This is my function -

public function is_assoc_array($array){

    if(is_array($array) !== true){
        return false;
    }else{

        $check = json_decode(json_encode($array));

        if(is_object($check) === true){
            return true;
        }else{
            return false;
        }

    }

}

Some examples

    print_r((is_assoc_array(['one','two','three']))===true?'Yes':'No'); \\No
    print_r(is_assoc_array(['one'=>'one','two'=>'two','three'=>'three'])?'Yes':'No'); \\Yes
    print_r(is_assoc_array(['1'=>'one','2'=>'two','3'=>'three'])?'Yes':'No'); \\Yes
    print_r(is_assoc_array(['0'=>'one','1'=>'two','2'=>'three'])?'Yes':'No'); \\No

There was a similar solution by @devios1 in one of the answers but this was just another way using the inbuilt json related functions of PHP. I haven't checked how this solution fairs in terms of performance compared to other solutions that have been posted here. But it certainly has helped me solve this problem. Hope this helps.

-1
/*
iszba - Is Zero Based Array

Detects if an array is zero based or not.

PARAMS:
    $chkvfnc
        Callback in the loop allows to check the values of each element.
        Signature:
            bool function chkvfnc($v);
            return:
                true    continue looping
                false   stop looping; iszba returns false too.

NOTES:
○ assert: $array is an array.
○ May be memory efficient;
  it doesn't get extra arrays via array_keys() or ranges() into the function.
○ Is pretty fast without a callback.
○ With callback it's ~2.4 times slower.
*/
function iszba($array, $chkvfnc=null){

    $ncb = !$chkvfnc;
    $i = 0;

    foreach($array as $k => $v){
        if($k === $i++)
            if($ncb || $chkvfnc($v))
                continue;

        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

• Without callback it is ~30% faster than current leading answer, and possibly more memory efficient.

• Just negate the answer to know if the array should be considered associative.

-2
function isAssoc($arr)
{
    $a = array_keys($arr);
    for($i = 0, $t = count($a); $i < $t; $i++)
    {
        if($a[$i] != $i)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
  • this assumes the array is indexed from 0 which is not necessarily true and will give wrong results for arrays like [10=>'x', 20=>'y'] – Gordon Jun 21 '12 at 13:25
  • This function returns true for both array("a"=>"b") and array("a","b"). – Pang Nov 23 '12 at 2:21
-2

Another variant not shown yet, as it's simply not accepting numerical keys, but I like Greg's one very much :

 /* Returns true if $var associative array */  
  function is_associative_array( $array ) {  
    return is_array($array) && !is_numeric(implode('', array_keys($array)));  
  }
  • This function returns false for array(2=>'a',3=>'b'), array('a','b'), array("0x"=>'a','f'=>'g'), array("90"=>'a',"17"=>'b'), array(""=>'b',20=>'c'). – Pang Nov 23 '12 at 2:12
  • @Pang: if you could read : "it's simply not accepting numerical keys,", you could just remove the downvote. Thx. – hornetbzz Nov 26 '12 at 16:56
  • Your is_associative_array() is returning false for associative arrays such as array("0x"=>'a','f'=>'g') and array(""=>'b',20=>'c'). Now, I am confused. – Pang Nov 27 '12 at 1:29
-2

Simple and performance friendly solution which only checks the first key.

function isAssoc($arr = NULL)
{
    if ($arr && is_array($arr))
    {
        foreach ($arr as $key => $val)
        {
            if (is_numeric($key)) { return true; }

            break;
        }
    }

    return false;
}
  • 1
    This function returns true for both array("a", "b") and array("a", "b" => "B") as it only checks the first key (note the return and the break). – Pang Nov 24 '12 at 2:25
-2

Best function to detect associative array (hash array)

<?php
function is_assoc($arr) { return (array_values($arr) !== $arr); }
?>
  • fails for single element associative arrays – Jinu Joseph Daniel Jul 5 '12 at 19:37
  • 3
    Isn't this a duplicate answer ? – Sharique Abdullah Jul 25 '12 at 7:30
  • Can you give an example, Jinu? I don't see this behavior. (Although I use == not ===; I don't know why so many use ===.) – grantwparks Aug 2 '12 at 21:39
-2

In simple way you can check is array is associative or not by below steps

  1. convert all keys of array into one array by using array_keys()
  2. filter out non numeric key from array using array_filter() and is_numeric()
  3. compare number of elements in filtered array and actual array, If number of elements are not equals in both array then it is associative array.

Function for above step is as below.

 function isAssociative(array $array)
    {
        return count(array_filter(array_keys($array), function($v){return is_numeric($v);})) !== count($array));
    }
-3

I just use the key() function. Observe:

<?php
var_dump(key(array('hello'=>'world', 'hello'=>'world'))); //string(5) "hello"
var_dump(key(array('world', 'world')));                  //int(0)
var_dump(key(array("0" => 'a', "1" => 'b', "2" => 'c'))); //int(0) who makes string sequetial keys anyway????
?>

Thus, just by checking for false, you can determine whether an array is associative or not.

  • 1
    No. var_dump((bool)key(array(1=>"foo"))); returns true. -1. – ghoti Jun 19 '12 at 13:54
  • var_dump((bool)key(array("a"=>"foo"))) returns true; var_dump((bool)key(array(""=>"foo"))) returns false. Also, both var_dump((bool)key(array("foo","bar"))) and var_dump((bool)key(array("0"=>"foo","a"=>"bar"))) returns false. – Pang Nov 23 '12 at 1:55
-5

If your looking for just non-numeric keys (no matter the order) then you may want to try

function IsAssociative($array)
{
    return preg_match('/[a-z]/i', implode(array_keys($array)));
}
  • 6
    -1 for missing your apostrophe. Oh, and test with array("@"=>"foo");. And ... preg, really? – ghoti Jun 19 '12 at 14:03

protected by adatapost Jun 21 '13 at 9:22

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