30

How these macros are evaluated?

# define i 20
void fun();

int main(){
  printf("%d",i);
  fun();
  printf("%d",i);
  return 0;
}

void fun(){
  #undef i
  #define i 30
}

gives output as 2020 but whereas,

# define i 20
void fun(){
  #undef i
  #define i 30
}

int main(){
  printf("%d",i);
  fun();
  printf("%d",i);
  return 0;
}

gives output as 3030. Please Explain. Thanks.

2
  • 4
    most compilers have a switch that will allow you to see the preprocessor output (the step between macro expansion and compiling), I suggest you experiment with that Jun 27, 2013 at 20:23
  • 2
    Basically: C and the C preprocessor are totally unrelated languages.
    – Nick T
    Jun 27, 2013 at 21:57

7 Answers 7

60

C Preprocessor works top to bottom irrespective of function calls. It is effective from that point (line) in whatever the file that macro is defined, until corresponding undef or till end of the translation unit.

So, your code would become,

# define i 20
               // from now on, all token i should become 20
void fun();
int main()
{
  printf("%d",i);   // printf("%d",20);
  fun();
  printf("%d",i);   // printf("%d",20);
  return 0;
}
void fun()
{
#undef i
              // from now on, forget token i
#define i 30
              // from now on, all token i should become 30
}

Your second code would become,

# define i 20
               // from now on, all token i should become 20
void fun()
{
#undef i
               // from now on, forget i
#define i 30
               // from now on, all token i should become 30
}
int main()
{
  printf("%d",i);    //  printf("%d",30);
  fun();
  printf("%d",i);    // printf("%d",30);
  return 0;
}
1
  • 19
    Note that despite other answers asserting that there is no scope, C preprocessor macros do have a well-defined scope, but that scope is only relevant to the preprocessing phase, not any other phase of translation. That scope is "From point of definition until the end of the current translation unit, or until the macro is undefined using #undefine or redefined using #define." Jun 27, 2013 at 19:57
17

There's no scope involved at all. Macros are handled at the preprocessing stage separately and independently from the compilation stage and have no concept of a C scope. Your examples could just as easily be:

#define i 20

void fun();

int main()
{
  printf("%d",i);
  fun();
  printf("%d",i);
  return 0;
}

void fun()
{
}

#undef i
#define i 30

And:

#define i 20
#undef i
#define i 30

void fun()
{
}

int main()
{
  printf("%d",i);
  fun();
  printf("%d",i);
  return 0;
}

You can see from those why it behaves the way it does.

2
  • Preprocessing may be semantically separate from other parts of the language, but it is not necessarily separate from the compiler. GCC integrated it years ago. Jun 27, 2013 at 17:34
  • True; I really just meant in a logical sense. That's a good clarification, though.
    – Carl Norum
    Jun 27, 2013 at 17:37
8

Preprocessor symbols most definitely have a scope, but that scope does not interact with the other scopes such as file scope.

Preprocessor symbol scope is confined to a single translation unit. A #define in one translation unit has no bearing on another translation unit.

The scope of a preprocessor symbol is the region of tokens following the directive which #defines that symbol it. Thereafter, occurrences of the macro are recognized and expanded according to the governing rules. Preprocessor macro definitions are not recursive. If the replacement token sequence contains what look like invocations of the symbol that is being defined, those are not recognized as such. This is why the scope begins after the directive. However, this is still true when a macro is redefined; a redefinition is special and must conform to the rule that it is the same as the original definition. (The precise rules for sameness are in the standard).

The scope of a preprocessor symbol ends with the end of the translation unit, or earlier if it is subject to an #undef directive.

Thus the scope of a preprocessor symbol is essentially the region of the translation unit text, regarded as stream of preprocessor tokens, in which that symbol is eligible for recognition and substitution.

1
  • 1
    +1 for pointing out that macros have a scope, just one that is different from the scope of the C language.
    – sleske
    Jun 28, 2013 at 9:22
6

There is simply no scope.

Macros are substituted by the preprocessor. So their expansion is defined by their position in the source, top to bottom.

5

Preprocessor macros have no scope, as they are not part of the C language. Instead it's a kind of search-replace program that is run before the compiler proper runs.

The preprocessor simply goes though any file, doesn't have to be a C source file, and when it finds a macro invocation it simply replaces it with the text in the macro body.

5
  • 3
    Preprocessor macros are part of the C language, in C 2011 clause 6.10.3. Whether preprocessing is performed separately is an implementation detail; some compilers integrate it. Jun 27, 2013 at 17:31
  • 1
    if no scope then suppose i have file1.c which contain MACRO definition #define SOME_MACRO 100 and can i directly use this MACRO in file2.c? i think i gives error at linker stage, so what do you mean by macros have no scope? Apr 30, 2020 at 12:01
  • @user2520119 I mean that it doesn't matter where you define the macro, inside a function, inside a look inside a function, or between or otherwise outside of functions. All macros are global after its definition, but only in the translation unit where it was defined. Apr 30, 2020 at 12:15
  • So what about this code? void func1(void) { printf("func1 : SOME_MACRO : %s\n",SOME_MACRO); } #define SOME_MACRO "I ma here" void func2(void) { printf("func2 : SOME_MACRO : %s\n",SOME_MACRO); } int main() { func1(); func2(); return 0; } Apr 30, 2020 at 12:27
  • @user2520119 That would result in an error because SOME_MACRO isn't defined when you attempt to use it in func1`. Apr 30, 2020 at 12:34
4

Macros take effect on the text of the source, in a separate stage before compiling. The macros no longer exist in any form in the compiled code, and they are not evaluated at runtime.

Whatever macro definition is in effect when the macro is invoked (during a textual scan of the source) will be substituted into the source text.

2

Macros are evaluated during the C preprocessor stage. The C preprocessor stage occurs separately from the compilation stage. Because of this, Macros do not follow regular scope. They are instead evaluated in the order in which they appear in the source file (so from the top to the bottom).

In your first code example it outputs 2020, despite it calling fun() in the main function which supposedly should change the value of i to 30, but because the fun function appears below where it was called, the value does not change as the preprocessor has not reached that point yet.

In your second code example it outputs 3030 because the fun function is above the main function. Therefore the opposite occurs as the preprocessor has already gone through the fun function and changed the value of i to 30

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