311

I'm trying to write a Unit Test for a simple bean that's used in my program to validate forms. The bean is annotated with @Component and has a class variable that is initialized using

@Value("${this.property.value}") private String thisProperty;

I would like to write unit tests for the validation methods inside this class, however, if possible I would like to do so without utilizing the properties file. My reasoning behind this, is that if the value I'm pulling from the properties file changes, I would like that to not affect my test case. My test case is testing the code that validates the value, not the value itself.

Is there a way to use Java code inside my test class to initialize a Java class and populate the Spring @Value property inside that class then use that to test with?

I did find this How To that seems to be close, but still uses a properties file. I would rather it all be Java code.

1
  • I have described a solution here for similar problem. Hope it helps.
    – horizon7
    Jan 14 '20 at 14:58

10 Answers 10

258

If possible I would try to write those test without Spring Context. If you create this class in your test without spring, then you have full control over its fields.

To set the @value field you can use Springs ReflectionTestUtils - it has a method setField to set private fields.

@see JavaDoc: ReflectionTestUtils.setField(java.lang.Object, java.lang.String, java.lang.Object)

4
  • 2
    Or even without Spring dependencies at all by changing the field to default access (package protected) to make it simply accessible to the test. Jan 13 '16 at 10:03
  • 45
    Example : org.springframework.test.util.ReflectionTestUtils.setField(classUnderTest, "field", "value"); Mar 10 '17 at 10:37
  • 11
    You may want to make these fields set by the constructor and then move the @Value annotation to the constructor parameter. This makes the test code much simpler when writing the code manually, and Spring Boot doesn't care. Jan 2 '19 at 14:39
  • This is the best answer to just quickly change one property for a single testcase. Mar 6 '19 at 11:29
228

Since Spring 4.1 you could set up property values just in code by using org.springframework.test.context.TestPropertySource annotation on Unit Tests class level. You could use this approach even for injecting properties into dependent bean instances

For example

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(classes = FooTest.Config.class)
@TestPropertySource(properties = {
    "some.bar.value=testValue",
})
public class FooTest {

  @Value("${some.bar.value}")
  String bar;

  @Test
  public void testValueSetup() {
    assertEquals("testValue", bar);
  }


  @Configuration
  static class Config {

    @Bean
    public static PropertySourcesPlaceholderConfigurer propertiesResolver() {
        return new PropertySourcesPlaceholderConfigurer();
    }

  }

}

Note: It's necessary to have instance of org.springframework.context.support.PropertySourcesPlaceholderConfigurer in Spring context

Edit 24-08-2017: If you are using SpringBoot 1.4.0 and later you could initialize tests with @SpringBootTest and @SpringBootConfiguration annotations. More info here

In case of SpringBoot we have following code

@SpringBootTest
@SpringBootConfiguration
@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@TestPropertySource(properties = {
    "some.bar.value=testValue",
})
public class FooTest {

  @Value("${some.bar.value}")
  String bar;

  @Test
  public void testValueSetup() {
    assertEquals("testValue", bar);
  }

}
9
  • 5
    Thank you, finally someone answered how to override Value and not how to set a field. I derive values from the string field in PostConstruct and so I need the string value to be set by Spring, not after construction.
    – tequilacat
    Jul 17 '17 at 17:52
  • @Value("$aaaa") - can you use this inside class Config itself? May 10 '18 at 16:36
  • I'm not sure because Config is static class. But please feel free to check May 11 '18 at 15:48
  • How can I use @Value annotation in Mockito Test class? Oct 22 '18 at 21:43
  • I'm writing an integration test for a service which doesn't refer any code which fetch values from property file but my application has configuration class which is fetching value from property file. So when I'm running test it is giving error of unresolve placeholder , say "${spring.redis.port}"
    – legend
    Apr 16 '19 at 6:54
118

Don't abuse private fields get/set by reflection

Using reflection as that is done in several answers here is something that we could avoid.
It brings a small value here while it presents multiple drawbacks :

  • we detect reflection issues only at runtime (ex: fields not existing any longer)
  • We want encapsulation but not a opaque class that hides dependencies that should be visible and make the class more opaque and less testable.
  • it encourages bad design. Today you declare a @Value String field. Tomorrow you can declare 5 or 10 of them in that class and you may not even be straight aware that you decrease the design of the class. With a more visible approach to set these fields (such as constructor) , you will think twice before adding all these fields and you will probably encapsulate them into another class and use @ConfigurationProperties.

Make your class testable both unitary and in integration

To be able to write both plain unit tests (that is without a running spring container) and integration tests for your Spring component class, you have to make this class usable with or without Spring.
Running a container in an unit test when it is not required is a bad practice that slows down local builds : you don't want that.
I added this answer because no answer here seems to show this distinction and so they rely on a running container systematically.

So I think that you should move this property defined as an internal of the class :

@Component
public class Foo{   
    @Value("${property.value}") private String property;
    //...
}

into a constructor parameter that will be injected by Spring :

@Component
public class Foo{   
    private String property;
     
    public Foo(@Value("${property.value}") String property){
       this.property = property;
    }

    //...         
}

Unit test example

You can instantiate Foo without Spring and inject any value for property thanks to the constructor :

public class FooTest{

   Foo foo = new Foo("dummyValue");

   @Test
   public void doThat(){
      ...
   }
}

Integration test example

You can injecting the property in the context with Spring Boot in this simple way thanks to the properties attribute of @SpringBootTest :

@SpringBootTest(properties="property.value=dummyValue")
public class FooTest{
    
   @Autowired
   Foo foo;
     
   @Test
   public void doThat(){
       ...
   }    
}

You could use as alternative @TestPropertySource but it adds an additional annotation :

@SpringBootTest
@TestPropertySource(properties="property.value=dummyValue")
public class FooTest{ ...}

With Spring (without Spring Boot), it should be a little more complicated but as I didn't use Spring without Spring Boot from a long time I don't prefer say a stupid thing.

As a side note : if you have many @Value fields to set, extracting them into a class annotated with @ConfigurationProperties is more relevant because we don't want a constructor with too many arguments.

5
  • 3
    Great answer. Best practice here is also for constructor-initialized fields to be final, i.e private String final property
    – kugo2006
    Apr 21 '20 at 19:32
  • 2
    It's nice that somebody highlighted that. To make it working with Spring only, it is necessary to add the class under test in @ContextConfiguration.
    – vimterd
    Jun 3 '20 at 14:03
  • And if I have 10 fields with @Value you propose to create a constructor with 10 parameters?
    – ACV
    Aug 4 '20 at 10:22
  • 2
    @ACV never. Please read the last sentence of my answer. And the configuration properties class could have setters if many fields to set. That is less annoying for a class that is only designed to be a properties holder.
    – davidxxx
    Aug 5 '20 at 2:05
  • 1
    I think this answer provides the real solution to the problem.
    – Daniel Pop
    Apr 21 at 12:23
56

If you want, you can still run your tests within Spring Context and set the required properties inside Spring configuration class. If you use JUnit, use SpringJUnit4ClassRunner and define dedicated configuration class for your tests like that:

The class under test:

@Component
public SomeClass {

    @Autowired
    private SomeDependency someDependency;

    @Value("${someProperty}")
    private String someProperty;
}

The test class:

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class) 
@ContextConfiguration(classes = SomeClassTestsConfig.class)
public class SomeClassTests {

    @Autowired
    private SomeClass someClass;

    @Autowired
    private SomeDependency someDependency;

    @Before
    public void setup() {
       Mockito.reset(someDependency);

    @Test
    public void someTest() { ... }
}

And the configuration class for this test:

@Configuration
public class SomeClassTestsConfig {

    @Bean
    public static PropertySourcesPlaceholderConfigurer properties() throws Exception {
        final PropertySourcesPlaceholderConfigurer pspc = new PropertySourcesPlaceholderConfigurer();
        Properties properties = new Properties();

        properties.setProperty("someProperty", "testValue");

        pspc.setProperties(properties);
        return pspc;
    }
    @Bean
    public SomeClass getSomeClass() {
        return new SomeClass();
    }

    @Bean
    public SomeDependency getSomeDependency() {
        // Mockito used here for mocking dependency
        return Mockito.mock(SomeDependency.class);
    }
}

Having that said, I wouldn't recommend this approach, I just added it here for reference. In my opinion much better way is to use Mockito runner. In that case you don't run tests inside Spring at all, which is much more clear and simpler.

1
  • 4
    I agree that most logic should be tested with Mockito. I wish there was a better way of testing presence and correctness of annotations than running tests through Spring.
    – Altair7852
    Oct 1 '15 at 20:41
31

This seems to work, although still a bit verbose (I'd like something shorter still):

@BeforeClass
public static void beforeClass() {
    System.setProperty("some.property", "<value>");
}

// Optionally:
@AfterClass
public static void afterClass() {
    System.clearProperty("some.property");
}
2
  • 2
    I think this answer is cleaner as it is Spring agnostic, it works well for different scenarios, like when you have to use custom test runners and cannot just add the @TestProperty annotation.
    – raspacorp
    Feb 23 '18 at 0:11
  • 2
    This only works for the Spring integration test approach. Some answers and comments in here are leaning toward a Mockito approach, for which this certainly doesn't work (since there's nothing in Mockito that will populate the @Values, regardless of whether the corresponding property is set or not. Jan 16 '19 at 4:00
5

Adding PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer in configuration is working for me.

@Configuration
@ComponentScan
@EnableJpaRepositories
@EnableTransactionManagement
public class TestConfiguration {
    @Bean
    public DataSource dataSource() {
        EmbeddedDatabaseBuilder builder = new EmbeddedDatabaseBuilder();
        builder.setType(EmbeddedDatabaseType.DERBY);
        return builder.build();
    }

    @Bean
    public LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean entityManagerFactory() {
        LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean entityManagerFactoryBean = new LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean();
        entityManagerFactoryBean.setDataSource(dataSource());
        entityManagerFactoryBean.setPackagesToScan(new String[] { "com.test.model" });
        // Use hibernate
        JpaVendorAdapter vendorAdapter = new HibernateJpaVendorAdapter();
        entityManagerFactoryBean.setJpaVendorAdapter(vendorAdapter);
        entityManagerFactoryBean.setJpaProperties(getHibernateProperties());
        return entityManagerFactoryBean;
    }

    private Properties getHibernateProperties() {
        Properties properties = new Properties();
        properties.put("hibernate.show_sql", "false");
        properties.put("hibernate.dialect", "org.hibernate.dialect.DerbyDialect");
        properties.put("hibernate.hbm2ddl.auto", "update");
        return properties;
    }

    @Bean
    public JpaTransactionManager transactionManager() {
        JpaTransactionManager transactionManager = new JpaTransactionManager();
         transactionManager.setEntityManagerFactory(
              entityManagerFactory().getObject()
         );

         return transactionManager;
    }

    @Bean
    PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer propConfig() {
        PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer placeholderConfigurer = new PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer();
        placeholderConfigurer.setLocation(new ClassPathResource("application_test.properties"));
        return placeholderConfigurer;
    }
}

And in test class

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@SpringApplicationConfiguration(classes = TestConfiguration.class)
public class DataServiceTest {

    @Autowired
    private DataService dataService;

    @Autowired
    private DataRepository dataRepository;

    @Value("${Api.url}")
    private String baseUrl;

    @Test
    public void testUpdateData() {
        List<Data> datas = (List<Data>) dataRepository.findAll();
        assertTrue(datas.isEmpty());
        dataService.updateDatas();
        datas = (List<Data>) dataRepository.findAll();
        assertFalse(datas.isEmpty());
    }
}
3
@ExtendWith(SpringExtension.class)    // @RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(initializers = ConfigDataApplicationContextInitializer.class)

May that could help. The key is ConfigDataApplicationContextInitializer get all props datas

2

Its quite old question, and I'm not sure if it was an option at that time, but this is the reason why I always prefer DependencyInjection by the constructor than by the value.

I can imagine that your class might look like this:

class ExampleClass{

   @Autowired
   private Dog dog;

   @Value("${this.property.value}") 
   private String thisProperty;

   ...other stuff...
}

You can change it to:

class ExampleClass{

   private Dog dog;
   private String thisProperty;

   //optionally @Autowire
   public ExampleClass(final Dog dog, @Value("${this.property.value}") final String thisProperty){
      this.dog = dog;
      this.thisProperty = thisProperty;
   }

   ...other stuff...
}

With this implementation, the spring will know what to inject automatically, but for unit testing, you can do whatever you need. For example Autowire every dependency wth spring, and inject them manually via constructor to create "ExampleClass" instance, or use only spring with test property file, or do not use spring at all and create all object yourself.

0

In springboot 2.4.1 im just added annotation @SpringBootTest in my test, and obviously, setted spring.profiles.active = test in my src/test/resources/application.yml

Im using @ExtendWith({SpringExtension.class}) and @ContextConfiguration(classes = {RabbitMQ.class, GenericMapToObject.class, ModelMapper.class, StringUtils.class}) for external confs

-6

Spring Boot do a lot of automatically things to us but when we use the annotation @SpringBootTest we think that everything will be automatically solved by Spring boot.

There are a lot of documentation, but the minimal is to choose one engine (@RunWith(SpringRunner.class)) and indicate the class that will be used create the context to load the configuration (resources/applicationl.properties).

In a simple way you need the engine and the context:

@RunWith(SpringRunner.class)
@SpringBootTest(classes = MyClassTest .class)
public class MyClassTest {

    @Value("${my.property}")
    private String myProperty;

    @Test
    public void checkMyProperty(){
        Assert.assertNotNull(my.property);
    }
}

Of course, if you look the Spring Boot documentation you will find thousands os ways to do that.

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