17

Consider this method that works well:

public static bool mightBePrime(int N) {
    BigInteger a = rGen.Next (1, N-1);
    return modExp (a, N - 1, N) == 1;
}

Now, in order to fulfill a requirement of the class I'm taking, mightBePrime must accept a BigInteger N, but that means that I need a different way to generate my random BigInteger a.

My first idea was to do something like BigInteger a = (N-1) * rGen.NextDouble (), but a BigInteger can't be multiplied by a double.

How can I generate a random BigInteger between 1 and N-1, where N is a BigInteger?

10
  • 2
    There are a lot of results for random BigInteger C# on google. Do those not serve your purpose, and if not why not?
    – Patashu
    Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 5:29
  • 1
    Similar topic: stackoverflow.com/questions/2965707/… Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 5:43
  • 1
    See ericlippert.com/2013/05/06/producing-permutations-part-seven for why you might not want to use System.Random. Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 15:01
  • 3
    @svick: No, but the only part of that question that relates to security is the use of a secure random number generator. The main part of the question is how to use a random generator to get a BigInteger in a particular range. The answer to that is the same no matter what underlying RNG you use. Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 20:07
  • 2
    Vote to reopen because the other question is not concerned with a range, which is an important difference.
    – mafu
    Commented May 30, 2017 at 14:00

7 Answers 7

8

Paul suggested in a comment that I generate a number using random bytes, then throw it away if it's too big. Here's what I came up with (Marcel's answer + Paul's advice):

public static BigInteger RandomIntegerBelow(BigInteger N) {
    byte[] bytes = N.ToByteArray ();
    BigInteger R;

    do {
        random.NextBytes (bytes);
        bytes [bytes.Length - 1] &= (byte)0x7F; //force sign bit to positive
        R = new BigInteger (bytes);
    } while (R >= N);

    return R;
}

http://amirshenouda.wordpress.com/2012/06/29/implementing-rsa-c/ helped a little too.

7
  • 3
    If this becomes too slow (in the worst case you would have to generate on average 256 values before you find one in the range), an alternative is to generate a larger number and return the remainder when dividing it with N. It will not be completely uniformly random, but the larger a number you generate (before dividing and taking remainder) the closer it gets to uniformly random. Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 17:58
  • 1
    Why are you generating one more byte than necessary? Also, I think that using a do-while loop would make the code more DRY.
    – svick
    Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 19:50
  • 1
    To answer your question, see stackoverflow.com/a/5649264/711902. "You can make sure any BigInteger created from a byte[] is unsigned if you append a 00 byte to the end of the array before calling the constructor." I'm generating one extra byte, then setting the last to 0. If I don't generate that extra byte, my max possible random integer is less than N. I forgot about do-while. I'll do that instead. Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 20:06
  • 2
    @TrevorDixon Another approach would be just to reset the highest bit and not a whole byte: bytes[bytes.Length - 1] &= (byte)0x7F;. If you do that, you don't need the additional byte.
    – svick
    Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 20:31
  • 1
    I would store the highest byte of the input value Int32 highestByteIndex = bytes.Length - 1; Int32 highestByte = bytes[highestByteIndex]; and in case the number is too high, only recalculate the highest byte like this in a first try: if (bytes[highestByteIndex] > highestByte) { bytes[highestByteIndex] = (Byte)_Random.Next(highestByte + 1); } and only if the number is still too high loop and recalculate the whole number.
    – Christoph
    Commented May 14, 2017 at 17:07
7

Use the Random-Class

public BigInteger getRandom(int length){
    Random random = new Random();
    byte[] data = new byte[length];
    random.NextBytes(data);
    return new BigInteger(data);
}
4
  • 1
    How is a BigInteger an array (byte[])? This won't even compile. Perhaps you meant return new BigInteger(data)?
    – spender
    Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 5:35
  • Sorry, my fault. I forgot that line.
    – masinger
    Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 5:38
  • 2
    This doesn't ensure it's within the range I care about, but it's close. I'll generate a random number using this method, and if it's not in my range, I'll throw it away and try again. Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 14:31
  • what about just take a Mod from it. Let's say you need number from a to b and this func returned x. You just need a + x.Abs().Mod(b - a). It's possible for BigInteger implementation in c#
    – pkuderov
    Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 22:57
6

The naive implementation will fail on average 64 times before finding a valid BigInteger within the specified range.

On the worst case, my implementation will retry on average only 0.5 times (read as: 50% of the times it will find a result on the first try).

Also, unlike with modular arithmetic, my implementation maintains a uniform distribution.

Explanation

We must generate a random BigInteger between min and max.

  1. If min > max, we swap min with max
  2. To simplify the implementation we shift our range from [min, max] to [0, max-min], this way we won't have to deal with the sign bit
  3. We count how many bytes max contains (bytes.Length)
  4. From the most significant bit, we count how many bits are 0 (zeroBits)
  5. We generate a random sequence of bytes.Length bytes
  6. We know that for our sequence to be < max, at least zeroBits bits from the most significant bit must be 0, so we use a zeroBitMask to set them with a single bit-to-bit & operation over the most significant byte, this will save a lot of time by reducing the change of generating a number out of our range
  7. We check if the number we generated is > max, and if so we try again
  8. We unshift the range back from [0, max-min] to [min, max] by adding min to our result

And we have our number. 😊

Implementation

public static BigInteger RandomInRange(RandomNumberGenerator rng, BigInteger min, BigInteger max)
{
    if (min > max)
    {
        var buff = min;
        min = max;
        max = buff;
    }

    // offset to set min = 0
    BigInteger offset = -min;
    min = 0;
    max += offset;

    var value = randomInRangeFromZeroToPositive(rng, max) - offset;
    return value;
}

private static BigInteger randomInRangeFromZeroToPositive(RandomNumberGenerator rng, BigInteger max)
{
    BigInteger value;
    var bytes = max.ToByteArray();

    // count how many bits of the most significant byte are 0
    // NOTE: sign bit is always 0 because `max` must always be positive
    byte zeroBitsMask = 0b00000000;

    var mostSignificantByte = bytes[bytes.Length - 1];

    // we try to set to 0 as many bits as there are in the most significant byte, starting from the left (most significant bits first)
    // NOTE: `i` starts from 7 because the sign bit is always 0
    for (var i = 7; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        // we keep iterating until we find the most significant non-0 bit
        if ((mostSignificantByte & (0b1 << i)) != 0)
        {
            var zeroBits = 7 - i;
            zeroBitsMask = (byte)(0b11111111 >> zeroBits);
            break;
        }
    }

    do
    {
        rng.GetBytes(bytes);

        // set most significant bits to 0 (because `value > max` if any of these bits is 1)
        bytes[bytes.Length - 1] &= zeroBitsMask;

        value = new BigInteger(bytes);

        // `value > max` 50% of the times, in which case the fastest way to keep the distribution uniform is to try again
    } while (value > max);

    return value;
}

Test

using (var rng = RandomNumberGenerator.Create())
{
    BigInteger min = 0;
    BigInteger max = 5;

    var attempts = 10000000;
    var count = new int[(int)max + 1];

    var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

    for (var i = 0; i < attempts; i++)
    {
        var v = BigIntegerUtils.RandomInRange(rng, min, max);
        count[(int)v]++;
    }

    var time = sw.Elapsed;
    Console.WriteLine("Generated {0} big integers from {1} to {2} in {3}", attempts, min, max, time);
    Console.WriteLine("On average: {0} ms/integer or {1} integers/second", time.TotalMilliseconds / attempts, attempts / time.TotalSeconds);

    for (var i = 0; i <= max; i++)
        Console.WriteLine("{0} generated {1}% of the times ({2} times)", i, count[i] * 100d / attempts, count[i]);
}

Test output on my i7-6500U:

Generated 10000000 big integers from 0 to 5 in 00:00:09.5413677
On average: 0.00095413677 ms/integer or 1048067.77334449 integers/second
0 generated 16.66633% of the times (1666633 times)
1 generated 16.6717% of the times (1667170 times)
2 generated 16.66373% of the times (1666373 times)
3 generated 16.6666% of the times (1666660 times)
4 generated 16.68271% of the times (1668271 times)
5 generated 16.64893% of the times (1664893 times)

Another test output on my i7-6500U

Generated 10000000 big integers from 0 to 10^100 in 00:00:17.5036570
On average: 0.0017503657 ms/integer or 571309.184132207 integers/second
2
  • Cool! Can you add a paragraph explaining how it works, especially in contrast with the current accepted answer? Commented Feb 19, 2018 at 10:22
  • Oops! I tried to explain the code with comments, but an overview is probably necessary. I'll be adding it ASAP. Commented Feb 19, 2018 at 12:27
1

Here is a NextBigInteger extension method for the Random class. It is based on the excellent Fabio Iotti's implementation, modified for succinctness.

/// <summary>
/// Returns a random BigInteger that is within a specified range.
/// The lower bound is inclusive, and the upper bound is exclusive.
/// </summary>
public static BigInteger NextBigInteger(this Random random,
    BigInteger minValue, BigInteger maxValue)
{
    if (minValue > maxValue) throw new ArgumentException();
    if (minValue == maxValue) return minValue;
    BigInteger zeroBasedUpperBound = maxValue - 1 - minValue; // Inclusive
    Debug.Assert(zeroBasedUpperBound.Sign >= 0);
    byte[] bytes = zeroBasedUpperBound.ToByteArray();
    Debug.Assert(bytes.Length > 0);
    Debug.Assert((bytes[bytes.Length - 1] & 0b10000000) == 0);

    // Search for the most significant non-zero bit
    byte lastByteMask = 0b11111111;
    for (byte mask = 0b10000000; mask > 0; mask >>= 1, lastByteMask >>= 1)
    {
        if ((bytes[bytes.Length - 1] & mask) == mask) break; // We found it
    }

    while (true)
    {
        random.NextBytes(bytes);
        bytes[bytes.Length - 1] &= lastByteMask;
        var result = new BigInteger(bytes);
        Debug.Assert(result.Sign >= 0);
        if (result <= zeroBasedUpperBound) return result + minValue;
    }
}

The percentage of BigInteger instances that are discarded, in order to return a value within the desirable range, is 30% on average (best case 0%, worst case 50%).

The distribution of random numbers is uniform.

Usage example:

Random random = new();
BigInteger value = random.NextBigInteger(BigInteger.Zero, new BigInteger(1000));

Note: The structure of the bytes returned from the BigInteger.ToByteArray is well documented (in the Remarks section), so it should be fairly safe to assume that the BigInteger's byte[] representation is not going to change in future versions of the .NET platform. In case that happened, the above NextBigInteger implementation could fail in nasty ways, like entering an infinite loop or generating numbers within a wrong range. I've added some debugging assertions that should never fail with the current representation, but the coverage of checking for invalid conditions is by no means thorough.

0

Here's an alternate way to generate numbers within range without throwing away values and allowing BigIntegers for min and max.

public BigInteger RandomBigInteger(BigInteger min, BigInteger max)
    {
        Random rnd = new Random();
        string numeratorString, denominatorString;
        double fraction = rnd.NextDouble();
        BigInteger inRange;

        //Maintain all 17 digits of precision, 
        //but remove the leading zero and the decimal point;
        numeratorString = fraction.ToString("G17").Remove(0, 2);  

        //Use the length instead of 17 in case the random
        //fraction ends with one or more zeros
        denominatorString = string.Format("1E{0}", numeratorString.Length); 

        inRange = (max - min) * BigInteger.Parse(numeratorString) /
           BigInteger.Parse(denominatorString, 
           System.Globalization.NumberStyles.AllowExponent) 
           + min;
        return inRange;
    }

For generality you may want to specify precision as well. This seems to work.

    public BigInteger RandomBigIntegerInRange(BigInteger min, BigInteger max, int precision)
    {
        Random rnd = new Random();
        string numeratorString, denominatorString;
        double fraction = rnd.NextDouble();
        BigInteger inRange;

        numeratorString = GenerateNumeratorWithSpecifiedPrecision(precision);
        denominatorString = string.Format("1E{0}", numeratorString.Length); 

        inRange = (max - min) * BigInteger.Parse(numeratorString) / BigInteger.Parse(denominatorString, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.AllowExponent) + min;
        return inRange;
    }

    private string GenerateNumeratorWithSpecifiedPrecision(int precision)
    {
        Random rnd = new Random();
        string answer = string.Empty;

        while(answer.Length < precision)
        {
            answer += rnd.NextDouble().ToString("G17").Remove(0, 2);                
        }
        if (answer.Length > precision) //Most likely
        {
            answer = answer.Substring(0, precision);
        }
        return answer;
    } 
0

For my use case, I did the following:

Random rnd = new Random();
BigInteger myVal = rnd.NextBigInteger(50,100); //returns a 50-99 bit BigInteger

The code:

/// <summary>
/// Returns a random BigInteger with a minimum bit count between <paramref name="minBitLength"/>(inclusive) and <paramref name="maxBitLength"/>(exclusive).
/// </summary>
/// <param name="minBitLength">The inclusive lower bit length of the random BigInteger returned.</param>
/// <param name="maxBitLength">The exclusive upper bit length of the random BigInteger returned. <paramref name="maxBitLength"/> must be greater than or equal to minValue.</param>
public static BigInteger NextBigInteger(this Random rnd, int minBitLength, int maxBitLength)
{
    if (minBitLength < 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    int bits = rnd.Next(minBitLength, maxBitLength);
    if (bits == 0) return BigInteger.Zero;
    byte[] bytes = new byte[(bits + 7) / 8];
    rnd.NextBytes(bytes);
    // For the top byte, place a leading 1-bit then downshift to achieve desired length.
    bytes[^1] = (byte)((0x80 | bytes[^1]) >> (7 - (bits - 1) % 8));
    return new BigInteger(bytes, true);
}

Example Results:

                        ____Example Lengths___ ___Example Results___
NextBigInteger(0,0) ==> 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 |  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
NextBigInteger(0,1) ==> 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 |  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
NextBigInteger(0,2) ==> 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 |  1  1  1  1  0  1  0
NextBigInteger(0,3) ==> 2 2 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 |  0  1  0  2  0  1  2
NextBigInteger(0,4) ==> 3 2 0 3 0 0 0 3 1 3 3 |  0  1  1  0  3  1  0
NextBigInteger(0,5) ==> 1 4 1 2 4 1 2 0 3 1 2 |  1  1 10 10 14 11  8
NextBigInteger(0,6) ==> 3 5 1 1 5 5 3 5 1 4 3 |  0  0  1  3  2  7 27
NextBigInteger(1,1) ==> 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 |  1  1  1  1  1  1  1
NextBigInteger(1,2) ==> 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 |  1  1  1  1  1  1  1
NextBigInteger(1,3) ==> 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 |  1  1  1  1  2  2  3
NextBigInteger(1,4) ==> 1 2 3 3 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 |  7  3  1  1  6  1  5
NextBigInteger(1,5) ==> 4 3 1 2 3 1 4 4 1 1 3 |  1  3  1  6  6 12  7
NextBigInteger(1,6) ==> 5 5 4 1 1 2 3 2 1 1 1 |  1 28  7  5 25 15 13
NextBigInteger(2,2) ==> 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 |  2  2  3  2  3  2  3
NextBigInteger(2,3) ==> 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 |  2  2  3  2  2  3  3
NextBigInteger(2,4) ==> 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 |  3  2  7  6  3  3  3
NextBigInteger(2,5) ==> 2 4 2 2 4 4 2 2 4 3 2 |  6  3 13  2  6  4 11
NextBigInteger(2,6) ==> 5 3 5 3 2 3 2 4 4 5 3 |  2  3 17  2 27 14 18
NextBigInteger(3,3) ==> 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 |  4  4  5  7  6  7  4
NextBigInteger(3,4) ==> 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 |  6  5  4  7  6  4  6
NextBigInteger(3,5) ==> 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 |  6 10 12  6  6 15  7
NextBigInteger(3,6) ==> 4 4 3 3 3 4 3 5 4 3 4 | 28 22  5 11 25  8  6
NextBigInteger(4,4) ==> 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 | 12  8  8  9  8 10 13
NextBigInteger(4,5) ==> 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 | 15 10 10  8 14  8 13
NextBigInteger(4,6) ==> 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 | 15 13 14 31 19 15 21

Some Random Stuff:

  • One issue with many large random number generators is they can produce output that are all similar in scale to the maxValue. Example: if we had something like RandomBigIntegerUsingValues(min: 100, max:999999999999999) then 99% of our results will be between 9999999999999 and 999999999999999. The odds of getting something under 1000000 are 1 in 1000000000.
  • Some range checking is implicitly handled by the Random.Next().
  • Matched .net libraries extension methods as best as possible so the name NextBigInteger() was used since it matches Random's built-in NextSingle(), NextDouble(), NextInt64() naming. And also .net's Random signature was was used: minBitLength(inclusive), maxBitLength(exclusive).
  • Releasing under the MIT License.
1
  • This answer is about how to generate a random BigInteger within a certain bit-length range, not within a certain numeric range, which is what is asked in the question. Commented May 4, 2022 at 7:59
-2

The following Range method will return an IEnumerable<BigInteger> within the range you specify. A simple Extension method will return a random element within the IEnumerable.

public static IEnumerable<BigInteger> Range(BigInteger from, BigInteger to)
{
    for(BigInteger i = from; i < to; i++) yield return i;
}

public static class Extensions
{
    public static BigInteger RandomElement(this IEnumerable<BigInteger> enumerable, Random rand)
    {
        int index = rand.Next(0, enumerable.Count());
        return enumerable.ElementAt(index);
    }
}

usage:

Random rnd = new Random();
var big = Range(new BigInteger(10000000000000000), new BigInteger(10000000000000020)).RandomElement(rnd);

// returns random values and in this case it was 10000000000000003

1
  • Two problems: 1) Range only allows integer parameters. 2) Even if Range allowed BigInteger, this returns a sequence of all values in the range, in order. He wants a random number in the range from <= value < to. Commented Jun 28, 2013 at 21:59

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