28

It took me a while to figure out how to do this, so posting in case anyone else is looking for the same.

27

For adding a newline after a pattern, you can also say:

sed '/pattern/{G;}' filename

Quoting GNU sed manual:

G
    Append a newline to the contents of the pattern space, and then append the contents of the hold space to that of the pattern space.

EDIT:

Incidentally, this happens to be covered in sed one liners:

 # insert a blank line below every line which matches "regex"
 sed '/regex/G'
8

This sed command:

sed -i '' '/pid = run/ a\
\
' file.txt

Finds the line with: pid = run

file.txt before

; Note: the default prefix is /usr/local/var
; Default Value: none
;pid = run/php-fpm.pid

; Error log file

and adds a linebreak after that line inside file.txt

file.txt after

; Note: the default prefix is /usr/local/var
; Default Value: none
;pid = run/php-fpm.pid


; Error log file

Or if you want to add text and a linebreak:

sed -i '/pid = run/ a\
new line of text\
' file.txt

file.txt after

; Note: the default prefix is /usr/local/var
; Default Value: none
;pid = run/php-fpm.pid
new line of text

; Error log file
  • 1
    sed 'a' is a pretty good idea ... I would've used sed -e '/pid = run/ s/$/\n/' or sed -e '/pid = run/ s/$/\nnew line of text/' – Uroc327 Jun 28 '13 at 11:03
2

A simple substitution works well:

sed 's/pattern.*$/&\n/'

Example :

$ printf "Hi\nBye\n" | sed 's/H.*$/&\nJohn/'
Hi
John
Bye

To be standard compliant, replace \n by backslash newline :

$ printf "Hi\nBye\n" | sed 's/H.*$/&\
> John/'
Hi
John
Bye
  • 3
    To answer the question as asked, you'd have to do sed 's/pattern.*/&\n/', otherwise you'll insert the newline right after the match instead of at the end of the line. Also note that your solution requires GNU sed (won't work on BSD/OSX, because the BSD sed implementation doesn't support escape sequence \n in the replacement string). – mklement0 Jun 6 '16 at 2:29
  • 1
    Oh thanks I didn't know about the difference between GNU sed and BSD/OSX sed. Worth knowing ! – Richard Jun 6 '16 at 4:23
  • 1
    ++; there are many differences, unfortunately; BSD Sed implements only a few extensions to the POSIX spec., while GNU Sed implements many more - I've tried to compile the differences in this answer. – mklement0 Jun 6 '16 at 4:32
2
sed '/pattern/a\\r' file name 

It will add a return after the pattern while g will replace the pattern with a blank line.

If a new line (blank) has to be added at end of the file use this:

sed '$a\\r' file name
  • 2
    CARRIAGE RETURN vs LINE FEED: some people will need to use a \n instead of a \r. – sjas Dec 4 '17 at 17:35
0

Another possibility, e.g. if You don't have an empty hold register, could be:

sed '/pattern/{p;s/.*//}' file

Explanation:
/pattern/{...} = apply sequence of commands, if line with pattern found,
p = print the current line,
; = separator between commands,
s/.*// = replace anything with nothing in the pattern register,
then automatically print the empty pattern register as additional line)

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