18

My interest is in the difference between for and while loops. I know that the post-increment value is used and then incremented and the operation returns a constant pre-increment.

while (true) {
    //...
    i++;
    int j = i;
}

Here, will j contain the old i or the post-incremented i at the end of the loop?

45

Since the statement i++ ends at the ; in your example, it makes no difference whether you use pre- or post-increment.

The difference arises when you utilize the result:

int j = i++; // i will contain i_old + 1, j will contain the i_old.

Vs:

int j = ++i; // i and j will both contain i_old + 1.
  • 1
    int j = ++i; // i will be incremented, and j will contain i+1. This is false. j will still contain i, but it is already incremented so there is no need to make it contain i + 1. – Tim Nov 21 '15 at 11:07
  • 1
    @Tim "j will contain i+1" refers to the original value of i - admittedly not an ideal formulation. j and i will both have the same value when the statement completes. – zennehoy Nov 21 '15 at 23:00
  • An important exception is when ++i is mixed w/ other i use in complex statments. printXY(++i, i++) and a[i] = ++i produce pathological results when tested across multiple compilers. The solution is to avoid multiple usage of variables preincremented, or dependent on preincremented values. For instance a[i] = i; can be rewritten as i++; a[i] = i; for consistency and clarity. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/2989704/… For more info. – Jason R. Mick Nov 5 '17 at 21:14
  • @JasonR.Mick Absolutely, though I think you have a typo in that second-to-last code snippet (should probably be a[i] = ++i). Note though that the actual answer to the question as asked is the first sentence. The rest was just to add a bit more context, and could obviously be expanded. – zennehoy Nov 6 '17 at 8:30
  • @zennehoy Good catch, indeed should have read: ... a[i] = ++i; can be rewritten as i++; a[i] = i; .... (second copy of a[i] = ++i; in the above comment is missing the pre-increment operator). – Jason R. Mick Nov 14 '17 at 14:34
39

Depends on how you use them.

  • i++ makes a copy, increases i, and returns the copy (old value).
  • ++i increases i, and returns i.

In your example it is all about speed. ++i will be the faster than i++ since it doesn't make a copy.

However a compiler will probably optimize it away since you are not storing the returned value from the increment operator in your example, but this is only possible for fundamental types like a int.

  • Assuming i isn't of class type, it makes no difference in speed. Even for a class type, pre-increment isn't necessarily faster than post-increment, depending on the implementation. – zennehoy Jun 28 '13 at 14:29
  • @zennehoy I hope you mean it the other way around. And even for class types it might be faster to use pre-increment. Like iterators. – Tim Jun 28 '13 at 14:31
  • 1
    Generally, pre-increment will be the same or faster than post-increment (since it shouldn't need to make a copy). Depending on the implementation, it could also be the other way around (though this would probably be a pretty poor implementation). – zennehoy Jun 28 '13 at 14:35
  • Even iterators generally have identical performance between pre- and post-increment, since they are usually just wrapped pointers. Still, you are right that using pre-increment when possible might gain you some performance, and almost certainly won't be worse. – zennehoy Jun 28 '13 at 14:39
  • @zennehoy I don't think I understand what you're first comment is supposed to mean, while you're confirming my answer in your second. – Tim Jun 28 '13 at 14:40
22

Basic answer for understanding. The incrementation operator works like this:

// ++i
function pre_increment(i) {
    i += 1;
    return i;
}
// i++
function post_increment(i) {
    copy = i;
    i += 1;
    return copy;
}

A good compiler will automatically replace i++ with ++i when it detect that the returned value will not be used.

6

In pre-increment the initial value is first incremented and then used inside the expression.

a = ++i;

In this example suppose the value of variable i is 5. Then value of variable a will be 6 because the value of i gets modified before using it in a expression.

In post-increment value is first used in a expression and then incremented.

a = i++;

In this example suppose the value of variable i is 5. Then value of variable a will be 5 because value of i gets incremented only after assigning the value 5 to a .

4
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argp)
{
    int x = 5;

    printf("x=%d\n", ++x);
    printf("x=%d\n", x++);
    printf("x=%d\n", x);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Program Output:

x=6
x=6
x=7

In the first printf statement x is incremented before being passed to printf so the value 6 is output, in the second x is passed to printf (so 6 is output) and then incremented and the 3rd printf statement just shows that post increment following the previous statement by outputting x again which now has the value 7.

2

i++ uses i's value then increments it but ++i increments i's value before using it.

0

The difference between post- and pre-increment is really, in many cases subtle. post incremenet, aka num++, first creates a copy of num, returns it, and after that, increments it. Pre-increment, on the other hand, aka ++num, first evaluates, then returns the value. Most modern compilers, when seeing this in a loop, will generally optimize, mostly when post increment is used, and the returned initial value is not used. The most major difference between the 2 increments, where it is really common to make subtle bugs, is when declaring variables, with incremented values: Example below:

int num = 5;
int num2 = ++num; //Here, first num is incremented, 
                  //then made 6, and that value is stored in num2;

Another example:

int num = 5;
int num2 = num++; //Here, num is first returned, (unfortunately?), and then 
                  //incremented. This is useful for some cases.

The last thing here I want to say is BE CAREFUL WITH INCREMENTS. When declaring variables, make sure you use the right increment, or just write the whole thing out (num2 = num + 1, which doesn't always work, and is the equivalent of pre-increment). A lot of trouble will be saved, if you use the right increment.

0

it does not matter if you use pre or post increment in an independent statement, except for the pre-increment the effect is immediate

//an example will make it more clear:


int n=1;
printf("%d",n);
printf("%d",++n);// try changing it to n++(you'll get to know what's going on)

n++;
printf("%d",n);

output: 123

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