368

How do you get the length of a string stored in a variable and assign that to another variable?

myvar="some string"
echo ${#myvar}  
# 11

How do you set another variable to the output 11?

10 Answers 10

227

UTF-8 string length

In addition to fedorqui's correct answer, I would like to show the difference between string length and byte length:

myvar='Généralités'
chrlen=${#myvar}
oLang=$LANG oLcAll=$LC_ALL
LANG=C LC_ALL=C
bytlen=${#myvar}
LANG=$oLang LC_ALL=$oLcAll
printf "%s is %d char len, but %d bytes len.\n" "${myvar}" $chrlen $bytlen

will render:

Généralités is 11 char len, but 14 bytes len.

you could even have a look at stored chars:

myvar='Généralités'
chrlen=${#myvar}
oLang=$LANG oLcAll=$LC_ALL
LANG=C LC_ALL=C
bytlen=${#myvar}
printf -v myreal "%q" "$myvar"
LANG=$oLang LC_ALL=$oLcAll
printf "%s has %d chars, %d bytes: (%s).\n" "${myvar}" $chrlen $bytlen "$myreal"

will answer:

Généralités has 11 chars, 14 bytes: ($'G\303\251n\303\251ralit\303\251s').

Nota: According to Isabell Cowan's comment, I've added setting to $LC_ALL along with $LANG.

Length of an argument

Argument work same as regular variables

strLen() {
    local bytlen sreal oLang=$LANG oLcAll=$LC_ALL
    LANG=C LC_ALL=C
    bytlen=${#1}
    printf -v sreal %q "$1"
    LANG=$oLang LC_ALL=$oLcAll
    printf "String '%s' is %d bytes, but %d chars len: %s.\n" "$1" $bytlen ${#1} "$sreal"
}

will work as

strLen théorème
String 'théorème' is 10 bytes, but 8 chars len: $'th\303\251or\303\250me'

Useful printf correction tool:

If you:

for string in Généralités Language Théorème Février  "Left: ←" "Yin Yang ☯";do
    printf " - %-14s is %2d char length\n" "'$string'"  ${#string}
done

 - 'Généralités' is 11 char length
 - 'Language'     is  8 char length
 - 'Théorème'   is  8 char length
 - 'Février'     is  7 char length
 - 'Left: ←'    is  7 char length
 - 'Yin Yang ☯' is 10 char length

Not really pretty... For this, there is a little function:

strU8DiffLen () { 
    local bytlen oLang=$LANG oLcAll=$LC_ALL
    LANG=C LC_ALL=C
    bytlen=${#1}
    LANG=$oLang LC_ALL=$oLcAll
    return $(( bytlen - ${#1} ))
}

Then now:

for string in Généralités Language Théorème Février  "Left: ←" "Yin Yang ☯";do
    strU8DiffLen "$string"
    printf " - %-$((14+$?))s is %2d chars length, but uses %2d bytes\n" \
        "'$string'" ${#string} $((${#string}+$?))
  done 

 - 'Généralités'  is 11 chars length, but uses 14 bytes
 - 'Language'     is  8 chars length, but uses  8 bytes
 - 'Théorème'     is  8 chars length, but uses 10 bytes
 - 'Février'      is  7 chars length, but uses  8 bytes
 - 'Left: ←'      is  7 chars length, but uses  9 bytes
 - 'Yin Yang ☯'   is 10 chars length, but uses 12 bytes

But there left some strange UTF-8 behaviour, like double-spaced chars, zero spaced chars, reverse deplacement and other that could not be as simple... Have a look at diffU8test.sh or diffU8test.sh.txt for more limitations.

  • I appreciate this answer, as file systems impose name limitations in bytes and not characters. – Gid Nov 14 '16 at 18:33
  • 1
    You may also need to set LC_ALL=C and perhaps others. – Isabell Cowan Dec 29 '16 at 1:49
  • 1
    @F.Hauri But, it none the less follows that on some systems your solution will not work, because it leaves LC_ALL alone. It might work fine on default installs of Debian and it's derivatives, but on others (like Arch Linux) it will fail to give the correct byte length of the string. – Isabell Cowan Jan 3 '17 at 18:49
  • 1
    thanks for taking something simple and convoluting it :) – thistleknot Nov 6 '18 at 16:45
  • 2
    @thistleknot I'm sorry, 對不起 Sometime simple is just an idea. – F. Hauri Nov 6 '18 at 20:43
431

To get the length of a string stored in a variable, say:

myvar="some string"
size=${#myvar} 

To confirm it was properly saved, echo it:

$ echo "$size"
11
  • 8
    With UTF-8 stings, you could have a string length and a bytes length. see my answer – F. Hauri Jun 23 '15 at 17:59
  • You can also use it directly in other parameter expansions - for example in this test I check that $rulename starts with the $RULE_PREFIX prefix: [ "${rulename:0:${#RULE_PREFIX}}" == "$RULE_PREFIX" ] – Thomas Guyot-Sionnest Jul 21 '15 at 14:13
  • Could you please explain a bit the expressions of #myvar and {#myvar}? – Lerner Zhang Sep 19 '16 at 6:03
  • 1
    @lerneradams see Bash reference manual →3.5.3 Shell Parameter Expansion on ${#parameter}: The length in characters of the expanded value of parameter is substituted. – fedorqui Oct 21 '16 at 14:31
19

You can use:

MYSTRING="abc123"
MYLENGTH=$(printf "%s" "$MYSTRING" | wc -c)
  • wc -c or wc --bytes for byte counts = Unicode characters are counted with 2, 3 or more bytes.
  • wc -m or wc --chars for character counts = Unicode characters are counted single until they use more bytes.
15

If you want to use this with command line or function arguments, make sure you use size=${#1} instead of size=${#$1}. The second one may be more instinctual but is incorrect syntax.

  • 14
    Part of the problem with "you can't do <invalid syntax>" is that, that syntax being invalid, it's unclear what a reader should interpret it to mean. size=${#1} is certainly valid. – Charles Duffy Jun 5 '14 at 20:18
  • Well, that's unexpected. I didn't know that #1 was a substitute for $1 in this case. – Dick Guertin Jun 7 '14 at 0:08
  • 16
    It isn't. # isn't replacing the $ -- the $ outside the braces is still the expansion operator. The # is the length operator, as always. – Charles Duffy Jun 7 '14 at 1:25
  • I've fixed this answer since it is a useful tip but not an exception to the rule - it follows the rule exactly, as pointed out by @CharlesDuffy – Zane Hooper Aug 19 '16 at 20:51
12

I wanted the simplest case, finally this is a result:

echo -n 'Tell me the length of this sentence.' | wc -m;
36
  • 4
    sorry mate :( This is bash... the cursed hammer that sees everything as a nail, particularly your thumb. 'Tell me the length of this sentence.' contains 36 characters. echo '' | wc -m => 1. You'd need to use -n: echo -n '' | wc -m => 0... in which case it's a good solution :) – AJP Oct 11 '17 at 15:06
  • 1
    Thanks for the correction! Manual page says: -n do not output the trailing newline – dmatej Oct 11 '17 at 19:11
12

In response to the post starting:

If you want to use this with command line or function arguments...

with the code:

size=${#1}

There might be the case where you just want to check for a zero length argument and have no need to store a variable. I believe you can use this sort of syntax:

if [ -z "$1" ]; then
    #zero length argument 
else
    #non-zero length
fi

See GNU and wooledge for a more complete list of Bash conditional expressions.

9

Using your example provided

#KISS (Keep it simple stupid)
size=${#myvar}
echo $size
8

Here is couple of ways to calculate length of variable :

echo ${#VAR}
echo -n $VAR | wc -m
echo -n $VAR | wc -c
printf $VAR | wc -m
expr length $VAR
expr $VAR : '.*'

and to set the result in another variable just assign above command with back quote into another variable as following:

otherVar=`echo -n $VAR | wc -m`   
echo $otherVar

http://techopsbook.blogspot.in/2017/09/how-to-find-length-of-string-variable.html

7

I was trying to do something similar, but I just wanted to make sure the user input wasn't too long.

if [ ${#string} -ge 12 ]; then 
    echo ">= 12 characters. too long"
    exit
else 
    echo "under 12 characters, not too long."
fi
  • 3
    That's not an answer to the question. FIY, the question is How do you get the length of a string stored in a variable and assign that to another variable? if you have another question, feel free to ask a new question. – gniourf_gniourf Dec 26 '17 at 23:02
-1

I would use something like this:

var2=$(echo $myvar | wc -c)

You don't need a script.

  • 7
    That's atesin's answer; you're not adding anything relevant here (only copying what was already said). Besides, your answer is broken: you're missing quotes. And using echo is broken too—and it's wrong: you'll get 1 extra count (because of the trailing newline). – gniourf_gniourf May 18 '16 at 6:11
  • Thank you @Galaxy because wc -c is what I needed to count the length of STDOUT. – Jose Nobile Nov 12 '16 at 12:57

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