253

attr_accessible seems to no longer work within my model.

What is the way to allow mass assignment in Rails 4?

441

Rails 4 now uses strong parameters.

Protecting attributes is now done in the controller. This is an example:

class PeopleController < ApplicationController
  def create
    Person.create(person_params)
  end

  private

  def person_params
    params.require(:person).permit(:name, :age)
  end
end

No need to set attr_accessible in the model anymore.

Dealing with accepts_nested_attributes_for

In order to use accepts_nested_attribute_for with strong parameters, you will need to specify which nested attributes should be whitelisted.

class Person
  has_many :pets
  accepts_nested_attributes_for :pets
end

class PeopleController < ApplicationController
  def create
    Person.create(person_params)
  end

  # ...

  private

  def person_params
    params.require(:person).permit(:name, :age, pets_attributes: [:name, :category])
  end
end

Keywords are self-explanatory, but just in case, you can find more information about strong parameters in the Rails Action Controller guide.

Note: If you still want to use attr_accessible, you need to add protected_attributes to your Gemfile. Otherwise, you will be faced with a RuntimeError.

  • 1
    The document didn't say that attr_accessible need to be removed. What will happen if we keep it? – lulalala Sep 11 '13 at 2:29
  • 12
    You'll get an error if you don't make some adjustments to your Gemfile. RuntimeError in MicropostsController#index 'attr_accessible' is extracted out of Rails into a gem. Please use new recommended protection model for params(strong_parameters) or add 'protected_attributes' to your Gemfile to use old one. – user Sep 24 '13 at 20:16
  • 5
    Great explanation. It seems like in practice, though, this moves Rails away from fat model, thin controller, etc, and towards thin models, and really bloated controllers. You have to write all this stuff for every instance, it doesn't read nicely, and nesting seems to be a pain. The old attr_accessible/attr_accessor in the model system wasn't broken, and didn't need to be fixed. One blog post got too popular in this case. – rcd Jul 1 '14 at 4:31
  • 1
    You don't have to handle permitted parameters in your controllers. In fact it's a violation of the single responsibility principle. Take a look at the following blog post edelpero.svbtle.com/strong-parameters-the-right-way – Pierre-Louis Gottfrois Dec 19 '14 at 19:00
  • 3
    So gimmiky & frequently changing apis, coupled with newfound pedantics waste many developer hours in yet another painful Rails upgrade :-( – Brian Takita Jan 23 '15 at 19:26
22

If you prefer attr_accessible, you could use it in Rails 4 too. You should install it like gem:

gem 'protected_attributes'

after that you could use attr_accessible in you models like in Rails 3

Also, and i think that is the best way- using form objects for dealing with mass assignment, and saving nested objects, and you can also use protected_attributes gem that way

class NestedForm
   include  ActiveModel::MassAssignmentSecurity
   attr_accessible :name,
                   :telephone, as: :create_params
   def create_objects(params)
      SomeModel.new(sanitized_params(params, :create_params))
   end
end
  • 1
    When you use 'strong parameters' you filter parameters in controller layer, and i don't think that this is best idea for all applications. For me the best way to filter parameters is to use additional layer. And we can use 'protected_attributes' gem to write this layer – edikgat Oct 16 '14 at 11:26
4

We can use

params.require(:person).permit(:name, :age)

where person is Model, you can pass this code on a method person_params & use in place of params[:person] in create method or else method

1

1) Update Devise so that it can handle Rails 4.0 by adding this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'devise', '3.0.0.rc' 

Then execute:

$ bundle

2) Add the old functionality of attr_accessible again to rails 4.0

Try to use attr_accessible and don't comment this out.

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'protected_attributes'

Then execute:

$ bundle
0

An update for Rails 5:

gem 'protected_attributes' 

doesn't seem to work anymore. But give:

gem 'protected_attributes_continued'

a try.

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