45

I'm implementing some algorithms to teach myself about graphs and how to work with them. What would you recommend is the best way to do that in Java? I was thinking something like this:

public class Vertex {

    private ArrayList<Vertex> outnodes; //Adjacency list. if I wanted to support edge weight, this would be a hash map.

    //methods to manipulate outnodes
}

public class Graph {
    private ArrayList<Vertex> nodes;
    //algorithms on graphs
}

But I basically just made this up. Is there a better way?

Also, I want it to be able to support variations on vanilla graphs like digraphs, weighted edges, multigraphs, etc.

1
  • What did you go with to start? I am preparing myself for a test, I have one day left. I will have to write a program for small number of nodes. I also thought of the same way as you did.
    – Bugs Buggy
    Jan 15, 2018 at 21:39

12 Answers 12

33

Each node is named uniquely and knows who it is connected to. The List of connections allows for a Node to be connected to an arbitrary number of other nodes.

public class Node {
    public String name;
    public List<Edge> connections;
}

Each connection is directed, has a start and an end, and is weighted.

public class Edge {
    public Node start;
    public Node end;
    public double weight;
}

A graph is just your collection of nodes. Instead of List<Node> consider Map<String, Node> for fast lookup by name.

public class Graph {
    List<Node> nodes;
}
3
  • Maybe it is better to name connections as neighbours. Also if we will not use Edges separately, we already know its start point, so one may remove it for most use cases to make it more space efficient
    – mcvkr
    Aug 19, 2016 at 23:14
  • I can imagine a graph not including edges. If you don;t need weights on the edges or of you don't need direction that could be a fine simplification.
    – bhspencer
    Aug 20, 2016 at 14:05
  • 1
    I mean we should include edges as a list, it is a good strategy for most problems but we may not need the "Node start" object in the edge object, because when traversing nodes of the graph we know that the node traversed is the start. By the way connections can be changed to "edges", my suggestion neighbours is a worse name :(
    – mcvkr
    Aug 20, 2016 at 15:03
18

If you need weighted edges and multigraphs, you might want to add another class Edge.

I would also recommend using generics to allow specifying which sub-class of Vertex and Edge are currently used. For example:

public class Graph<V extends Vertex> {
List<V> vertices;
...
}

When it comes to implementing graph algorithms, you could also define interfaces for your graph classes on which the algorithms can operate, so that you can play around with different implementations of the actual graph representation. For example, simple graphs that are well-connected might be better implemented by an adjacency matrix, sparser graphs might be represented by adjacency lists - it all depends...

BTW Building such structures efficiently can be quite challenging, so maybe you could give us some more details on what kind of job you would want to use them for? For more complex tasks I would suggest you have a look at the various Java graph libraries, to get some inspiration.

3
  • I don't really have any details... my self-teaching goals are pretty open ended. I just want to set up some graphs, find some minimum spanning trees, do some output to graphviz, calculate topological sort, etc. Nov 15, 2009 at 14:25
  • and can you clarify how you'd use generics? Nov 15, 2009 at 14:25
  • Ah, thanks for the clarification. If it's just for playing around I think adjacency lists will pretty much do the job... it does not seem to performance-intensive. Hope I clarified the generics part. Nov 15, 2009 at 14:32
6

Take a look at the http://jung.sourceforge.net/doc/index.html graph library. You can still practice implementing your own algorithms (maybe breadth-first or depth-first search to start), but you don't need to worry about creating the graph structure.

1
  • 1
    bfs and dfs in graphs?
    – Karan
    May 30, 2015 at 8:10
5

Why not keep things simple and use an adjacency matrix or an adjacency list?

2

Time ago I had the same problem and did my own implementation. What I suggest you is to implement another class: Edge. Then, a Vertex will have a List of Edge.

public class Edge {
    private Node a, b;
    private directionEnum direction;     // AB, BA or both
    private int weight;
    ...
}

It worked for me. But maybe is so simple. There is this library that maybe can help you if you look into its code: http://jgrapht.sourceforge.net/

2

I'd recommend graphviz highly when you get to the point where you want to render your graphs.

And its companions: take a look at Laszlo Szathmary's GraphViz class, along with notugly.xls.

5
1

Even at the time of this question, over 3 years ago, Sage (which is completely free) existed and was pretty good at graph theory. But, in 2012 it is about the best graph theory tool there is. Thus, Sage already has a huge amount of graph theory material built in, including other free and open source stuff that is out there. So, simply messing around with various things to learn more is easy as no programming is required.

And, if you are interested in the programming part as well, first Sage is open source so you can see any code that already exists. And, second, you can re-program any function you want if you really want to practice, or you can be the first to program something that does not already exist. In the latter case, you can even submit that new functionality and make Sage better for all other users.

At this time, this answer may not be that useful to the OP (since it has been 3 years), but hopefully it is useful to any one else who sees this question in the future.

1
  • 3
    Seems to be Python. The question clearly asks about Java.
    – kaqqao
    Nov 21, 2018 at 22:28
1

Adjacency List implementation of Graph is appropriate for solving most of the graph related problems.

Java implementation of the same is here on my blog.

1
class Graph<E> {
    private List<Vertex<E>> vertices;

    private static class Vertex<E> {
        E elem;
        List<Vertex<E>> neighbors;
    }
}
0

A simple representation written by 'Robert Sedgwick' and 'Kevin Wayne' is available at http://algs4.cs.princeton.edu/41graph/Graph.java.html

Explanation copied from the above page.

The Graph class represents an undirected graph of vertices named 0 through V - 1.

It supports the following two primary operations: add an edge to the graph, iterate over all of the vertices adjacent to a vertex. It also provides methods for returning the number of vertices V and the number of edges E. Parallel edges and self-loops are permitted. By convention, a self-loop v-v appears in the adjacency list of v twice and contributes two to the degree of v.

This implementation uses an adjacency-lists representation, which is a vertex-indexed array of Bag objects. All operations take constant time (in the worst case) except iterating over the vertices adjacent to a given vertex, which takes time proportional to the number of such vertices.

0

When learning algorithms, the programming language (Java) should not be considered in deciding the representation. Each problem could benefit from a unique representation, and moreover designing it can add a bit of learning. Solve the problem first without relying on a particular language, then the representation for any particular language will flow naturally.

Of course, general representations and libraries are useful in real-world applications. But some of them could benefit from some customization as well. Use the other answers to know the different techniques available, but consider customization when appropriate.

-1
class Vertex {
    private String name;
    private int score; // for path algos
    private boolean visited; // for path algos
    List<Edge> connections;
}

class Edge {
    private String vertex1Name; // same as Vertex.name
    private String vertex2Name;
    private int length;
}

class Graph {
    private List<Edge> edges;
}
6
  • 2
    Your edge only knows the name of the Vertex. As such you could not traverse the graph with the structure you have shown.
    – bhspencer
    Feb 17, 2016 at 15:42
  • With additional logic of recreating the Node from its name, we could still do the traversing. I did this in favour of saving space so that we don't have to save the full vertices again in Edge. Its like saving just the primary key in a foreign table.
    – Asif
    Feb 17, 2016 at 20:30
  • 3
    When an object has a reference to another object as a class member it does not save the full object there. It is just a pointer to the other object. There is no data duplication if for example two edges reference the same vertex.
    – bhspencer
    Feb 17, 2016 at 22:25
  • Yes thanks and even if I saved only the names - how would I retrieve the full vertex without saving them in another map that maps names to vertices.
    – Asif
    Feb 18, 2016 at 2:13
  • You may well have another map for fast lookup of vertex by name as a side utility but in general implementations of a graph typically have vertices and edges that have direct references to each other. That way you can write a method that can traverse the graph simply by visiting the a vertex and following its edges.
    – bhspencer
    Feb 18, 2016 at 14:45

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