2

Why the parser using the rules below returns an empty container? There're 3 rules. One is for parsing a string of characters except double quote, the second parses a pair (e.g. "col1" : 2) and the third parses the vector of such pairs. The ouput of the program below in MSVS2012 is

parse success
result: '' : 0
result: '' : 0
result: '' : 0

.

namespace parsers
{

            spirit::qi::rule< iterator, column_name_t() > quoted_string = 
                    spirit::qi::lexeme["\"" >> +~spirit::qi::char_("\"") >> "\""];
                spirit::qi::rule< iterator, column_and_aggregate(), spirit::qi::space_type > agg_pair =
                    quoted_string//::boost::bind( &apply_col_and_aggr_visitor, spirit::qi::_val, spirit::qi::_1 )]
                    > ':'
                    // A rule validation technic is used below.
                    > spirit::int_[spirit::qi::_pass = (spirit::qi::_1 >=AVG && spirit::qi::_1<=SUM)];//::boost::bind( &apply_col_and_aggr_visitor, spirit::qi::_val, spirit::qi::_1 )];
                spirit::qi::rule< iterator, column_and_aggregate_container(), spirit::qi::space_type > aggregates_parser =
                      '{'
                    > agg_pair/*[phoenix::push_back(spirit::qi::_val, spirit::qi::_1)]*/ % ',' // N.B.!!! list-redux technic
                    > '}';
}
using namespace parsers;
using namespace boost::spirit;
bool doParse(const std::string& input)
{
    typedef std::string::const_iterator It;
    auto f(begin(input)), l(end(input));

    //parser<It, qi::space_type> p;
    column_and_aggregate_container data;
    typedef BOOST_TYPEOF(qi::space) skipper_type; 
    try
    {
        bool ok = qi::phrase_parse(f,l,aggregates_parser,qi::space,data);
        if (ok)   
        {
            std::cout << "parse success\n";
            for (auto& pair : data)
                std::cout << "result: '" << pair.first << "' : " << (int) pair.second << "\n";
        }
        else      std::cerr << "parse failed: '" << std::string(f,l) << "'\n";

        if (f!=l) std::cerr << "trailing unparsed: '" << std::string(f,l) << "'\n";
        return ok;
    }
    catch(const qi::expectation_failure<It>& e)
    {
        std::string frag(e.first, e.last);
        std::cerr << e.what() << "'" << frag << "'\n";
    }

    return false;
}

int main()
{
    //bool ok = doParse("{ 'column 1' : 1, 'column 2' : 0, 'column 3' : 1 }");
    doParse("{ \"column 1\" : 1, \"column 2\" : 0, \"column 3\" : 1 }");
    //return ok? 0 : 255;
}


template <typename it, typename skipper = qi::space_type>
struct quoted_string_parser
{
    quoted_string_parser()
    {
        using namespace qi;
        quoted_string %= lexeme['"' >> *~char_('"') >> '"'];
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(quoted_string);
    }
    qi::rule<it, std::string(), skipper> quoted_string;
};
template <typename it, typename skipper = qi::space_type>
struct aggregates_parser : qi::grammar<it, column_and_aggregate_container(), skipper>
{
    aggregates_parser() : aggregates_parser::base_type(aggregates_parser_)
    {
        using namespace qi;
        agg_pair %= quoted_string_parser<it,skipper> > ':' > int_[_pass = (qi::_1 >= AVG && qi::_1 <= SUM)];
        aggregates_parser_ = '{' > agg_pair % ',' > '}';
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(aggregates_parser_);
    }
  private:    
    qi::rule<it, sql_faggregate(), skipper> faggr;
    qi::rule<it, column_and_aggregate(), skipper> agg_pair;
    qi::rule<it, column_and_aggregate_container(), skipper> aggregates_parser_;
};
  • 2
    Since when is a vector containing 3 element pairs an "empty vector"? Also, why do you cripple the code so much in your question? I think the code was a lot more readable when I gave it to you. Also, presenting the question in readable form is a polite effort. Lastly, adding ~12 more lines could have made the code compilable. Why remove them? It's almost as if you don't want people to help. – sehe Jun 29 '13 at 22:59
  • Also, had you tried eliminating probable causes? Just commenting [spirit::qi::_pass = (spirit::qi::_1 >=AVG && spirit::qi::_1<=SUM)] made the problem disappear. This might have lead you to the relevant documentation. – sehe Jun 29 '13 at 23:07
  • Don't use using namespace boost::spirit. Instead do namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi. This will prevent a lot of problems with ADL/ambiguous identifiers. using namespace parsers; should go inside doParse (if at all). Finally, don't use boost::bind inside semantic actions. phoenix::bind is far superior as it understands Spirit's lazy placeholders. – sehe Jun 29 '13 at 23:14
  • 1
    In case you wanted to know, here's how to do the attribute propagation manually. The code review was free of charge :/ Cheers – sehe Jun 29 '13 at 23:16
  • 1
    (Note that that manual approach kept your <strike>messy</strike>"creative" code organization: it shows you exactly how you might do things when you don't want to do a proper grammar struct. I don't recommend doing this, obviously.) – sehe Jun 29 '13 at 23:28
5

Like I said in the answer right where I suggested this semantic action for validation:

enter image description here

When a semantic action is present, automatic attribute propagation does not normally occur. Using %= forces automatic attribute propagation (we want this because the semantic action doesn't assign the attribute value(s), it just validates them).

Again, a fully working demonstration, incorporating your rules:

#include <boost/fusion/adapted/std_pair.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix.hpp>

namespace qi    = boost::spirit::qi;
namespace phx   = boost::phoenix;

typedef std::string column_name_t;

enum sql_faggregate
{
    AVG,
    // ....
    SUM,
};

typedef std::pair<column_name_t, sql_faggregate> column_and_aggregate;
typedef std::vector<column_and_aggregate> column_and_aggregate_container;

template <typename It, typename Skipper = qi::space_type>
    struct parser : qi::grammar<It, column_and_aggregate_container(), Skipper>
{
    parser() : parser::base_type(aggregates_parser)
    {
        using namespace qi;
        quoted_string     = lexeme['"' >> +~char_('"') >> '"'];
        agg_pair         %= quoted_string > ':' // A rule validation technic is used below.
                            > int_[_pass = (_1 >=AVG && _1<=SUM)];

        aggregates_parser = '{' > agg_pair % ',' > '}';

        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(aggregates_parser);
    }

  private:
    qi::rule<It, std::string(), qi::space_type>           quoted_string;
    qi::rule<It, sql_faggregate(), qi::space_type>        faggr;
    qi::rule<It, column_and_aggregate(), qi::space_type>           agg_pair;
    qi::rule<It, column_and_aggregate_container(), qi::space_type> aggregates_parser;
};

bool doParse(const std::string& input)
{
    typedef std::string::const_iterator It;
    auto f(begin(input)), l(end(input));

    parser<It, qi::space_type> p;
    column_and_aggregate_container data;

    try
    {
        bool ok = qi::phrase_parse(f,l,p,qi::space,data);
        if (ok)   
        {
            std::cout << "parse success\n";
            for (auto& pair : data)
                std::cout << "result: '" << pair.first << "' : " << (int) pair.second << "\n";
        }
        else      std::cerr << "parse failed: '" << std::string(f,l) << "'\n";

        if (f!=l) std::cerr << "trailing unparsed: '" << std::string(f,l) << "'\n";
        return ok;
    } catch(const qi::expectation_failure<It>& e)
    {
        std::string frag(e.first, e.last);
        std::cerr << e.what() << "'" << frag << "'\n";
    }

    return false;
}

int main()
{
    bool ok = doParse("{ \"column 1\" : 1, \"column 2\" : 0, \"column 3\" : 1 }");
    return ok? 0 : 255;
}

Prints

parse success
result: 'column 1' : 1
result: 'column 2' : 0
result: 'column 3' : 1

as expected

  • What if I don't need gramatics structure, but only one rule? – alexander.sivak Jun 29 '13 at 23:23
  • Then you make only one rule. Can you tell me what the problem is with either? – sehe Jun 29 '13 at 23:23
  • The way I see it you use the namespace to contain the rules, but this (a) hardcodes the iterator and skipper (b) makes it hard for you to statically initialize them (e.g. using %=). (c) makes it hard to compose grammars (d) makes it harder to debug grammars. The way I see it, you could fix all of these by using the grammar struct and (optionally) marking the parser instance static const. – sehe Jun 29 '13 at 23:26
  • But how would u use validation in rules in my example without grammar? – alexander.sivak Jun 29 '13 at 23:28
  • 1
    No. It works everywhere. However, it will require %= assignment, which can not coincide with rule declaration. Therefore you need an initialization step. Nothing prevents you from initializing a global rule variable somewhere. However, all of this has nothing to do with Spirit (it's the same for variables of type int) and it comes with all the caveats of using global variables in the first place. – sehe Jun 29 '13 at 23:36

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