141

See edit at end for actual problem.

Ok, I have this scenario:

a = [false, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false]

Then if I do this:

a.sort(function(a,b){return !a && b});

It gives me this:

[false, false, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false]

It's sorta doing a sort... but not quite... :(

How do I sort this array?

EDIT:

If you are wondering why I did not use just a.sort() is because my actual array is of objects, not a plain array like the one I posted. The real one has elements that look like [{xx:true},{xx:false},...]

3
  • If I do a.map(function(x){ return x?1:0 }).sort(function(a,b){return a>b}); does not work either... I think I might be doing something elementary wrong
    – PCoelho
    Jun 30, 2013 at 5:25
  • why you need to write custom function? a.sort() should work Jun 30, 2013 at 5:36
  • 1
    is there are a way using lodash
    – Mina Fawzy
    Jun 12, 2019 at 18:10

13 Answers 13

312

a = [false, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false];
    
    
    a.sort(function(x, y) {
        // true values first
        return (x === y)? 0 : x? -1 : 1;
        // false values first
        // return (x === y)? 0 : x? 1 : -1;
    });
    
    console.log(a);

You must return 0 when a and b both have the same value, -1 if a is true and 1 otherwise.

13
  • 57
    Even shorter: a.sort(function(x, y) { return y - x }); Jun 30, 2013 at 5:33
  • 1
    @PCoelho, consider using Joe's solution. It works and is more concise.
    – c.P.u1
    Jun 30, 2013 at 5:41
  • 4
    @JoeFrambach Can you explain how that works or point me to a thread that explains the syntax for something like that?
    – Adam Moisa
    Feb 3, 2017 at 21:05
  • 12
    @AdamMoisa Joe's solution works because of something called Type Coercion. Basically, the JS engine will notice you're trying to do a math operation (subtraction) on boolean values, so it'll convert false into 0 and true into 1. Jul 9, 2018 at 23:58
  • 1
    @SilvestreHerrera No, there is no Type Coercion in the above example. According to the docs, developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…, the compareFunction needs to return -1,0, or 1, which will determine an element's position. The code example above uses nested ternary statements, which, in the case of the uncommented 'truthy values first' example says the following (in english) if x and y are strictly equal return 0, otherwise if x is true return -1 if not return 1; Mar 7, 2019 at 21:22
56

To prevent implicit type conversion (which languages like TypeScript don't like), you can use Number() to explicitly convert the boolean to a number:

a = [false, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false];
a.sort(function(x, y) {
   return Number(x) - Number(y);
});
console.log(a);

Or using arrow functions:

a = [false, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false];
a.sort((x, y) => Number(x) - Number(y));
console.log(a);

1
  • 3
    One caveat: this sort compare function will not work with 'undefined` values in input array
    – JabbyPanda
    Dec 4, 2020 at 9:37
48

a simpler way:

a = [{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false}];

a.sort(function(a,b){return a.xx-b.xx});

console.log(a);

you can call a.reverse() after the sort() if you want it sorted the other way..

EDIT: edited to reflect updated question of sorting an array of objects instead of an array of booleans.

2
  • 1
    @PranavNegandhi: what's wrong is that i answered the question before an edit re-defined it...
    – dandavis
    Jun 30, 2013 at 5:42
  • 4
    Great, just if you want it sorted the other way, swap the places of a and b in the sort function, instead of calling reverse().
    – Yulian
    Feb 12, 2020 at 17:24
28

An array does not have any equal positions, so why not leave away the equals check, and always return either -1 or 1. This approach works well with TS.

a.sort(x => x ? -1 : 1)

Note: I am a bit concerned how this affects internals of the sort function, but it seems to do the trick.

If you want to reverse sort

a.sort(x => !x ? -1 : 1)
2
  • 2
    perfect solution, i like your minimalistic approach
    – ogostos
    Mar 17, 2021 at 11:24
  • 2
    In the case when you're sorting objects, this approach doesn't guarantee objects with equal property values (i.e. a.xx === b.xx) stay in the same order with respect to each other.
    – Peter
    Mar 17, 2021 at 18:18
23

Simple solution:

[true, false, true, false].sort((a, b) => b - a)

console.log([true, false, true, false].sort((a, b) => b - a));

1
  • huh, I did not expect that false - true === -1, thanks for this!
    – mchl18
    Feb 24, 2021 at 14:02
3

PFB the solution worked for me in Typescript Angular 2 as well,

  let a = [{aa:"1",xx:true},{aa:"10",xx:false},{aa:"2",xx:true},{aa:"11",xx:false},{aa:"3",xx:true},{aa:"12",xx:false},{aa:"4",xx:true},{aa:"13",xx:false},{aa:"5",xx:true},{aa:"14",xx:false},{aa:"6",xx:true},{aa:"15",xx:false},{aa:"7",xx:true},{aa:"16",xx:false},{aa:"8",xx:true},{aa:"17",xx:false},{aa:"9",xx:true},{aa:"18",xx:false}];

    //a.sort(function(a,b){return a.xx-b.xx});
    a.sort(function (x, y) {
        // true values first
        return (x.xx === y.xx) ? 0 : x ? -1 : 1;
        // false values first
        // return (x === y)? 0 : x? 1 : -1;
    });
    return JSON.stringify(a);
1
  • Thank you for the object oriented way. it worked
    – Santosh
    Jan 12, 2021 at 6:51
3

I also ran into this issue, here is my part, I hope it helps:

orders.sort((x, y) => {
   if (x === y) return 0;
   if (x) return -1;
   return 1;
});
2

I wanted to see if I could do it without using the ? : operator, just for fun.

Note

This works on all sortable data types (strings, numbers), not just raw booleans. I'm not sure if this is faster than ? : and it's more convoluted. I just get sick of conditionals so it's just personal preference.

  var b = [false, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false]
  .sort((a,b) => Number(a > b) * 2 - 1);

I can turn that into a utility function and give it a meaningful name:

  var sortOrder = {
    asc: (a,b) => Number(a > b) * 2 - 1,
    desc: (a,b) => Number(a < b) * 2 - 1
  }

so then I can:

  var b = [false, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false]
  .sort(sortOrder.asc);
1
  • 2
    Note that sort works with any number not just -1 or 1. Therefore you could use (a, b) => Number(a > b) - 0.5 to avoid a multiplication. Jul 2, 2020 at 14:18
1

A pretty simple solution for the comparison function is to check if a < b, this gives 0 or 1 when converted to a number. We then want to map 0 to -1 and 1 to 1. To do that you can just multiply by 2 then subtract 1.

data.sort(function (a, b) {
  return (a < b) * 2 - 1
}

or just

data.sort((a, b) => (a < b) * 2 - 1)

Problem sorted!

If any of your values are null they are treated as false (null*2 === 0) and any value that is undefined will become NaN (undefined*2 === NaN) which should make it last in either sort direction.

1
a=[true,false,true,false,true];
 
a.sort(function(x, y) {
      a1=x?1:0
      b1=y?1:0
return a1-b1
    });
1

A boolean array with enough entries to represent all transitions i.e. true to true, true to false, false to false, false to true.

var boolarray = [true, false, true, true, false, false, true]
boolarray.sort( (a,b) => !(a ^ b) ? 0 : a ? -1 : 1)

The sort inverts the xor of the inputs. If the inputs are the same then return 0, if they are not then, if the 'a' input is true 'b' must be false so return -1, and vice versa return 1.

'a' and 'b' booleans are sorted when they differ and are ignored when the same.

To use this method with objects just use the object member names for the sort arguments:

var objarray = [{xx:true}, {xx:false}, {xx:true}, {xx:true}, {xx:false}, {xx:false}, {xx:true}]
objarray.sort( (a,b) => !(a.xx ^ b.xx) ? 0 : a.xx ? -1 : 1)
1
  • The '^' operator is not allowed for boolean types. Consider using '!==' instead.
    – Ste
    Jul 3 at 13:35
0

I got typescript errors on the return (x.xx === y.xx) ? 0 : x ? -1 : 1;

This is my solution when you want to sort on a boolean property

this.mediaList.sort( (a: MediaAutosubscriptionModel, b: MediaAutosubscriptionModel) => {
    let status1: number = a.status === StatusEnum.ACTIVE ? 1 : 0;
    let status2: number = b.status === StatusEnum.ACTIVE ? 1 : 0;
    let comparison: number = 0;
    let direction: number = this.sortDirection === SortDirectionsEnum.ASC ? -1 : 1;
    if (status1 > status2) {
        comparison = direction;
    } else if (status1 < status2) {
        comparison = -1 * direction;
    }
        return comparison;
    });
0

Without using any ES6 function with time and space optimization -

const data = [false, true, true, true, false, false, false, true];
let lastElementUnchecked;
for(let i=0; i<data.length; i++){
    if(data[i] && lastElementUnchecked !== undefined){
        let temp = data[i];
        data[i] = data[lastElementUnchecked];
        data[lastElementUnchecked] = temp;
        i = lastElementUnchecked;
        lastElementUnchecked = undefined;
    }else{
        if(!data[i] && lastElementUnchecked === undefined){
            lastElementUnchecked = i;
        }
    }
}
console.log(data)

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