9

Consider the following code snippet:

int fib(int N)
{
   if(N<2) return 1;
   return (fib(N-1) + fib(N-2));
}

Given that fib is called from main with N as 10,35,67,... (say), how many total calls are made to fib?

Is there any relation for this problem?

PS: This is a theoretical question and not supposed to be executed.

EDIT:

I am aware of other methods for the faster computation of Fibonacci series.

I want a solution for computing number of times fib is invoked for fib(40),fib(50) ,.. without the aid of compiler and in exam condition where you are supposed to answer 40 question similar to this one in a stipulated of time ( about 30 mints).

Thanks,

  • 1
    What are you trying to accomplish? Assuming you're not just looking for someone to answer your homework. – recursive Nov 15 '09 at 21:35
  • 4
    Is this a homework question? You shouldn't be asking other people to do your homework for you; you should at least show what you've tried so far and ask about the specific problem you've run into. – Brian Campbell Nov 15 '09 at 21:35
  • 1
    Related (almost-but-not-quite-dupe): stackoverflow.com/questions/360748/… – Stephan202 Nov 15 '09 at 21:51
  • No it's not a home work problem !! – whacko__Cracko Nov 15 '09 at 21:55
  • I would say it depends if you use memoization to keep the result of previously computed fibonacci numbers or not :) – Matthieu M. Nov 16 '09 at 12:23
13

Let f(n) be the number of calls made to calculate fib(n).

  • If n < 2 then f(n) = 1.
  • Otherwise, f(n) = 1 + f(n - 1) + f(n - 2).

So, f is at least O(fib(n)). In fact, f(n) is 2 * fib(n) - 1. We show this by induction:

  • Base cases (n < 2, that is, n = 0 or n = 1):
    • f(n) = 1 = 2 * 1 - 1 = 2 * fib(n) - 1.
  • Induction step (n >= 2):
    • f(n + 1) = f(n) + f(n - 1) + 1
    • f(n + 1) = 2 * fib(n) - 1 + 2 * fib(n - 1) - 1 + 1
    • f(n + 1) = 2 * fib(n + 1) - 1

There exist efficient ways to calculate any Fibonacci term. Thus the same holds for f(n).

  • Thanks,I know this Recurrence relation.I was inquisitive to solve it by some direct formula. In the paper it is given to find the value for Fib(40) which is actually 331160281.I wonder how will any solve it in about 30 secs (without compiler of-course) – whacko__Cracko Nov 15 '09 at 22:01
  • @nthrgeek: I hope that my update of the answer helps you answer that question. – Stephan202 Nov 15 '09 at 23:27
  • @Stephan202:Thanks,as I stated already I am aware of the faster algorithms for generating nth Fibonacci numbers. Your induction steps are correct but still not possible for computing f(40) manually within very short time. – whacko__Cracko Nov 16 '09 at 2:20
  • @nthrgeek: you're not supposed to apply the induction, but instead go with the formula f(n) = 2 * fib(n) - 1. Since, as you state, you do have a fast algorithm to calculate Fibonacci numbers, this solves the problem. Right? – Stephan202 Nov 16 '09 at 8:19
  • Note that this uses the definition of the Fibonacci sequence where F₀ = 1 (as defined in the question). If you're expecting F₀ = 0, then you get f(n) = 2 • fib(n+1) - 1. – DaoWen Jun 20 '17 at 14:15
4

Is there any relation for this problem ?

There is a close-form equation for the nth fibonacci number: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number#Closed_form_expression

In the pseudocode you posted, the number of calls satisfies the recurrence relation

x(n) = x(n-1) + x(n-2) +1   # for n>=2
x(1) = 1
x(0) = 1

This is almost same as the Fibonacci recurrence relation. Proof by induction can show that the number of calls to fib made by fib(n) is equal to 2*fib(n)-1, for n>=0.

Of course, the calculation can be sped up by using the closed form expression, or by adding code to memorize previously computed values.

  • Shouldn't that be x(n) = x(n-1) + x(n-2) + 1? – Stephan202 Nov 15 '09 at 21:46
  • @David: we're talking about the number of function calls, not the actual Fibonacci sequence. E.g. fib(0) and fib(1) require 1 call, but fib(2) requires 3 calls (not 2!): the call itself, and two recursive calls. – Stephan202 Nov 15 '09 at 22:02
  • Stephan202, thanks for pointing that out. I've corrected my answer. – unutbu Nov 15 '09 at 22:19
  • @~unutbu: did you actually perform the proof by induction? I think that formula is incorrect (see my answer). – Stephan202 Nov 15 '09 at 23:25
  • Thanks again Stephan202. That was sloppy of me. I would up-vote your answer some more if I could. – unutbu Nov 16 '09 at 0:13
3

As mentioned above, you need to solve the following recurring equation: K(n)=K(n-1)+K(n-2)+1

Let's write it for n-1: K(n-1)=K(n-2)+K(n-3)+1

Now, subtract the second one from the first one: K(n)-K(n-1) = K(n-1) - K(n-3),

or

K(n) - 2*K(n-1) + K(n-3) = 0.

The respective characteristic equation will be: x^3 - 2*x^2 + 1 = 0.

It has the following roots: 1, (1+sqrt(5))/2, (1-sqrt(5))/2

Thus for any real A,B,C the following function K(n) = A*(1)^n + B*((1+sqrt(5))/2)^n + C*((1-sqrt(5))/2)^n

will be a solution for your equation.

To find A,B,C you need to define several initial values K(0), K(1), K(2) and solve the system of equations.

  • 1
    -1. K(n) - 2*K(n-1) + K(n-3) = 0 does not translate to x^3 - 2*x^2 + 1 = 0... K(n) isn't x^3, K(n-1) isn't x^2, and K(n-3) certainly isn't 1. At best, you can translate K(n) - 2*K(n-1) + K(n-3) = 0 into x - 2*y + z = 0 unless you can prove a relationship between these variables. Misleading answer. – Neil Dec 12 '12 at 11:07
  • Neil, answer is not misleading. You'd better read about using characteristic equations to solve linear recurrences. Here's the link: [hcmop.wordpress.com/2012/04/20/… – Dmitry Shkolnik Mar 6 '13 at 0:49
2

phi is a constant

position = ceil(log((n - 0.5)*sqrt(5))/log(phi));

n is the fibonacci number... position will give you the which fibonacci number is n

for example given 13 , position will be 7 - 0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13

using this position just calculate the fibonacci number at position-1 or any position you want relative to given fibonacci number.

Previous Fibo Num = floor((pow(phi,position-1)/sqrt(5))+0.5);

floor((pow(phi, position)/sqrt(5))+0.5) - is the standard formula for calculating Nth fibonacci num (Note - This is not an approximation)

I have just reverse this formula to calculate the position and use the position - 1 to calculate the previous fibonacci number.

Ref - http://itpian.com/Coding/20951-Given-the-Nth-fib-no-and-find-the--N-1-th-fib-number-without-calculating-from-the-beginning---------.aspx

1

This is a classic problem for solving with Recurrence Relations.

Specifically, the fibonacci problem has the following parameters:

f(0) = 1
f(1) = 1
f(n) = f(n-1) + f(n-2)

Once you master solving recurrences, you'll have no problem reaching the solution (which, incidently, is exactly the same as fib(n)).

1

Interesting question, I can't give you a formula, but I wrote a Ruby program to do it, it works on numbers I figured out on paper, and it should work for any.

#!/usr/bin/ruby
#find out how many times fib() would need to be called

def howmany(n)
    a = [ ]
    a.push n-1
    a.push n-2
    while a.select{|n| n > 2}.length > 0
        a.map! do |n|
            n > 2 ? [n-1,n-2] : n
        end
        a.flatten!
    end
    a.length
end

.

>> howmany(10)
=> 55

It's slow.. I'm figuring out 35 right now, I'll edit when it finishes.

Edit:

>> howmany(35)
=> 9227465

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