11

Can someone please give me guidance on getting the primenumbers here? This is homework so I don't want the answer but some pointers would be greatly appreciated. It's really annoying me :(

I think I'm close. But this problems I have are number 25 and 35. These are not prime but this function is returning them

var getPrimeNumber = function(n) {
    if(n === 1) return "";
    else if(n == 2) return 2;
    else if(n == 3) return 3;
    else { 
        for(i=Math.floor(Math.sqrt(n)); i>=2; i--){
            //console.log(i);//maybe another var in here? 
            if(n%i !==0 && n%2 !==0 && n%3 !== 0)
                return n; // 25/Math.sqrt(25) will be equal to zero this is what gives me 25 !!!   
        } 
    }
};
  • what do you want in return when number is not prime – bugwheels94 Jun 30 '13 at 10:23
  • Think about the numbers involved. Why is 25 not prime? Why is 35 not prime? How about 49? You'll run into 121 before long too. – Michael Geary Jun 30 '13 at 10:27
  • What exactly is this function supposed to do? Get you the first n prime numbers, get you all prime numbers till n, or check whether n is a prime number? – Bergi Jun 30 '13 at 12:44
  • @Ankit - it currently return "" (blank string) – HattrickNZ Jun 30 '13 at 21:32
  • @Bergi numbers are passed to this func (1-30 for E.G.) and it returns an array, only it has the number 25 in there which I'm looking to fix. tks for all the other replies I'll work through them – HattrickNZ Jun 30 '13 at 21:36

10 Answers 10

17

Based on this page, this would be a method for determining if a number is a prime number:

function isPrime(number) {
    let start = 2;
    const limit = Math.sqrt(number);
    while (start <= limit) {
        if (number % start++ < 1) return false;
    }
    return number > 1;
}

In node.js it takes about 250Ms for determining the prime numbers between 2 and 100.000.

See also ...

  • what does this line do? 'return number<=1 ? false : true;' – HattrickNZ Jul 1 '13 at 8:02
  • It returns false if the given number is smaller then or equals 1. ? : is a ternary operator, see javascript.about.com/od/byexample/a/ternary-example.htm – KooiInc Jul 1 '13 at 8:08
  • why not do "return number > 1;" instead of "return number<=1 ? false : true;"? – bstst Nov 10 '13 at 14:36
  • 1
    @AlbertoArena: thnx. If you want to see more of it in action, check jsfiddle.net/KooiInc/x7mogd2g/embedded/result,js,html,css – KooiInc Feb 17 '15 at 15:41
  • 2
    @kooilnc You can perhaps tweak the performance a bit more by checking if a number is divisible by 2 in start, return false. This way later you will need to increment start (the divisor) as start+=2 to skip all even numbers. – choc Jan 24 '16 at 0:31
6

Here's the fastest way to calculate primes in JavaScript, based on the previous prime value.

function nextPrime(value) {
    if (value > 2) {
        var i, q;
        do {
            i = 3;
            value += 2;
            q = Math.floor(Math.sqrt(value));
            while (i <= q && value % i) {
                i += 2;
            }
        } while (i <= q);
        return value;
    }
    return value === 2 ? 3 : 2;
}

Test

var value, result = [];
for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    value = nextPrime(value);
    result.push(value);
}
console.log("Primes:", result);

Output

Primes: [ 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29 ]

It is very fast, because:

  • It aligns the loop limit to an integer;
  • It uses a shorter iteration loop, skipping even numbers.

It can give you the first 100,000 primes in about 130ms, or the first 1m primes in about 4 seconds.

    function nextPrime(value) {
        if (value > 2) {
            var i, q;
            do {
                i = 3;
                value += 2;
                q = Math.floor(Math.sqrt(value));
                while (i <= q && value % i) {
                    i += 2;
                }
            } while (i <= q);
            return value;
        }
        return value === 2 ? 3 : 2;
    }

    var value, result = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        value = nextPrime(value);
        result.push(value);
    }

    display("Primes: " + result.join(', '));

    function display(msg) {
        document.body.insertAdjacentHTML(
            "beforeend",
            "<p>" + msg + "</p>"
        );
    }

  • nextPrime(7) returns 11 and nextPrime(8) returns 10. I believe this method is quite bugged. – Flame_Phoenix Dec 9 '15 at 9:58
  • 2
    @Flame_Phoenix if you run the test, you will see it works perfectly. Method nextPrime expects that you pass it a prime, that's how it can optimize calculation for the next prime. 8 is not a prime, you should not pass it in. Quote: >Here's the fastest way to calculate primes in JavaScript, based on the previous prime value. – vitaly-t Dec 9 '15 at 10:47
  • Ahhh, my bad, I apologize ! – Flame_Phoenix Dec 9 '15 at 10:52
  • 1
    @Flame_Phoenix no worries, and I have just added a code snippet ;) – vitaly-t Dec 9 '15 at 11:13
3

There is a function that will return true if the number is prime and false if it is not:

function isPrime(x){     
      d = x-1;
      while (d > 1){
        if ((x % d) == 0) return false;
        d--;
      }
      return true;
    }

Checkout the demo: http://jsbin.com/velapabedi/1/

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
  <meta charset="utf-8">
  <title>JS Bin</title>
  
  <script>
    function isPrime(x){     
      d = x-1;
      while (d > 1){
        if ((x % d) == 0) return false;
        d--;
      }
      return true;       
      
    }
    
    
    if (isPrime(41)){
      alert('Prime');
    }
    else{
      alert('Not Prime');
    }
  </script>
</head>
<body>

</body>
</html>

1

I considered the following in my implementation: Prime numbers are "natural numbers" and it is possible for negative values to be prime numbers. This is a more definitive solution with input sanitation:

function isPrime(num) {
    //check if value is a natural numbers (integer)
    //without this check, it returns true
    if (isNaN(num) || num % 1 !== 0) {
        return false;
    }
    num = Math.abs(num); //*negative values can be primes
    if (num === 0 || num === 1) {
        return false;
    }
    var maxFactorNum = Math.sqrt(num);
    for (var i = 2; i <= maxFactorNum; i++) {
        if (num % i === 0) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

//this method in action
for (var i = 1; i <= 40; i++) {
    console.log(i + (isPrime(i) ? ", isPrime" : ""));
}
//checking anomalies
console.log(isPrime(1.22));
console.log(isPrime(1.44));
console.log(isPrime("string"));

I hope my answer proves to be more readable code that also uses best practices. For example, some answers leave the square root calculation in the loop causing the method to run that calculation on every loop.

1

Here's a simple "sieve" for prime numbers, which can be easily understood, and although it is a naive approach (as opposed to sophisticated efficient prime number tests such as the AKS test), it is pretty fast (10000 numbers tested in < 1 sec). It stores the found prime numbers in the array prim[] and tests by using the modulo function (%):

The loop tests against already found prime numbers and exits if it is no prime number, i.e. if the modulo result is 0 (regard the expression i % prim[j])===0). Otherwise, it adds it to the list of found prime numbers.

Note that because the only even prime number is 2, the loop step is 2 rather then 1, because from 3 onwards there can't be any further even prime numbers.

var MaxNum = 10000;
var prim;

function Main() {
  MaxNum = GetMaxNum();
  prim = CalculatePrimes(MaxNum);
  CheckSome();
}

function CalculatePrimes(pMaxNum) {
  Console.WriteLine("Calculating until " + pMaxNum + "...");
  var _prim = [2];
  if (pMaxNum > 2) {
    for (var i = 3; i < pMaxNum; i += 2) {
      var is_prim = true;
      if (_prim.length > 0) {
        for (var j = 0; j < _prim.length; j++) {
          if ((i % _prim[j]) === 0) {
            is_prim = false;
            break;
          }
        }
      }
      if (is_prim) {
        _prim.push(i);
      }
    }
  }
  Console.WriteLine("Prime numbers:");
  for (var i = 0; i < _prim.length; i++) {
    Console.Write(_prim[i] + " ");
  }
  Console.WriteLine();
  Console.WriteLine("Found " + _prim.length + " prime numbers.");
  Console.WriteLine();
  return _prim;
}

// test some individual pre-calculated numbers

function CheckSome() {
  var num1 = prim[prim.length - 1];
  var num2 = num1 - 1;
  Console.WriteLine("Test: " + num1.toString() + ". Is it a prime number? " + Is_prime(num1));
  Console.WriteLine("Test: " + num2.toString() + ". Is it a prime number? " + Is_prime(num2));
}

function Is_prime(n) {
  if (n > MaxNum) throw "ERROR: n must be <" + MaxNum + "!";
  if (prim.indexOf(n) === -1)
    return false;
  else
    return true;
};


// ------------ HELPERS to display on screen ------------
var Console = {
  Section: 1,
  SectionId: "#section1",
  NewSection: function() {
    var $currentSection = $(this.SectionId);
    this.Section++;
    this.SectionId = "#section" + this.Section.toString();
    $currentSection.before('<div id="section' + this.Section.toString() + '"></div>');
  },
  Write: function(str) {
    $(this.SectionId).append(str);
  },
  WriteLine: function(str) {
    if (str !== undefined && str !== null && str !== "") this.Write(str);
    this.Write("<br/>");
  }
};


var GetMaxNum = function() {
  var result = $("#MaxNumSelect option:selected").val();
  return result;
}

$(document).ready(function() {
  $("#MaxNumSelect").change(function() {
    MaxNum = GetMaxNum();
    Console.NewSection();
    Main();
    Console.WriteLine("---------------------------------");
  });
  Main();
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div>Select max number:&nbsp;
  <select id="MaxNumSelect">
    <option value="10000" default="default">10000</option>
    <option value="100">100</option>
    <option value="1000">1000</option>
    <option value="100000">100000</option>
  </select>
</div>

<div id="results">
  <div id="section1"></div>
</div>

In the above example, we have tested the first 10000 natural numbers. To decide if a given number is a prime number, you simply check if it is contained in the array prim:

function Is_prime(n) {
    if (n>MaxNum) throw "ERROR: n must be <"+CalcToNum+"!";
    if (prim.indexOf(n)===-1)
      return false;
    else
      return true;
};

Of course, in order for this to work the prime numbers need to be pre-calculated.

Example: alert(Is_prime(25)); - returns false, because 25 is no prime number.

Note: The number range must be checked, because the function Is_prime can decide only for numbers which are previously tested by the sieve above. If the array is too small for the number to check (i.e. if not enough prime numbers are pre-calculated), an error is thrown.

0

In your if statement you got

if(n%i !==0 && n%2 !==0 && n%3 !== 0)

you for loop is going till i >= 2, so the n%2 !== 0 is useless, when i = 2, your if would look like:

if(n%2 !==0 && n%2 !==0 && n%3 !== 0)

Thats 2x the same check, the same is for n%3, its already checked :).

you should keep a bool to check the n%i !== 0, if it never reach this it's a prime.

Good luck with your homework :).

0

You should return a bool value and new function can be:

function(n) {
    if(n === 1) { return false;}
    else if(n == 2) { return true;}
    else if(n == 3) { return true;}
    else { 
        for(i=Math.floor(Math.sqrt(n));i>=2;i--){
            //console.log(i);//maybe another var in here? 
                if(n%i ==0 || n%2 ==0 || n%3 == 0) {return false;} 
        } 
        }
    return true;
};

In the OP, the control if(n%i !==0 && n%2 !==0 && n%3 !== 0) {return n;} was problematic because even if only single i satisfies this condition, the function returns the number as prime.

  • 1
    and might call the function isPrimeNumber() (imo) – Dominic Bartl Jun 30 '13 at 10:27
0
function isPrime(number) {

  // Immediate exit cases
  switch(true){
    case (number < 2):
      return console.log("Please enter a number greater than or equal to 2.")
    case (number === 2 || number === 3):
      return console.log(number + " is a prime number!")
  }

  // Process number if it does not meet above requirements
  var num = Math.floor(Math.sqrt(number))

  for(var i = 2; i <= num; i++) {
    if(number % i === 0)
      return console.log(number + " is not a prime number")
    else
      return console.log(number + " is a prime number!")
  } 
}

isPrime(27) // 27 is a prime number!
isPrime(30) // 30 is not a prime number
isPrime(55) // 55 is a prime number!
isPrime(2)  // 2 is a prime number!
-1

This is my Answer !

var isPrime = function (n) {
  if (n<2) {
    return false
  }else if (n = 2) {
    return true
  }
  for (var i = 2; i < n; i++) {
    if (n%i === 0) {
      return false
    }else if (i === n-1) {
      return true
    }
  }
}
console.log(isPrime(7));

-2

Do you want to know how to determine a number is prime or composite. This code make you understand easily. Input from a number 2.

var p = prompt("Insert a number for check","");
var x = " is a prime number";
for(i=2; i<p; i++){
    if(p%i === 0){
        x = " is a composite number";
        break;
    }
}
alert(p+x);
  • Why i < p? Why not i < Math.floor(p/2)? – rink.attendant.6 Sep 19 '13 at 6:12

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