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I am trying to create a countdown timer in Arduino that will start at the push of a button, and that will also abort at the push of the same button. The value is between 0 - 60 and set by a potentiometer. The problem I have so far is that I cannot exit the loop after it starts. I know that it can be done using the 'break', but I can't figure out where to put it that the result will be as desired. This is what I have so far:

const int  buttonPin = 2;    // The pin that the pushbutton is attached to
int buttonState = 0;         // Current state of the button
int lastButtonState = 0;     // Previous state of the button

void setup() {
    // initialize serial communication:
    Serial.begin(9600);
}

void timer(){
    int pot_value = analogRead(A0); //read potentiometer value
    if (pot_value > 17) { //i set it so, that it doesn't start before the value
                          //isn't greater than the 60th part of 1023
        int timer_value = map(pot_value, 0, 1023, 0, 60); //Mapping pot values to timer
        for (int i = timer_value; i >= 0; i--){ //Begin the loop
            Serial.println(i);
            delay(1000);
        }
    }
}

void loop() {
  // Read the pushbutton input pin:
  buttonState = digitalRead(buttonPin);

  // Compare the buttonState to its previous state
  if (buttonState != lastButtonState) {
    if (buttonState == HIGH) {
      // If the current state is HIGH then the button
      // went from off to on:
      timer(); //run timer
    }
    else {
      // If the current state is LOW then the button
      // went from on to off:
      Serial.println("off");
    }
  }
  // Save the current state as the last state,
  //for next time through the loop
  lastButtonState = buttonState;
}

For example, if I set the potentiometer to 5 and push the button I see 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0, off, but I cannot break out of it if I push the button again until it finishes. How can I escape this loop on the push of a button?

1

I notice the post has been here for a year now, but just in case anyone is still looking for an answer...

To breakout of loop(){}? Have you tried calling

return;

Wherever you want it to exit that loop? like:

void loop(){
  buttonState = digitalRead(buttonPin);
  if (buttonState == quitLoopState) {   
      delay(loopDelay); 
      return; 
  }

  continueOperationOtherwise();
  delay(loopDelay); 
}

You can always put delay code at the top of the method to avoid code repetition and avoid accidentally skipping it due to early break out of loop.

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The problem I have so far is that I cannot exit the loop after it starts.

In your code, you create the following loop:

for (int i = timer_value; i >= 0; i--){ //Begin the loop
    Serial.println(i);
    delay(1000);
}

It is inside a function that gets called when the button is pushed. To break out of the loop, you simply have to add a break; statement inside that loop. But the problem is how to check for the condition that will help you break out of the loop?

You'd need to check again the input pin (using the digitalRead) inside the loop. But why check two times the state of one single button inside a simple algorithm?

That's why I'm suggesting you another take on your problem, by using a single loop, the loop() function, use a set of three state variables:

  • last_button_state for detecting the transition states of the button
  • count_down for knowing whether we're in a count down or not
  • count_down_value the actual value of the countdown

The last two values could be merged into one (for example, set count_down to -1 to tell that we're not in a count-down state), but I left those two state variables out for clarity.

#define BUTTON_PIN 42

void setup() {
    Serial.begin(9600);
    pinMode(BUTTON_PIN, INPUT);
}

// State variables
uint8_t last_button_state = LOW;
bool count_down;
uint8_t count_down_value;

void loop() {
    int pot_value;

    // Read the pushbutton input pin:
    uint8_t button_state = digitalRead(buttonPin);

    if (button_state != last_button_state) {
        Serial.println("BUTTON STATE CHANGED");
        // On button press
        if (button_state == HIGH) {
            Serial.println("BUTTON PRESS");
            // Starts the count down if the value of potentiometer is high enough
            pot_value = analogRead(A0);
            if (pot_value > 17) {
                Serial.println("POT IS HIGH ENOUGH");
                if (count_down == false) {
                    Serial.println("ENABLING THE COUNT DOWN");
                    count_down = true;
                    count_down_value = map(pot_value, 0, 1023, 0, 60);
                } else {
                    Serial.println("DISABLING THE COUNT DOWN");
                    count_down = false;
                }
            }
        } else {
            Serial.println("BUTTON RELEASE");
        }
    }
    Serial.println("STORING BUTTON STATE");
    // Save button state for next iteration
    last_button_state = button_state;

    // If the countdown is running
    if (count_down == true) {
        Serial.println("RUNNING COUNTDOWN");
        // If the last value has been shown, show last value and stop the countdown
        if (count_down_value == 0) {
            Serial.println("BOOM!");
            count_down = false;
        // Otherwise decrements the value
        } else {
            // Prints out the value
            Serial.println(count_down_value);
            // Wait
            delay(1000);
            --count_down_value;
        }
    }
    delay(500); // Not to flood output
}

There I'd expect the following output:

<Press button>
BUTTON STATE CHANGED
BUTTON PRESS
POT IS HIGH ENOUGH
ENABLING THE COUNT DOWN
STORING BUTTON STATE
RUNNING COUNTDOWN
142
STORING BUTTON STATE
RUNNING COUNTDOWN
141
<Release button>
BUTTON STATE CHANGED
BUTTON RELEASE
STORING BUTTON STATE
RUNNING COUNTDOWN
140
<Press button>
BUTTON STATE CHANGED
BUTTON PRESS
POT IS HIGH ENOUGH
DISABLING THE COUNT DOWN
STORING BUTTON STATE
STORING BUTTON STATE
<Release button>
BUTTON STATE CHANGED
BUTTON RELEASE
STORING BUTTON STATE
...

So now, there are only two possible scenarios:

  • Press the button, countdown starts, countdown iterates, countdown ends and stops
  • Press the button, countdown starts, countdown iterates, press the button, countdown stops

If the potentiometer is at 0, the button is disabled.

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  • Thank you for your help Sir. The code you provided works (after correcting a few typos :)), but the result is not as expected. Now the countdown goes down only if i keep the button pressed, which is still not good...Any ideas on how to fix that as well?
    – skamsie
    Jun 30 '13 at 16:48
  • @HerrActress oh sorry, the reason was in my comments. Indeed, if I change count_down state on button release, it will not work as expected :-) I moved that to the button press state, making a flipping state on count_down.
    – zmo
    Jun 30 '13 at 20:23
  • @ zmo Unfortunately now the result is exactly as i had it in the beginning. The countdown starts but a button press does not stop it...I guess the solution would be to check if the condition is still true during the countdown iteration, after each item is printed. Unfortunately my C knowledge is almost 0 as i did not use it before starting to fiddle with arduino :) So i am counting on any response i get. thanks again
    – skamsie
    Jun 30 '13 at 20:48
  • @HerrActress add printouts everywhere the state changes, afaict the logic seems good to me. See my edits. I also fixed the typos.
    – zmo
    Jun 30 '13 at 21:23
  • Yes it works now, probably worked before, but you just need to keep the button pressed a little more. But now there's another problem...The pot values are not correct anymore(having it at maximum only shows 14...). Any ideas why? Thanks
    – skamsie
    Jul 1 '13 at 6:18
0

I know it has been a while since this was active, but a big issue I can see with the previous answer is the use of delays, where if I am reading it correctly it gives 1.5 second counts, instead of 1 second.

A better answer would calculate the time since it last counted down and then count down if it is 1 second or above. It might be a bit off, but it is much closer to the 1 second.

It also solves another issue that the button can only exist between these delays, giving a short time every 1.5 second or so, so you could need to hold down the button for 1.5 seconds to stop it, rather than just push it to stop it.

I would do something more like this:

const int  buttonPin = 2;   // The pin that the pushbutton is attached to
int buttonState = 0;        // Current state of the button
int lastButtonState = 0;    // Previous state of the button
int timer_value = 0;        // The timer that you want.
int last_count = 0;         // The time the counter last counted down.

void setup() {
    // initialize serial communication:
    Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop() {
  // Read the pushbutton input pin:
  buttonState = digitalRead(buttonPin);

  // Compare the buttonState to its previous state
  if (buttonState != lastButtonState) {
    if (buttonState == HIGH) {
      // If the current state is HIGH then the button
      // went from off to on:
      if(timer_value) {
        //checks to see if countdown is in progress, if 0, there is no count down.
        timer_value=0;
      }
      else {
        //The timer is not running, therefore start it.
        int pot_value = analogRead(A0); //read potentiometer value
        if (pot_value > 17) { //i set it so, that it doesn't start before the value
                              //isn't greater than the 60th part of 1023
            int timer_value = map(pot_value, 0, 1023, 0, 60); //Mapping pot values to timer.
            last_count = millis();  //sets up the timer to start counting.
            Serial.println(timer_value);  //Outputs the start of the timer.
        }
      }
    }
    else {
      // If the current state is LOW then the button
      // went from on to off:
      Serial.println("off");
    }
  }
  // Save the current state as the last state,
  //for next time through the loop
  lastButtonState = buttonState;
  
  //Check to see if counting down
  if(timer_value){
    //The timer is runing.
    //Check to see if it is time to count
    //Calculate how long since last count to see if it is greater than 1 s (1000 ms), if so, it needs to count down.
    if(millis() - last_count >= 1000) {
      //Time to count down.
      timer_value--;
      last_count = last_count + 1000;
      Serial.println(timer_value);
    }
  }
}

This way the button is checked every loop and the loop is run continually rather than pausing for the second waiting for it to count down, and it will count every second.

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