I have two arrays.

array=(
  Vietnam
  Germany
  Argentina
)
array2=(
  Asia
  Europe
  America
)

I want to loop over these two arrays simulataneously, i.e. invoke a command on the first elements of the two arrays, then invoke the same command on the second elements, and so on. Pseudocode:

for c in $(array[*]}
do
  echo -e " $c is in ......"
done

How can i do this?

From anishsane's answer and the comments therein we now know what you want. Here's the same thing in a bashier style, using a for loop. See the Looping Constructs section in the reference manual. I'm also using printf instead of echo.

#!/bin/bash

array=( "Vietnam" "Germany" "Argentina" )
array2=( "Asia" "Europe" "America" )

for ((i=0;i<${#array[@]};++i)); do
    printf "%s is in %s\n" "${array[i]}" "${array2[i]}"
done

Another possibility would be to use an associative array:

#!/bin/bash

declare -A continent

continent[Vietnam]=Asia
continent[Germany]=Europe
continent[Argentina]=America

for c in "${!continent[@]}"; do
    printf "%s is in %s\n" "$c" "${continent[$c]}"
done

Depending on what you want to do, you might as well consider this second possibility. But note that you won't easily have control on the order the fields are shown in the second possibility (well, it's an associative array, so it's not really a surprise).

  • I think it's -a not -A – Brian Sep 13 '13 at 13:52
  • 1
    @Brian -a is for indexed arrays (i.e., regular ones), and -A is for associative arrays (hash tables), so in this case -A is correct. – gniourf_gniourf Sep 13 '13 at 14:31
  • hmm, wonder why -A doesn't work with declare then – Brian Sep 13 '13 at 15:02
  • 2
    @Brian maybe you have an old version of bash. Associative arrays appeared in bash 4. If it's the case, you can only use the first example of my post, not the second one. – gniourf_gniourf Sep 13 '13 at 18:05
  • Perhaps that is it. I didn't know that. I went ahead with your first example. Thank you – Brian Sep 13 '13 at 18:16

If all of the arrays are ordered correctly just pass around the index.

array=(
  Vietnam
  Germany
  Argentina
)
array2=(
  Asia
  Europe
  America
)

for index in ${!array[*]}; do 
  echo "${array[$index]} is in ${array2[$index]}"
done

Vietnam is in Asia
Germany is in Europe
Argentina is in America

You need a loop over array & array2

i=0
while [ $i -lt ${#array[*]} ]; do
    echo ${array[$i]} is in ${array2[$i]}
    i=$(( $i + 1));
done

Vietnam is in Asia
Germany is in Europe
Argentina is in America

Alternately, you can use this option (without loop):

paste <(tr ' ' '\n' <<< ${array[*]}) <(tr ' ' '\n' <<< ${array2[*]}) | sed 's/\t/ is in /'
  • 3
    I GUESS this is what you want. – anishsane Jul 1 '13 at 11:40
  • THANKS!!! Work perfect!!!! – user2354862 Jul 1 '13 at 11:46
  • @user2354862 If it does, you should accept the answer. – Ansgar Wiechers Jul 1 '13 at 11:54
  • 2
    or, avoid spawning tr twice: paste <(printf "%s\n" "${array[@]}") <(printf "%s\n" "${array2[@]}") | sed 's/\t/ is in /' – glenn jackman Nov 4 '14 at 21:36

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