20

1) std::call_once

A a;
std::once_flag once;

void f ( ) {
    call_once ( once, [ ] { a = A {....}; } );
}

2) function-level static

A a;

void f ( ) {
    static bool b = ( [ ] { a = A {....}; } ( ), true );
}
2
  • 1
    Your two examples are not equivalent, call_once ignores the return value of the callable object you pass it. You probably want to assign to a in both lambda expressions. Commented Jul 1, 2013 at 15:17
  • yes, i forgot to change first one. fixed
    – pal
    Commented Jul 1, 2013 at 15:44

3 Answers 3

16

For your example usage, hmjd's answer fully explains that there is no difference (except for the additional global once_flag object needed in the call_once case.) However, the call_once case is more flexible, since the once_flag object isn't tied to a single scope. As an example, it could be a class member and be used by more than one function:

class X {
  std::once_flag once;

  void doSomething() {
    std::call_once(once, []{ /* init ...*/ });
    // ...
  }

  void doSomethingElse() {
    std::call_once(once, []{ /*alternative init ...*/ });
    // ...
  }
};

Now depending on which member function is called first the initialization code can be different (but the object will still only be initialized once.)

So for simple cases a local static works nicely (if supported by your compiler) but there are some less common uses that might be easier to implement with call_once.

8

Both code snippets have the same behaviour, even in the presence of exceptions thrown during initialization.

This conclusion is based on (my interpretation of) the following quotes from the c++11 standard (draft n3337):

  • 1 Section 6.7 Declaration statement clause 4 states:

The zero-initialization (8.5) of all block-scope variables with static storage duration (3.7.1) or thread storage duration (3.7.2) is performed before any other initialization takes place. Constant initialization (3.6.2) of a block-scope entity with static storage duration, if applicable, is performed before its block is first entered. An implementation is permitted to perform early initialization of other block-scope variables with static or thread storage duration under the same conditions that an implementation is permitted to statically initialize a variable with static or thread storage duration in namespace scope (3.6.2). Otherwise such a variable is initialized the first time control passes through its declaration; such a variable is considered initialized upon the completion of its initialization. If the initialization exits by throwing an exception, the initialization is not complete, so it will be tried again the next time control enters the declaration. If control enters the declaration concurrently while the variable is being initialized, the concurrent execution shall wait for completion of the initialization.88 If control re-enters the declaration recursively while the variable is being initialized, the behavior is undefined.

This means that in:

void f ( ) {
    static bool b = ( [ ] { a = A {....}; } ( ), true );
}

b is guaranteed to be initialized once only, meaning the lambda is executed (successfully) once only, meaning a = A {...}; is executed (successfully) once only.

  • 2 Section 30.4.4.2 Function call-once states:

An execution of call_once that does not call its func is a passive execution. An execution of call_once that calls its func is an active execution. An active execution shall call INVOKE (DECAY_COPY ( std::forward(func)), DECAY_COPY (std::forward(args))...). If such a call to func throws an exception the execution is exceptional, otherwise it is returning. An exceptional execution shall propagate the exception to the caller of call_once. Among all executions of call_once for any given once_flag: at most one shall be a returning execution; if there is a returning execution, it shall be the last active execution; and there are passive executions only if there is a returning execution.

This means that in:

void f ( ) {
    call_once ( once, [ ] { a = A {....}; } );

the lambda argument to std::call_once is executed (successfully) once only, meaning a = A {...}; is executed (successfully) once only.

In both cases a = A{...}; is executed (successfully) once only.

1
  • 3
    It may be unnecessarily pedantic, but I think that the standard language (at least the parts quoted - there may be other sections that clarify it more) does not necessarily imply that the lambda will only be executed once, but only that the computed result will only be assigned to the variable once. The granularity of what gets protected against parallel execution may be unspecified or implementation-defined.
    – twalberg
    Commented Jul 1, 2013 at 17:30
0

The following class can be used as a member of another class (satisfying the case above where functions want to share a call_once). An instance can be made static satisfying the call_once requirement. A version with and without return type is given.

struct run_invoke
{
   template<typename Fn, typename... Args>
   constexpr run_invoke (Fn&& func, Args&&... args) 
      { std::invoke(std::forward<Fn>(func), std::forward<Args>(args)...); }
   run_invoke() = delete;
   ~run_invoke() = default;
};
  
template<typename Fn, typename... Args>
class run_invoke_with_result
{
    const std::invoke_result_t<Fn, Args...> _result;
       
public:
   constexpr run_invoke_with_result (Fn&& func, Args&&... args) 
      : _result(std::invoke(std::forward<Fn>(func), std::forward<Args 
        (args)...)) {}
   run_invoke_with_result() = delete;
   ~run_invoke_with_result() = default;
        
   constexpr auto get_result() const { return _result; }
};

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