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I am writing a unit-test suite for a source code library that contains static_asserts. I want to provide assurance these static_asserts do no more and no less than they are desired to do, in design terms. So I would like to be able to test them.

I could of course add uncompilable unit tests of the interface that cause the static asserts to be violated by a comprehensive variety of means, and comment or #if 0 them all out, with my personal assurance to the user that if any of them are un-commented then they will observe that the library does not compile.

But that would be rather ridiculous. Instead, I would like to have some apparatus that would, in the context of the unit-test suite, replace a static_assert with an equivalently provoked runtime exception, that the test framework could catch and report in effect: This code would have static_asserted in a real build.

Am I overlooking some glaring reason why this would be a daft idea?

If not, how might it be done? Macro apparatus is an obvious approach and I don't rule it out. But maybe also, and preferably, with a template specialization or SFINAE approach?

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    My personal gut feeling is that static asserts should catch programming errors before you even run any tests. I don't see immediately a pressing reason why they should themselves be tested...
    – Kerrek SB
    Commented Jul 1, 2013 at 16:10
  • 2
    What Kerrek says. If your build environment doesn't take "tests did not build" as a failure, that's a problem.
    – Xeo
    Commented Jul 1, 2013 at 17:48
  • 1
    I don't see better than making a macro that output either static_assert or a runtime exception in test mode. In case of metaprogramming, it could make sens to test your compile assertions.
    – a.lasram
    Commented Jul 1, 2013 at 20:07
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    @KerrekSB, @Xeo This is template code. If, by design, certain generic forms of expression E0,..,En, should not compile, that can only be made systematically verifiable by writing some sort of regression tests that attempt to instantiate E0,..,En and which report failure to compile, for each Ei. A shim for "exceptionalizing" the static_asserts in test mode would be less imposingly onerous than, say, making the relevant test units into whole programs for trial with autoconf or the like. Does that make better sense? Commented Jul 1, 2013 at 21:54
  • @a.lasram Yes, metaprogramming is in the picture. But a macro that conditionally expands to a static assert or a throw is not an instant answer because you can't just put a throw in the same places as a static_assert. And would be desirable for the exception's what() to be the same as the static_assert's diagnostic. Commented Jul 1, 2013 at 22:02

1 Answer 1

14

As I seem to be a lone crank in my interest in this question I have cranked out an answer for myself, with a header file essentially like this:

exceptionalized_static_assert.h

#ifndef TEST__EXCEPTIONALIZE_STATIC_ASSERT_H
#define TEST__EXCEPTIONALIZE_STATIC_ASSERT_H

/* Conditionally compilable apparatus for replacing `static_assert`
    with a runtime exception of type `exceptionalized_static_assert`
    within (portions of) a test suite.
*/
#if TEST__EXCEPTIONALIZE_STATIC_ASSERT == 1

#include <string>
#include <stdexcept>

namespace test {

struct exceptionalized_static_assert : std::logic_error
{
    exceptionalized_static_assert(char const *what)
    : std::logic_error(what){};
    virtual ~exceptionalized_static_assert() noexcept {}
};

template<bool Cond>
struct exceptionalize_static_assert;

template<>
struct exceptionalize_static_assert<true>
{
    explicit exceptionalize_static_assert(char const * reason) {
        (void)reason;
    }
};


template<>
struct exceptionalize_static_assert<false>
{
    explicit exceptionalize_static_assert(char const * reason) {
        std::string s("static_assert would fail with reason: ");
        s += reason;
        throw exceptionalized_static_assert(s.c_str());
    }
};

} // namespace test

// A macro redefinition of `static_assert`
#define static_assert(cond,gripe) \
    struct _1_test \
    : test::exceptionalize_static_assert<cond> \
    {   _1_test() : \
        test::exceptionalize_static_assert<cond>(gripe){}; \
    }; \
    _1_test _2_test

#endif // TEST__EXCEPTIONALIZE_STATIC_ASSERT == 1

#endif // EOF

This header is for inclusion only in a test suite, and then it will make visible the macro redefinition of static_assert visible only when the test suite is built with

`-DTEST__EXCEPTIONALIZE_STATIC_ASSERT=1`    

The use of this apparatus can be sketched with a toy template library:

my_template.h

#ifndef MY_TEMPLATE_H
#define MY_TEMPLATE_H

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
struct my_template
{
    static_assert(std::is_pod<T>::value,"T must be POD in my_template<T>");

    explicit my_template(T const & t = T())
    : _t(t){}
    // ...
    template<int U>
    static int increase(int i) {
        static_assert(U != 0,"I cannot be 0 in my_template<T>::increase<I>");
        return i + U;
    }
    template<int U>
    static constexpr int decrease(int i) {
        static_assert(U != 0,"I cannot be 0 in my_template<T>::decrease<I>");
        return i - U;
    }
    // ...
    T _t;
    // ...  
};

#endif // EOF

Try to imagine that the code is sufficiently large and complex that you cannot at the drop of a hat just survey it and pick out the static_asserts and satisfy yourself that you know why they are there and that they fulfil their design purposes. You put your trust in regression testing.

Here then is a toy regression test suite for my_template.h:

test.cpp

#include "exceptionalized_static_assert.h"
#include "my_template.h"
#include <iostream>

template<typename T, int I>
struct a_test_template
{
    a_test_template(){};
    my_template<T> _specimen;
    //...
    bool pass = true;
};

template<typename T, int I>
struct another_test_template
{
    another_test_template(int i) {
        my_template<T> specimen;
        auto j = specimen.template increase<I>(i);
        //...
        (void)j;
    }
    bool pass = true;
};

template<typename T, int I>
struct yet_another_test_template
{
    yet_another_test_template(int i) {
        my_template<T> specimen;
        auto j = specimen.template decrease<I>(i);
        //...
        (void)j;
    }
    bool pass = true;
};

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    unsigned tests = 0;
    unsigned passes = 0;

    cout << "Test: " << ++tests << endl;    
    a_test_template<int,0> t0;
    passes += t0.pass;
    cout << "Test: " << ++tests << endl;    
    another_test_template<int,1> t1(1);
    passes += t1.pass;
    cout << "Test: " << ++tests << endl;    
    yet_another_test_template<int,1> t2(1);
    passes += t2.pass;
#if TEST__EXCEPTIONALIZE_STATIC_ASSERT == 1
    try {
        // Cannot instantiate my_template<T> with non-POD T
        using type = a_test_template<int,0>;
        cout << "Test: " << ++tests << endl;
        a_test_template<type,0> specimen;

    }
    catch(test::exceptionalized_static_assert const & esa) {
        ++passes;
        cout << esa.what() << endl;
    }
    try {
        // Cannot call my_template<T>::increase<I> with I == 0
        cout << "Test: " << ++tests << endl;
        another_test_template<int,0>(1);
    }
    catch(test::exceptionalized_static_assert const & esa) {
        ++passes;
        cout << esa.what() << endl;
    }
    try {
        // Cannot call my_template<T>::decrease<I> with I == 0
        cout << "Test: " << ++tests << endl;
        yet_another_test_template<int,0>(1);
    }
    catch(test::exceptionalized_static_assert const & esa) {
        ++passes;
        cout << esa.what() << endl;
    }
#endif // TEST__EXCEPTIONALIZE_STATIC_ASSERT == 1
    cout << "Passed " << passes << " out of " << tests << " tests" << endl;
    cout << (passes == tests ? "*** Success :)" : "*** Failure :(") << endl; 
    return 0;
}

// EOF

You can compile test.cpp with at least gcc 6.1, clang 3.8 and option -std=c++14, or VC++ 19.10.24631.0 and option /std:c++latest. Do so first without defining TEST__EXCEPTIONALIZE_STATIC_ASSERT (or defining it = 0). Then run and the the output should be:

Test: 1
Test: 2
Test: 3
Passed 3 out of 3 tests
*** Success :)

If you then repeat, but compile with -DTEST__EXCEPTIONALIZE_STATIC_ASSERT=1,

Test: 1
Test: 2
Test: 3
Test: 4
static_assert would fail with reason: T must be POD in my_template<T>
Test: 5
static_assert would fail with reason: I cannot be 0 in my_template<T>::increase<I>
Test: 6
static_assert would fail with reason: I cannot be 0 in my_template<T>::decrease<I>
Passed 6 out of 6 tests
*** Success :)

Clearly the repetitious coding of try/catch blocks in the static-assert test cases is tedious, but in the setting of a real and respectable unit-test framework one would expect it to package exception-testing apparatus to generate such stuff out of your sight. In googletest, for example, you are able to write the like of:

TYPED_TEST(t_my_template,insist_non_zero_increase)
{
    ASSERT_THROW(TypeParam::template increase<0>(1),
        exceptionalized_static_assert);
}

Now I can get back to my calculations of the date of Armageddon :)

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    // A macro redefinition of 'static_assert' ... ya, don't do that. Make a new token my_static_assert that maps to static_assert under standard, and my_strange_thing under your test engine. No need to abuse the language when you don't have to... Commented Jul 3, 2013 at 15:46
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    @Yakk The macro redefinition will only be visible in the test suite, because the header defining it is only to be included therein, and visible then only if the test suite is built with -DTEST__EXCEPTIONALIZE_STATIC_ASSERT=1. Updated the answer to make that clear. Commented Jul 3, 2013 at 21:50
  • @MikeKinghan Your macro redefinition does not work (with my version of STL), unfortunately, due to restrictions in macros when using template arguments, e.g. static_assert( std::is_same< T1, T2 >, "blabla" ). This code also happens to appear in the standard library. Didn't think of that one earlier, but it is a deal breaker for the solution that you suggested. As Yakk suggested, defining a new token is the way to go in this case. Btw, still a great solution. Commented Nov 18, 2013 at 14:19
  • There is one more issue with your approach, static_assert can be used to make sure a compiler error is given with a meaningful error message, some code may not compile even when static_assert is removed. Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 0:52
  • @MikeKinghan Check out this article as well: petriconi.net/?p=118 It doesn't test as many different kinds of things, but may be useful to extend your suite. Commented May 16, 2018 at 22:13

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