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I ran openssl speed on my Ubuntu computer. Some results:

Doing md4 for 3s on 16 size blocks: 9063888 md4's in 3.00s
Doing md4 for 3s on 64 size blocks: 7105157 md4's in 3.00s
Doing md4 for 3s on 256 size blocks: 4507884 md4's in 3.00s
Doing md4 for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 1809773 md4's in 2.99s
Doing md4 for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 275679 md4's in 3.00s

What exactly those numbers mean?

  1. what is 'Doing md4 for 3s' mean? does it mean do the whole test for 3 times/seconds?
  2. what does '1809773 md4's in 2.99s' mean?
  3. what does '8192 size blocks' mean?
The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
type             16 bytes     64 bytes    256 bytes   1024 bytes   8192 bytes
md4              47363.12k   151534.29k   382055.94k   615801.51k   747692.03k

And the above, last lines of openssl speed md4 output - what does they mean exactly?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

While it could probably be worded better, it pretty much means what it says - run the md4 hash routine in a loop for 3 seconds with a 16 byte input. After 3 seconds, observe that we ran just a bit over 9 million iterations. That's about 144 million bytes processed, or 48 million bytes per second (where "million" means 10^6).

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thank you! Could you be so kind and explain to me also openssl output (the last lines of output for a command: openssl speed md4? Here are those last lines: The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed. type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes md4 47363.12k 151534.29k 382055.94k 615801.51k 747692.03k I will add them also to my main question ;) – mazix Jul 6 '13 at 20:39
2  
For most of the hash and cipher algorithms, the throughput (how many bytes per second can be hashed/encrypted) depends on the block size you use as input - in other words hashing data 8KB at a time (747MB/s in your example) is faster than hashing it 16 bytes at a time (which comes in at only 47MB/s). That's what openssl speed does, is run each algorithm for a while with different block sizes to show you the throughput you can expect if you use it a certain way... – twalberg Jul 6 '13 at 22:48
    
@twalberg: so if I have an input buffer of length 1024 (char buf[1024];) and run for it MD5 from openssl its the same as blocks size in openssl speed? – yak Jul 15 '13 at 18:24
1  
If you process the entire buffer in one call, yes. – twalberg Jul 15 '13 at 18:28
2  
strlen(buf) will only count up to the first NULL byte in your buffer (assuming there is one - if there isn't you may be reading out of bounds), but if your intention is to hash a NULL-terminated string, that will handle the entire string in one pass... – twalberg Jul 15 '13 at 19:18

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