20

I actually never quite understood this behavior in hibernate. I am using a @OneToMany relationship in a Entity called 'Parent', which is annotated like this:

@OneToMany(cascade = {CascadeType.ALL, CascadeType.PERSIST, CascadeType.MERGE, CascadeType.REMOVE }, orphanRemoval = true)
@JoinColumn(name = "entity_id", insertable = true, updatable = true, nullable = false)
private List<Child> children;

Now I want to do the following within one transaction:

  • Get the parent entity
  • iterate through the list of children
  • delete one of the children
  • insert a new child

So, basically I am just entirely replacing one of the children.

As far as I understand this problem, I should be able to do something like this: (please note that this is just some java pseudocode to illustrate the problem)

@TransactionAttribute(TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRED)
public void deleteAndAdd(Long parentId, Long childId) {
  Parent parent = entityManager.find(parentId);
  for (Iterator it = parent.children.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
    Child child = it.next();
    if (child.id == childId) {
      it.remove();
    }
  }
  Child newChild = new Child();
  parent.children.add(newChild);
}

However, this fails in case the new Child has the same unique key values as the old one. So, basically it seems like the old child entity isn't removed properly, before the new one is persisted.

If I add a entityManager.flush() between deleting the old child and persisting the new child like this:

@TransactionAttribute(TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRED)
public void deleteAndAdd(Long parentId, Long childId) {
  Parent parent = entityManager.find(parentId);
  for (Iterator it = parent.children.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
    Child child = it.next();
    if (child.id == childId) {
      it.remove();
    }
  }
  entityManager.flush();
  Child newChild = new Child();
  parent.children.add(newChild);
}

Everything works fine. The child is deleted before the new one is inserted, as it should.

As I don't want to asume that hibernate mixes up the order of the statements that are sent to the DB, there must be something else I am assuming about hibernate which isn't the case. Any ideas why the latter example works, while the first one doesn't?

Hibernate version is 3.5. DB is Mysql InnoDB

  • However, this fails in case the new Child has the same unique key values as the old one.: are you saying that the primary key for the child is the same as that of already exiting? – zerocool Jul 1 '13 at 18:12
  • Actually no. For instance there is a compound unique key on the Child, which consists of the 'entity_id' FK and another value of the entity like for instance a 'name'. If I remove the child with the name 'child1' and add a new one with the same name 'child1', I am observing described behavior. The FK for both children will obviously be the same, as well as the name, that I have set to the same value. However, if the old one would be removed before persisting the new one, this should work fine. – Steve Hummingbird Jul 1 '13 at 18:16
  • 1
    Rather than deleting the child, why don't you update it with the data of the new one if both have the same primary key? – Eduardo Sanchez-Ros Jul 1 '13 at 18:28
  • Looks to me like the flush mode is not auto, can you set the flush mode to auto? Also when you say it does not work, what is happening? any exceptions ? – zerocool Jul 1 '13 at 18:54
  • @spaniard Valid point. But that unfortunately does not explain the behavior I am encountering. And the PK necessarily isn't the same, but I agree that in most cases it still is possible to update instead of deleting and inserting new objects when needed. However, if we would take that discussion further, the issue usually starts at the specs for the interface. – Steve Hummingbird Jul 1 '13 at 20:19
23

Hibernate doesn't know about, nor respect, all database constraints (e.g. MySQL unique constraints). It's a known issue they don't plan on addressing anytime soon.

Hibernate has a defined order for the way operations occur during a flush.

Entity deletions will always happen after inserts. The only answers I know about are to remove the constraint or add the additional flush.

EDIT: By the way, the reason for the defined order is that this is the only way to guarantee foreign key constraints (one of the constraints they DO care about) aren't violated, even if the user does something out of order.

  • I would asume, I was working with 'collection elements'? At least Child is in a collection in Parent, which is where I am calling the entityManager on. In that case the documentation is specifying delete before insert. That's somewhat confusing to me now. – Steve Hummingbird Jul 1 '13 at 20:14
  • I believe the "collection" elements refer to join tables for many-to-many associations. – Pace Jul 1 '13 at 22:01
  • I finally found something: docs.jboss.org/hibernate/orm/3.3/reference/en/html/… "Collections can contain almost any other Hibernate type, including: basic types, custom types, components and references to other entities. This is an important distinction. An object in a collection might be handled with "value" semantics (its life cycle fully depends on the collection owner), or it might be a reference to another entity with its own life cycle. In the latter case, only the "link" between the two objects is considered to be a state held by the collection." – Steve Hummingbird Jul 2 '13 at 8:39
  • So, probably in this case the "collection element" only manages the foreign key field of the entity. In that case this would actually make sense. – Steve Hummingbird Jul 2 '13 at 8:42
15

For the sake of future readers, one way to resolve this issue is to use deferred constraints. PostgreSQL and Oracle support them, maybe other RDBMS' too. Hibernate will issue all statements within a transaction, and deferral will ensure that constraints are enforced upon transaction commit only. In PostgreSQL, for example:

ALTER TABLE company
    ADD CONSTRAINT name_unique UNIQUE (name) DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED;

It is not ideal, but it is simple and effective.

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