11

I want to give maybe a million password to some users that should be like:

  1. It must have at least 6 characters
  2. It must have digits and also letters

Should I use Random here? How?

  • 1
    I saw an interesting solution to the "random" problem when I signed up for my RIM signature codes. They make you move the mouse a whole ton to generate trully random data, as opposed to having dedicated hardware to do the same thing. – San Jacinto Nov 16 '09 at 13:34
  • Is being random a requirement? If not then just iterate over 000000 to 999999 and AA-ZZ. – Steve Kuo Nov 16 '09 at 20:15

10 Answers 10

34

RandomStringUtils from Apache Commons Lang provide some methods to generate a randomized String, that can be used as password.


Here are some examples of 8-characters passwords creation:

// Passwords with only alphabetic characters.
for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
    System.out.println(RandomStringUtils.randomAlphabetic(8));
}
System.out.println("--------");
// Passwords with alphabetic and numeric characters.
for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
    System.out.println(RandomStringUtils.randomAlphanumeric(8));
}

which creates the following result:

zXHzaLdG
oDtlFDdf
bqPbXVfq
tzQUWuxU
qBHBRKQP
uBLwSvnt
gzBcTnIm
yTUgXlCc
--------
khDzEFD2
cHz1p6yJ
3loXcBau
F6NJAQr7
PyfN079I
8tJye7bu
phfwpY6y
62q27YRt

Of course, you have also methods that may restrict the set of characters allowed for the password generation:

for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
    System.out.println(RandomStringUtils.random(8, "abcDEF123"));
}

will create only passwords with the characters a, b, c, D, E, F, 1, 2 or 3:

D13DD1Eb
cac1Dac2
FE1bD2DE
2ab3Fb3D
213cFEFD
3c2FEDDF
FDbFcc1E
b2cD1c11
  • +1 the randomAlphabetic and randomAlphaNumeric are good for this, unless you want truly cryptographically random passwords. – skaffman Nov 16 '09 at 10:22
  • 2
    The link is broken – Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 31 '11 at 23:56
  • 3
    RandomStringUtils is not well suited for password generation as it is based on standard Random, but not on SecureRandom – isaranchuk Nov 18 '15 at 15:23
  • 1
    Unless you manually specify secure random generator, see RandomStringUtils.random – isaranchuk Nov 18 '15 at 15:34
  • 1
    This answer is a bit dangerous, since java.util.Random is being used by default (which is stated by others). java.util.Random is cracked, so if this is used for generating new passwords/tokens for password reset, there is a chance that an attacker might predict the next password/token and start stealing accounts. -1 due to this. – Tobb May 26 '16 at 12:00
24

When using Apache's RandomStringUtils for security reasons (i.e. passwords), it's very important to combine the use of a SecureRandom source:

RandomStringUtils.random(6, 0, 0, true, true, null, new SecureRandom());
10

Use SecureRandom, it provides a more random passwords.

You can create a single password using something like this (note: untested code).

// put here all characters that are allowed in password
char[] allowedCharacters = {'a','b','c','1','2','3','4'};

SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom();
StringBuffer password = new StringBuffer();

for(int i = 0; i < PASSWORD_LENGTH; i++) {
    password.append(allowedCharacters[ random.nextInt(allowedCharacters.length) ]);
}

Note that this does not guarantee that the every password will have both digits and characters.

  • SecureRandom returns numbers, but she asked for numbers and letters. – Sylar Nov 16 '09 at 10:04
  • This code is referencing a character array by the returned integer value, so it does indeed return characters and numbers! – badbod99 Nov 16 '09 at 10:07
  • Yes, now, but before the edit it did not. – Sylar Nov 16 '09 at 10:11
  • 2
    can't stop to giggle whenever i read s.th. like "more random" :-} – mhaller Nov 16 '09 at 21:03
5

Here's one that I wrote a while back:

package com.stackoverflow.does.my.code.for.me;

import java.io.UnsupportedEncodingException;
import java.security.MessageDigest;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.SecureRandom;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class PasswordUtil {

    /** Minimum password length = 6 */
    public static final int MIN_PASSWORD_LENGTH = 6;
    /** Maximum password length = 8 */
    public static final int MAX_PASSWORD_LENGTH = 8;

    /** Uppercase characters A-Z */
    public static final char[] UPPERS = new char[26];
    /** Lowercase characters a-z */
    public static final char[] LOWERS = new char[26];
    /**
     * Printable non-alphanumeric characters, excluding space.
     */
    public static final char[] SPECIALS = new char[32];
    public static final char[] DIGITS = new char[] { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

    static {
        // Static initializer block for populating arrays
        int U = 'A';
        int l = 'a';
        int d = '0';
        for (int i = 0; i < 26; i++) {
            UPPERS[i] = (char) (U + i);
            LOWERS[i] = (char) (l + i);
            if (i < 10) {
                DIGITS[i] = (char) (d + i);
            }
        }
        int p = 0;
        for (int s = 33; s < 127; s++) {
            char specialChar = (char) 32;

            if (s >= 'a' && s <= 'z')
                s = 'z' + 1; // jump over 'a' to 'z'
            else if (s >= 'A' && s <= 'Z')
                s = 'Z' + 1; // jump over 'A' to 'Z'
            else if (s >= '0' && s <= '9')
                s = '9' + 1; // jump over '0' to '9'

            specialChar = (char) s;
            SPECIALS[p] = specialChar;
            p++;
        }
    }

    public String generatePassword() {
        List<char[]> activeSets = new ArrayList<char[]>(4);
        List<char[]> inactiveSets = new ArrayList<char[]>(4);

        activeSets.add(UPPERS);
        activeSets.add(LOWERS);
        activeSets.add(SPECIALS);
        activeSets.add(DIGITS);

        SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom();

        int passwordLength = 5 + random.nextInt(3);
        StringBuffer password = new StringBuffer(passwordLength + 1);

        for (int p = 0; p <= passwordLength; p++) {
            char[] randomSet = null;
            if (activeSets.size() > 1) {
                int rSet = random.nextInt(activeSets.size());
                randomSet = activeSets.get(rSet);
                inactiveSets.add(randomSet);
                activeSets.remove(rSet);
            } else {
                randomSet = activeSets.get(0);
                inactiveSets.add(randomSet);
                activeSets.clear();
                activeSets.addAll(inactiveSets);
                inactiveSets.clear();
            }
            int rChar = random.nextInt(randomSet.length);
            char randomChar = randomSet[rChar];
            password.append(randomChar);
        }

        return password.toString();
    }
}
3

This is also a nice one:

String password = Integer.toString((int) (Math.random() * Integer.MAX_VALUE), 36);

It however does not guarantee that the password always contains both digits and letters, but most of the aforementioned suggestions also doesn't do that.

1

What I would do is something like this:

  1. Create two arrays, one with the allowed letters and other with the allowed digits.
  2. Use Random to decide the length of the password.
  3. Use Random to decide whether the next character is a letter or a digit.
  4. Use Random once more to generate an index for the array of letters or digits (depending on wht you obtained in step 3). Append the obtained character to the password.
  5. Repeat from 3 until you have the amount of characters obtained in 2.
  • this doesn't guarantee digits and letters in the password – jk. Nov 16 '09 at 10:08
  • @jk: You are right. Then the password should be checked at the end of the process, and if it contains only letters or only digits, it can be either discarded and and the process started over, or a few characters of the missing group could be added manually. Anyway this should happen rarely. – Konamiman Nov 16 '09 at 10:24
0

This will be the easiest one :)

String char_group = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
String digit_group = "123456789";

// first choose a len of pwd
Random ran = new Random();
int pwd_len = ran.nextInt(50); //50 is the max length of password,say
// check that pwd_len is not less than 6
// do the check here

// finally create the password..
StringBuffer pwd = new StringBuffer();
Random RNG = new Random();
for (int i = 0; i < pwd_len ; i++) {
    int randomNum = RNG.nextInt(100);
    char c = '';
    // Here 25% is the ratio of mixing digits
    // in the password, you can change 4 to any
    // other value to change the depth of mix
    // or you can even make it random. 
    if (randomNum % 4 == 0) {
        c = digit_group[randomNum  % digit_group.length];
    } else {
        c = char_group[randomNum  % char_group.length];
    }
    pwd.append(c);
}
return pwd.toString();
  • 4
    This initializes random number generator inside loop, using current time. The password will not be very random. Also generated password may contain unprintable characters. – Juha Syrjälä Nov 16 '09 at 10:05
  • @juha...thats definitely right, maybe i was half asleep while asnwering this...i will update the answer :) – Suraj Chandran Nov 16 '09 at 13:13
  • HEY GUYS....i HAVE UPDATED MY ANSWER...PLEASE TAKE BACK YOUR DOWN VOTES :) – Suraj Chandran Nov 16 '09 at 13:28
  • You are using the same random number to decide whether to use digits and characters and as a index to digit_group/char_group arrays. That is bit suspect. Also you should use much larger parameter to second RND.nextInt() call, something like MAX_INT, otherwise distribution of passwords may be skewed. – Juha Syrjälä Nov 17 '09 at 6:38
0

A bit late, but I usually use the following code:

private static final int PASSWORD_SIZE = 16;
private static final String VALID_SPECIAL_CHARACTERS = "!@#$%&*()_-+=[]{}\\|:/?.,><"; // Note the double \ as escape

private static String createPassword() {
    SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom();
    StringBuilder password = new StringBuilder();
    while (password.length() < PASSWORD_SIZE) {
        char character = (char) random.nextInt(Character.MAX_VALUE);
        if ((character >= 'a' && character <= 'z') || (character >= 'A' && character <= 'Z') || (character >= '0' && character <= '9') || VALID_SPECIAL_CHARACTERS.contains(String.valueOf(character))) {
            password.append(character);
        }
    }
    return password.toString();
}

There is no guarantee that there will always be a number, special character, lower-case and upper-case character in the password. This could be enforced by first adding a character and a digit, however this would create passwords that are a bit more predictable.

0

Here is how you can make sure your generated password meets your password criteria, e.g: in your case, i would use this regex:

<code>String regex = "^(?=[a-zA-Z0-9ñÑ]*\d)(?=[a-zA-Z0-9ñÑ]*[a-z])(?=[a-zA-Z0-9ñÑ]*[A-Z])[a-zA-Z0-9ñÑ]{6,}$"</code>

This regex meets the following criteria:

1.- at least 1 lowerCase letter

2.- at least 1 upperCase letter

3.- at least 1 digit(number)

4.- at least 6 characters (note that adding a number greater than 6 after the comma at the end of the regex, will now meet a criteria that at least 6 characters and a max of whatever you put in there)

<code>char[] char = {'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h',...};

SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom();
StringBuffer password = new StringBuffer();</code>

while(!password.toString().matches("your regex")){
    for(int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
    password.append(char [ random.nextInt(char .length) ]);
    }
}
System.out.println(password.toString());

What this code does is that whileyour generated password doesn't meet your criteria, it will loop the for loop over and over.

0

Implemented a PasswordBuilder. Supports passwrod limit, must have characters and how much of them, char ranges and a list of them.

Usage Example:

System.out.println(new PasswordBuilder().addCharsOption("!@#$%&*()_-+=[]{}\\|:/?.,><", 1).addRangeOption('A', 'Z', 1).addRangeOption('a', 'z', 0).addRangeOption('0', '9', 1).build());

Example result: QU1GY7p+j+-PUW+_

System.out.println(new PasswordBuilder().addCharsOption("!@#$%&*()_-+=[]{}\\|:/?.,><", 1).addRangeOption('A', 'Z', 1).addRangeOption('a', 'z', 0).addRangeOption('0', '9', 1).setSize(5).build());

Example result: %,4NX

Implementation:

//Version=1.0
//Source=https://www.dropbox.com/s/3a4uyrd2kcqdo28/PasswordBuilder.java?dl=0
//Dependencies=java:7 com.google.guava:guava:18.0 commons-lang:commons-lang:2.6

import com.google.common.primitives.Chars;
import org.apache.commons.lang.ArrayUtils;

import java.security.SecureRandom;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

/**
 * Created by alik on 5/26/16.
 */
public class PasswordBuilder {
    private int size = 16;
    private List<Character> options = new ArrayList<>();
    private Map<List<Character>, Integer> musts = new java.util.LinkedHashMap<>();
    private SecureRandom secureRandom = new SecureRandom();

    public PasswordBuilder() {
    }

    public PasswordBuilder setSize(int size) {
        this.size = size;
        return this;
    }

    public PasswordBuilder addRangeOption(char from, char to, int mustCount) {
        List<Character> option = new ArrayList<>(to - from + 1);
        for (char i = from; i < to; ++i) {
            option.add(i);
        }
        return addOption(option, mustCount);
    }

    public PasswordBuilder addCharsOption(String chars, int mustCount) {
            return addOption(Chars.asList(chars.toCharArray()), mustCount);
    }

    public PasswordBuilder addOption(List<Character> option, int mustCount) {
        this.options.addAll(option);
        musts.put(option, mustCount);
        return this;

    }

    public String build() {
        validateMustsNotOverflowsSize();
        Character[] password = new Character[size];

        // Generate random from musts
        for (Map.Entry<List<Character>, Integer> entry : musts.entrySet()) {
            for (int i = 0; i < entry.getValue(); i++) {
                int charIndex = secureRandom.nextInt(entry.getKey().size());
                char c = entry.getKey().get(charIndex);
                addChar(password, c);
            }
        }

        // Generate from overall
        for (int i = 0; i < password.length; i++) {
            if (password[i] != null) continue;
            password[i] = options.get(secureRandom.nextInt(options.size()));
        }
        return new String(ArrayUtils.toPrimitive(password));
    }

    private void addChar(Character[] password, char c) {
        int i;
        for (i = secureRandom.nextInt(password.length); password[i] != null; i = secureRandom.nextInt(password.length)) {
        }
        password[i] = c;
    }

    private void validateMustsNotOverflowsSize() {
        int overallMusts = 0;
        for (Integer mustCount : musts.values()) {
            overallMusts += mustCount;
        }
        if (overallMusts > size) {
            throw new RuntimeException("Overall musts exceeds the requested size of the password.");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(new PasswordBuilder().addCharsOption("!@#$%&*()_-+=[]{}\\|:/?.,><", 1).addRangeOption('A', 'Z', 1).addRangeOption('a', 'z', 0).addRangeOption('0', '9', 1).build());
        System.out.println(new PasswordBuilder().addCharsOption("!@#$%&*()_-+=[]{}\\|:/?.,><", 1).addRangeOption('A', 'Z', 1).addRangeOption('a', 'z', 0).addRangeOption('0', '9', 1).setSize(5).build());
    }
}

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