2

In the following example:

Worker thread adds something to a vector:

std::lock_guard<std::mutex> guard(UI::GetInstance().my_mutex);

UI::GetInstance().my_vector.push_back(new_value);

UI Thread checks the list:

while (true) {
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> guard(my_mutex);

    //perform my_vector operations and clear at the end
    my_vector.clear();
}

I don't like lock guarding every iteration, is there a better approach to this? I was hoping to set some sort a flag like so, but I am not sure if bools are thread safe:

Worker thread adds something to a vector:

std::lock_guard<std::mutex> guard(UI::GetInstance().my_mutex);

UI::GetInstance().my_vector.push_back(new_value);
UI::GetInstance().my_vector_changed=true; // set a flag

UI Thread checks the list:

while (true) {
    if (my_vector_changed) { // only lock on changes
        std::lock_guard<std::mutex> guard(my_mutex);
        //perform my_vector operations and clear at the end
        UI::GetInstance().my_vector.clear();
        my_vector_changed=false;
    }
}

Is there a better approach to lock guards?

  • 2
    Use a threadsafe blocking queue instead of a busy loop – David Heffernan Jul 1 '13 at 20:04
6

This kind of "someone did something interesting to data protected by that mutex" notification is what condition variables are for -- use a condition_variable instead.

Re your technique: That's kind of like rolling your own cv, but if you do that be sure to make bool be atomic<bool> or atomic_flag since access to it needs to be synchronized, and wait sometimes instead of spinning (constantly polling).

  • Thanks. Is there a big performance hit with atomic<bool> vs bool? – Grapes Jul 1 '13 at 21:35
  • 6
    @Grapes: If there is (on any given implementation), then it's because using bool doesn't work. It's generally a good idea to resist getting very excited about fast code that's broken ;-) – Steve Jessop Jul 1 '13 at 22:38
  • 1
    Not a big performance hit, but you don't have a choice. If you don't use atomic operations your code might not produce the results you want. I'd rather wait to have the right answer than get wrong answers very quickly. – DanielKO Jul 1 '13 at 22:38

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