43

I have a function inside one of my angular services that I'd like to be called repeatedly at a regular interval. I'd like to do this using $timeout. It looks something like this:

var interval = 1000; // Or something

var _tick = function () {
     $timeout(function () {
        doStuff();
        _tick();
    }, interval);
};

_tick();

I'm stumped on how to unit test this with Jasmine at the moment - How do I do this? If I use $timeout.flush() then the function calls occur indefinitely. If I use Jasmine's mock clock, $timeout seems to be unaffected. Basically if I can get this working, I should be good to go:

describe("ANGULAR Manually ticking the Jasmine Mock Clock", function() {
    var timerCallback, $timeout;

    beforeEach(inject(function($injector) {
        $timeout = $injector.get('$timeout');
        timerCallback = jasmine.createSpy('timerCallback');
        jasmine.Clock.useMock();
    }));

    it("causes a timeout to be called synchronously", function() {
        $timeout(function() {
            timerCallback();
        }, 100);
        expect(timerCallback).not.toHaveBeenCalled();
        jasmine.Clock.tick(101);
        expect(timerCallback).toHaveBeenCalled();
    });
});

These two variations work, but do not help me:

describe("Manually ticking the Jasmine Mock Clock", function() {
    var timerCallback;

    beforeEach(function() {
        timerCallback = jasmine.createSpy('timerCallback');
        jasmine.Clock.useMock();
    });

    it("causes a timeout to be called synchronously", function() {
        setTimeout(function() {
            timerCallback();
        }, 100);
        expect(timerCallback).not.toHaveBeenCalled();
        jasmine.Clock.tick(101);
        expect(timerCallback).toHaveBeenCalled();
    });
});

describe("ANGULAR Manually flushing $timeout", function() {
    var timerCallback, $timeout;

    beforeEach(inject(function($injector) {
        $timeout = $injector.get('$timeout');
        timerCallback = jasmine.createSpy('timerCallback');
    }));

    it("causes a timeout to be called synchronously", function() {
        $timeout(function() {
            timerCallback();
        }, 100);
        expect(timerCallback).not.toHaveBeenCalled();
        $timeout.flush();
        expect(timerCallback).toHaveBeenCalled();
    });
});

Thanks in advance!

  • Try injecting $rootScope and calling $rootScope.$apply() after pushing the clock forward. – Hector Virgen Aug 12 '13 at 19:17
52

Do not make your test Async by using Jasmine's clock. Instead, use $timeout.flush() to synchronously maintain the flow of the test. It may be a bit tricky to setup, but once you get it then your tests will be faster and more controlled.

Here's an example of a test that does it using this approach: https://github.com/angular/angular.js/blob/master/test/ngAnimate/animateSpec.js#L618

|improve this answer|||||
  • Your answer solves the problem, as well as reiterates an important rule of thumb: Unit tests should always be synchronous – ethanfar Oct 1 '15 at 5:38
45

@matsko's answer led me down the right path. I thought I'd post my "complete" solution to make it simpler to find the answer.

The thing to test

angular.module("app").service("MyService", function() {
    return {
        methodThatHasTimeoutAndReturnsAPromise: function($q, $timeout) {
            var deferred = $q.defer();
            $timeout(function() {
                deferred.resolve(5);
            }, 2000);
            return deferred.promise;
        }
    };
});

The test

describe("MyService", function() {
    var target,
        $timeout;
    beforeEach(inject(function(_$timeout_, MyService) {
        $timeout = _$timeout_;
        target = MyService;
    }));
    beforeEach(function(done) {
        done();
    });
    it("equals 5", function(done) {
        target.methodThatHasTimeoutAndReturnsAPromise().then(function(value) {
            expect(value).toBe(5);
            done();
        });
        $timeout.flush();
    });
});
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    Isn't the done() in the "equals 5" test redundant? $timeout.flush() will synchronously call all of the pending events registered in $timeout, which will cause the promise to resolve, which will immediately call expect(). – Avi Cherry Aug 6 '15 at 19:43
  • I'm not entirely sure. Might be worth a test, though. – Beez Aug 10 '15 at 20:15
  • 2
    @AviCherry Without the done callback parameter, the code will trigger the flush but then immediately consider the test passed, because it does not know that an asynchronous call was triggered. With done , you make sure that the test will not be completed until done is called. An expect will not finish a test. You can have multiple expectations in a test. Also, if you provide the done callback but you never execute it, your test will fail because Jasmine will throw something like execution took too long, because the test will never be completed. Can't remember the exact feedback. – Justus Romijn Sep 8 '15 at 8:20
  • Ah, yes. That's right. So, pay attention to the beforeEach function which calls done() first. That's the key that tells Jasmine an async call is coming. So when $timeout.flush() is called, it's pending until the done() is called after you're finished expect-ing. Good note @Justus! – Beez Sep 8 '15 at 14:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.