27

I'm using git bash for Windows:

$ git version
git version 1.8.0.msysgit.0

Everything has been working fine for months, I've been gradually getting used to how git works, then all of a sudden, git pull is retrieving a number of "new" branches each time I try to pull:

me@MYPC /d/Projects/MyProject (master)
$ git pull
From github.com:ClientUsername/RepoName
 * [new branch]      branch1 -> origin/branch1
 * [new branch]      branch2 -> origin/branch2
Already up-to-date.

me@MYPC /d/Projects/MyProject (master)
$ git pull
From github.com:ClientUsername/RepoName
 * [new branch]      branch1 -> origin/branch1
 * [new branch]      branch2 -> origin/branch2
Already up-to-date.

Have I configured something incorrectly? Is this normal behavior?


EDIT

After some helpful comments, I deleted the branch files from .git\refs\remotes\origin. I tried to pull again and got the following:

me@MyPC /d/Projects/MyProject (master)
$ git pull
From github.com:ClientUsername/RepoName
 * [new branch]      Branch1 -> origin/Branch1
 * [new branch]      Branch2 -> origin/Branch2
 * [new branch]      branch1 -> origin/branch1
 * [new branch]      branch2 -> origin/branch2
Already up-to-date.
me@MyPC /d/Projects/MyProject (master)
$ git pull
From github.com:ClientUsername/RepoName
 * [new branch]      Branch1 -> origin/Branch1
 * [new branch]      Branch2 -> origin/Branch2
Already up-to-date.

The only difference being the case of the branch names?

  • strange indeed. After the pull are those branches listed? Are they present under .git/refs/remotes/origin? – Balog Pal Jul 2 '13 at 12:36
  • 2
    git branch -r. I'd delete .git/refs/remotes/origin/branch1 and 2 as first attempt – Balog Pal Jul 2 '13 at 12:41
  • 3
    seem like you're hit by case insensitive filenames issue? or special characters in branch name – Balog Pal Jul 2 '13 at 12:51
  • 1
    one more idea: look in .git/packed_refs and if the entry present for your branches delete those too – Balog Pal Jul 2 '13 at 12:54
  • 2
    Same issue here on osx, one branch was pushed to repository and later merged with master but every time I run git pull on master it keeps saying Already up-to-date but also says [new branch] branchname -> origin/branchname – Saba Ahang Mar 31 '16 at 17:10
18

In my case, the issue was related to two branches having the same name (one uppercase, one lower case). Once I removed the "duplicate" branch from remote origin, I ran the following:

git fetch --prune origin

and the [new branch] message stop showing after every pull. For documentation on prune see reference.

  • 1
    thank you, this has been an annoyance for quite a while and this resolved it. – gkelly Aug 28 '19 at 13:51
  • Thanks this worked like a charm. Per documentation --prune: "Before fetching, remove any remote-tracking references that no longer exist on the remote." not only it removed remote-tracking references that no longer exist on the remote but also fixed uppercase lowercase name mismatch. – yantaq Sep 5 '19 at 22:47
10

I could reproduce the behavior by having a branch not listed in .git/packed_refs and renaming its file in .git/refs/remotes/origin to the same but different case. (on NTFS filesystem). And it is cured by renaming back.

Guess if you could rename to the form that matches the remote name, it would be a fix for you.

Thinking more, and using the first form after edit:

You must have two branches with similar name just differing in case on remote!

And the problem is because they want to create the same file. You must fix it on the remote, by renaming one of the similar-named branches.

  • Well, I've tried all your suggestions, but it's still happening. It's almost as if my local repo is set up to pull the same branch twice. I'm going to re-clone. – Spikeh Jul 2 '13 at 13:14
  • Cloning in another location has solved the problem. However, github is also listing both repos separately, but all the hashes are the same. I think we'll try renaming next... if that doesn't work, we need to speak to gihub I think! – Spikeh Jul 2 '13 at 13:33
6

As you can see here:

* [new branch]      Branch1 -> origin/Branch1
* [new branch]      Branch2 -> origin/Branch2
* [new branch]      branch1 -> origin/branch1
* [new branch]      branch2 -> origin/branch2

You have 4 branches and pairs of them have the same name with different upper/lowercase. This can’t be mirrored on Windows since branches are stored as files and you can not have two files Branch1 and branch1 in the same folder.

To fix that, remove one of these, by running git push origin :Branch1 and the same for Branch2.

4

Had a similar issue, problem was with an existing local folder not matching the name in the remote server due to case-sensitive differences. What worked for me was going to

.git/refs/remotes/origin

where you can find the affected branch folder name and either rename it to the name suggested in the *[new branch] line OR delete it and pull again, the pull will re-create the folder in the correct filesystem case.

Although from your last edit it looks like in the remote server you have both folders (ie Branch1 and branch1) so I will double check which one is the correct folder and delete the remote wrong one, then make sure the folder name is matching the one in your local.

1

I'm also running git for Windows (version 2.20.0.windows.1), and had the same issue but managed to solve it with help from other answers in this thread.

In my case a new branch was added by a team member under a path that differed by case to already existing branches.

The following branches existed:

feature/branch-1
feature/branch-2

Then a new branch got created:

Feature/branch-3

Note all branches have unique names; but the case differs on the word feature.

Upon git pull I got a notification about a new branch; which created a branch-3 file for the under .git\refs\remotes\origin\feature. The order of branch creation probably matters here; because .git\refs\remotes\origin\feature existed prior to .git\refs\remotes\origin\Feature; my path was lowercase. Reversing the order of branch creation would probably result in a capital Feature path.

Every subsequent git pull would report this new branch.

The problem was that even though the file for the branch existed; the branch was not added to .git\packed-refs. The fix was to manually add a line for the problem branch with correct casing:

# pack-refs with: peeled fully-peeled sorted 
...
<hash> refs/remotes/origin/feature/branch-1
<hash> refs/remotes/origin/feature/branch-2
<hash> refs/remotes/origin/Feature/branch-3
...

Where the <hash> was taken from the .git\refs\remotes\origin\feature\branch-3 file.

Also; speculating on the original question. Let's just say I had the following branches:

feature/branch-1
feature/Branch-1

Windows would write the hash for both branches into the single path .git\refs\remotes\origin\feature\branch-1 (or capital B depending on branch creation order). I don't know what the implications of that are if you tried to git checkout both branches.

I am also betting that there's only a single entry in .git\packed-refs for both the branches. Perhaps adding entries for both branches would help to get rid of the new branch message reported by git pull but as mentioned above, git checkout feature/branch-1 followed by git checkout feature/Branch-1 might be interesting.

Hope this is useful to someone else!

0

(Thanks to Paul, above. Unlike Paul, I run git locally on Cygwin on Windows. The git remote is a Linux server.)

I kept getting this error with git advising about 'someBranchName' every time I did a git pull:

$ git pull
From <server>:<path>
 * [new branch]        someBranchName -> origin/someBranchName
Already up to date

There were two branches with differences in case:

$ git branch -a | grep -i SomeBranchName
  remotes/origin/someBranchName
  remotes/origin/SomeBranchName

What worked for me was to edit .git/refs/remotes/origin/someBranchName (this file existed in my local repo) and get its hash. Then edit .git/packed-refs and add a second entry with the same hash for both branches:

012345ae refs/remotes/origin/someBranchName
012345ae refs/remotes/origin/SomeBranchName
  • Glad I could help! For anyone reading in future - I am on Windows (I think the commonality between @happyblue and me is that the NTFS filesystem is not case sensitive for resolving file names) but using Git for Windows - and I primarily use git bash. The remote is Azure DevOps so I can't really speculate on the remote OS. – Paul Dec 16 '19 at 1:49
-1

What worked for me is simply:

rm .git/index
git reset
  • 5
    Would have to explain what you're doing here and whether there are side effects – PandaWood Mar 7 '18 at 5:56

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