51

I am learning C programming language, I have just started learning arrays with pointers. I have problem in this question, I hope the that output must be 5 but it is 2, Can anyone please explain why?

int main(){
   int arr[] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
   char *ptr = (char *) arr;
   printf("%d", *(ptr+4));
   return 0;
}
10
  • 12
    If anyone votes down this question then please mention your comment, it is very tough for me, hopefully not for others.... :) Jul 2, 2013 at 11:07
  • 12
    You have an "int" array, but a "char" pointer.
    – Lucas
    Jul 2, 2013 at 11:10
  • 7
    +1 on your announcement :)
    – Dayal rai
    Jul 2, 2013 at 11:10
  • 11
    By the way, you would have expected your output to be 5, not 4: *ptr points to the first element of the array, which is 1, four elements after it you have 5. 5 would have been the output if you had defined int *ptr = (int *) arr;
    – Antonio
    Jul 2, 2013 at 12:34
  • 1
    I would suggest changing the topic of this question to something more useful. This question may get asked in the future. I'd suggest My char pointer points to ivalid value after being cast from int*" or sth like that. I'd edit the question, but there's too many upvotes and I don't want to mess with such a popular qustion.
    – Dariusz
    Jul 3, 2013 at 7:58

7 Answers 7

81

Assumed a little endian architecture where an int is 32 bits (4 bytes), the individual bytes of int arr[] look like this (least significant byte at the lower address. All values in hex):

|01 00 00 00|02 00 00 00|03 00 00 00|04 00 00 00|05 00 00 00
char *ptr = (char *) arr;

Now, ptr points to the first byte - since you have casted to char*, it is treated as char array onwards:

|1|0|0|0|2|0|0|0|3|0|0|0|4|0|0|0|5|0|0|0
 ^
 +-- ptr

Then, *(ptr+4) accesses the fifth element of the char array and returns the corresponding char value:

|1|0|0|0|2|0|0|0|3|0|0|0|4|0|0|0|5|0|0|0
         ^
         +-- *(ptr + 4) = 2

Hence, printf() prints 2.

On a Big Endian system, the order of the bytes within each int is reversed, resulting in

|0|0|0|1|0|0|0|2|0|0|0|3|0|0|0|4|0|0|0|5
         ^
         +-- *(ptr + 4) = 0
2
  • 3
    You mix your endianess, little endian have the lowest by in the lowest memory location. Jul 2, 2013 at 11:34
  • 3
    Your description of how printf() handles this case is incorrect. It's getting the value of the 5th character as an integer, not a pointer to same. Also, as Joachim says, your endianness is flipped.
    – Hasturkun
    Jul 2, 2013 at 11:44
13

It's because the size of char is one, and the size of int is four. This means that adding 4 to ptr makes the result point to the second entry in the int array.

If you compiled this on a big endian system you would have printed 33554432 instead.

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  • 1
    I thought that endian only applied to floating point. Are you suggesting that integers behave in the same way? I'm not so sure.
    – Bathsheba
    Jul 2, 2013 at 11:15
  • 5
    Wherever there is a type that uses more than 1 byte there is a question of what order to store the bytes in.
    – Joe
    Jul 2, 2013 at 11:16
  • 9
    @Bathsheba Endianess is definitely an integer problem. Jul 2, 2013 at 11:17
  • 2
    @JoachimPileborg +1 - I remember that I always mess them up :D Jul 2, 2013 at 12:02
  • 3
    ... and, I think that you were right in the first place: On big endian, the result should be zero, since you are accessing the fifth byte as char and this byte is zero... sorry for that ... Jul 2, 2013 at 12:18
3
int main(){
 int arr[] = {1,2,3,4,5};
 char *ptr = (char *) arr;
 printf("%d",*(ptr+4));
 return 0;
}

Each case of arr has sizeof(int) size (which may be 4 on your implementation).

Since ptr is a pointer to char, pointer arithmetic makes ptr + 4 points 4 bytes after &arr[0], which may be &arr[1].

In memory, it looks like something like:

Address | 0 1 2 3 | 4 5 6 7 | ...
Value   |  arr[0] |  arr[1] | ...
0
2

What you do is definitely not recommended in production code, but is definitely great for understanding pointers, casts, etc. in the learning process, so for this your example is great. So, why you get 2. It is because your array is an array of ints, which depending on your architecture has different size (in your case, sizeof(int) is 4). You define ptr as being a char pointer, char has size 1 byte. Pointer arithmetics (that's what you do when you write ptr+4) works with size of objects the pointer references, in your case with chars. Thus ptr+4 is 4 bytes away from the beginning of your array, and thus at the 2nd position of your int array. That is it. Try ptr+5, you should get 0.

2

On a 32 bit platform, int is four times the size of char. When you add 4 to ptr, you add 4 times the size of what ptr points to to ptr (which itself is a memory location). That happens to be the address of the second element in the int array.

On a 64 bit platform, int is eight times the size of char; and your output would be very different.

To cut a long story short, your code is not portable, (also see Joachim Pileborg's answer re endianness) but amusing to unpick.

1
1

Since you are coverting int* to char*, ptr[0] = 1, ptr[4] = 2, ptr[8] = 3, ptr[12] = 4 , ptr[16] = 5 and all others equal to 0. ptr+4 points to 4th element in the ptr array. So result is 2.

1
  • that depends on the endianness of your system. You didn't explain why it works like that and why it's correct on your machine.
    – Joe
    Jul 2, 2013 at 11:22
1
int main(){
 int arr[] = {1,2,3,4,5};
 char *ptr = (char *) arr;
 printf("%d",*(ptr+4));
 return 0;
}

Imagine arr is stored at the address 100 (totally dumb address). So you have: arr[0] is stored at the address 100. arr[1] is stored at the address 104. (there's is +4 because of the type int) arr[2] is stored at the address 108. arr[3] is stored at the address 112. Etc etc.

Now you're doing char *ptr = (char *) arr;, so ptr = 100 (the same as arr). The next statement is interesting, specially the second argument of printf : *(ptr+4). Keep in my mind that ptr = 100. So ptr + 4 = 104, the same address that arr[1] ! So it will print the value of arr[1], which is 2.

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