I've got an array of arrays, something like:

[
    [1,2,3],
    [1,2,3],
    [1,2,3],
]

I would like to transpose it to get the following array:

[
    [1,1,1],
    [2,2,2],
    [3,3,3],
]

It's not difficult to programmatically do so using loops:

function transposeArray(array, arrayLength){
    var newArray = [];
    for(var i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
        newArray.push([]);
    };

    for(var i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
        for(var j = 0; j < arrayLength; j++){
            newArray[j].push(array[i][j]);
        };
    };

    return newArray;
}

This, however, seems bulky, and I feel like there should be an easier way to do it. Is there?

  • 3
    Can you guarantee that the two dimensions will always be the same? 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, etc. What is the arrayLength parameter used for exactly? To ensure that you don't go beyond a certain number of elements in the array? – crush Jul 2 '13 at 14:45
  • 6
    This has nothing to do with JQuery, I changed the title. – Joe Jul 2 '13 at 14:47
  • 4
    Check this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/4492678/…. What you are doing is transposing a matrix – stackErr Jul 2 '13 at 14:48
  • 1
    Yes, transposing. Inverting would be completely different and I'm not interested in it. For now. – ckersch Jul 2 '13 at 14:59
  • 2
    The top left to bottom right diagonal is unchanged so there is an optimisation opportunity. – S Meaden Sep 8 '16 at 17:07

16 Answers 16

up vote 119 down vote accepted
array[0].map((col, i) => array.map(row => row[i]));

map calls a provided callback function once for each element in an array, in order, and constructs a new array from the results. callback is invoked only for indexes of the array which have assigned values; it is not invoked for indexes which have been deleted or which have never been assigned values.

callback is invoked with three arguments: the value of the element, the index of the element, and the Array object being traversed. [source]

  • 4
    This is a good solution. However, if you care about performance you should use OP's original solution (w/ the bug fix to support M x N arrays where M != N). check this jsPerf – Billy McKee Aug 4 '15 at 22:28
  • 2
    If you use it twice on the same array, it comes back to the first one intead of rotating 90' again – Olivier Pons Mar 3 '17 at 13:51
  • This didn't work for me. However, this did – zelusp Jul 18 '17 at 20:21
  • For array = [ [] ]; I would expect transpose() to act as an identity function and return [ [] ]. But instead it returns []. – Alex Aug 21 '17 at 13:40

You could use underscore.js

_.zip.apply(_, [[1,2,3], [1,2,3], [1,2,3]])
  • 3
    That was pretty - also, underscore is more necessary to me than jQuery is. – John Strickler Jul 2 '13 at 14:52
  • 1
    Ridiculously elegant solution, thanks for this. – henrebotha Feb 24 '17 at 9:54
  • or if you are using a functional library like rambda you can just do const transpose = apply(zip) – Guy Who Knows Stuff Apr 26 at 5:09
  • Why would this option be better than the selected answer? – Alex Lenail Jul 31 at 15:46
  • This question is years old and I'm not sure it is, now. It is, though, cleaner than the original version of the accepted answer. You'll notice that it's been edited substantially since. Looks like it uses ES6, which I don't think was available in 2013 when the question widely was asked. – Joe Jul 31 at 16:02

here is my implementation in modern browser (without dependency):

transpose = m => m[0].map((x,i) => m.map(x => x[i]))

shortest way with lodash/underscore and es6:

_.zip(...matrix)

where matrix could be:

const matrix = [[1,2,3], [1,2,3], [1,2,3]];
  • Or, without ES6: _.zip.apply(_, matrix) – ach Jul 29 '15 at 20:21
  • 7
    Close but _.unzip(matrix) is shorter ;) – Vigrant Mar 18 '16 at 7:21
  • 1
    Can you expand on this? I don't get what you're saying here. That short snipplet is supposed to solve the problem? or is it just a part or what? – Julix Sep 5 '16 at 9:00
  • @Julix The first snippet solve the problem. – marcel Sep 9 '16 at 15:27
  • 1
    my gosh that's a short solution. just learned about the ... operator - used it to break down a string into an array of letters... thanks for the reply – Julix Sep 9 '16 at 17:15

You can do it in in-place by doing only one pass:

function transpose(arr,arrLen) {
  for (var i = 0; i < arrLen; i++) {
    for (var j = 0; j <i; j++) {
      //swap element[i,j] and element[j,i]
      var temp = arr[i][j];
      arr[i][j] = arr[j][i];
      arr[j][i] = temp;
    }
  }
}
  • 1
    if your array is not a square (for example 2x8) this doesnt work I guess – Olivier Pons Mar 3 '17 at 13:54
  • 2
    This solution changes the original array. If you still need the original array then this solution might be not what you want. Other solutions create a new array instead. – Alex Aug 21 '17 at 13:43

Neat and pure:

[[0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5]].reduce((prev, next) => next.map((item, i) =>
    (prev[i] || []).concat(next[i])
), []); // [[0, 2, 4], [1, 3, 5]]

Previous solutions may lead to failure in case an empty array is provided.

Here it is as a function:

function transpose(array) {
    return array.reduce((prev, next) => next.map((item, i) =>
        (prev[i] || []).concat(next[i])
    ), []);
}

console.log(transpose([[0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5]]));

Update. It can be written even better with spread operator:

const transpose = matrix => matrix.reduce(($, row) =>
    row.map((_, i) => [...($[i] || []), row[i]]), 
    []
)

Just another variation using Array.map. Using indexes allows to transpose matrices where M != N:

// Get just the first row to iterate columns first
var t = matrix[0].map(function (col, c) {
    // For each column, iterate all rows
    return matrix.map(function (row, r) { 
        return matrix[r][c]; 
    }); 
});

All there is to transposing is mapping the elements column-first, and then by row.

Many good answers here! I consolidated them into one answer and updated some of the code for a more modern syntax:

One-liners inspired by Fawad Ghafoor and Óscar Gómez Alcañiz

function transpose(matrix) {
  return matrix[0].map((col, i) => matrix.map(row => row[i]));
}

function transpose(matrix) {
  return matrix[0].map((col, c) => matrix.map((row, r) => matrix[r][c]));
}

Functional approach style with reduce by Andrew Tatomyr

function transpose(matrix) {
  return matrix.reduce((prev, next) => next.map((item, i) =>
    (prev[i] || []).concat(next[i])
  ), []);
}

Lodash/Underscore by marcel

function tranpose(matrix) {
  return _.zip(...matrix);
}

// Without spread operator.
function transpose(matrix) {
  return _.zip.apply(_, [[1,2,3], [1,2,3], [1,2,3]])
}

Vanilla approach

function transpose(matrix) {
  const rows = matrix.length, cols = matrix[0].length;
  const grid = [];
  for (let j = 0; j < cols; j++) {
    grid[j] = Array(rows);
  }
  for (let i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
    for (let j = 0; j < cols; j++) {
      grid[j][i] = matrix[i][j];
    }
  }
  return grid;
}

Vanilla in-place ES6 approach inspired by Emanuel Saringan

function transpose(matrix) {
  for (var i = 0; i < matrix.length; i++) {
    for (var j = 0; j < i; j++) {
      const temp = matrix[i][j];
      matrix[i][j] = matrix[j][i];
      matrix[j][i] = temp;
    }
  }
}

// Using destructing
function transpose(matrix) {
  for (var i = 0; i < matrix.length; i++) {
    for (var j = 0; j < i; j++) {
      [matrix[i][j], matrix[j][i]] = [matrix[j][i], matrix[i][j]];
    }
  }
}

If you have an option of using Ramda JS and ES6 syntax, then here's another way to do it:

const transpose = a => R.map(c => R.map(r => r[c], a), R.keys(a[0]));

console.log(transpose([
  [1, 2, 3, 4],
  [5, 6, 7, 8],
  [9, 10, 11, 12]
])); // =>  [[1,5,9],[2,6,10],[3,7,11],[4,8,12]]
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/ramda/0.22.1/ramda.min.js"></script>

Edit: This answer would not transpose the matrix, but rotate it. I didn't read the question carefully in the first place :D

clockwise and counterclockwise rotation:

    function rotateCounterClockwise(a){
        var n=a.length;
        for (var i=0; i<n/2; i++) {
            for (var j=i; j<n-i-1; j++) {
                var tmp=a[i][j];
                a[i][j]=a[j][n-i-1];
                a[j][n-i-1]=a[n-i-1][n-j-1];
                a[n-i-1][n-j-1]=a[n-j-1][i];
                a[n-j-1][i]=tmp;
            }
        }
        return a;
    }

    function rotateClockwise(a) {
        var n=a.length;
        for (var i=0; i<n/2; i++) {
            for (var j=i; j<n-i-1; j++) {
                var tmp=a[i][j];
                a[i][j]=a[n-j-1][i];
                a[n-j-1][i]=a[n-i-1][n-j-1];
                a[n-i-1][n-j-1]=a[j][n-i-1];
                a[j][n-i-1]=tmp;
            }
        }
        return a;
    }
  • 2
    Thanks for the quick solution. – Zzap Mar 10 '17 at 13:59
  • 1
    Awesome.. works great – Michael K Aug 9 '17 at 0:00
  • Does not answer the question, though; Transposing is like ... mirroring along the diagonal (not rotating) – DerMike Oct 19 '17 at 13:18
  • @DerMike thanks for pointing out. I don't know why I made that mistake :) But at least I can see it has been useful for some other people. – Aryan Firouzian Oct 20 '17 at 10:06
  • 1
    @AryanFirouzyan, nice edit. :) – DerMike Oct 23 '17 at 7:38

If using RamdaJS is an option, this can be achieved in one line: R.transpose(myArray)

  • single-line solution/suggestion should be posted in comment. – Rumit Patel Feb 28 at 5:56
  • 1
    @Rumit where exactly did you get that idea from? – dcastro Feb 28 at 14:23
  • 1
    @Rumit and what made you think this is a comment and not an answer? – dcastro Feb 28 at 14:34
  • 1
    @Rumit so you're saying this is an answer, but should be posted as a comment and not as an answer? Do you see the flaw in your logic now? – dcastro Feb 28 at 14:42

You can achieve this without loops by using the following.

It looks very elegant and it does not require any dependencies such as jQuery of Underscore.js.

function transpose(matrix) {  
    return zeroFill(getMatrixWidth(matrix)).map(function(r, i) {
        return zeroFill(matrix.length).map(function(c, j) {
            return matrix[j][i];
        });
    });
}

function getMatrixWidth(matrix) {
    return matrix.reduce(function (result, row) {
        return Math.max(result, row.length);
    }, 0);
}

function zeroFill(n) {
    return new Array(n+1).join('0').split('').map(Number);
}

Minified

function transpose(m){return zeroFill(m.reduce(function(m,r){return Math.max(m,r.length)},0)).map(function(r,i){return zeroFill(m.length).map(function(c,j){return m[j][i]})})}function zeroFill(n){return new Array(n+1).join("0").split("").map(Number)}

Here is a demo I threw together. Notice the lack of loops :-)

// Create a 5 row, by 9 column matrix.
var m = CoordinateMatrix(5, 9);

// Make the matrix an irregular shape.
m[2] = m[2].slice(0, 5);
m[4].pop();

// Transpose and print the matrix.
println(formatMatrix(transpose(m)));

function Matrix(rows, cols, defaultVal) {
    return AbstractMatrix(rows, cols, function(r, i) {
        return arrayFill(cols, defaultVal);
    });
}
function ZeroMatrix(rows, cols) {
    return AbstractMatrix(rows, cols, function(r, i) {
        return zeroFill(cols);
    });
}
function CoordinateMatrix(rows, cols) {
    return AbstractMatrix(rows, cols, function(r, i) {
        return zeroFill(cols).map(function(c, j) {
            return [i, j];
        });
    });
}
function AbstractMatrix(rows, cols, rowFn) {
    return zeroFill(rows).map(function(r, i) {
        return rowFn(r, i);
    });
}
/** Matrix functions. */
function formatMatrix(matrix) {
    return matrix.reduce(function (result, row) {
        return result + row.join('\t') + '\n';
    }, '');
}
function copy(matrix) {  
    return zeroFill(matrix.length).map(function(r, i) {
        return zeroFill(getMatrixWidth(matrix)).map(function(c, j) {
            return matrix[i][j];
        });
    });
}
function transpose(matrix) {  
    return zeroFill(getMatrixWidth(matrix)).map(function(r, i) {
        return zeroFill(matrix.length).map(function(c, j) {
            return matrix[j][i];
        });
    });
}
function getMatrixWidth(matrix) {
    return matrix.reduce(function (result, row) {
        return Math.max(result, row.length);
    }, 0);
}
/** Array fill functions. */
function zeroFill(n) {
  return new Array(n+1).join('0').split('').map(Number);
}
function arrayFill(n, defaultValue) {
    return zeroFill(n).map(function(value) {
        return defaultValue || value;
    });
}
/** Print functions. */
function print(str) {
    str = Array.isArray(str) ? str.join(' ') : str;
    return document.getElementById('out').innerHTML += str || '';
}
function println(str) {
    print.call(null, [].slice.call(arguments, 0).concat(['<br />']));
}
#out {
    white-space: pre;
}
<div id="out"></div>

  • Why would you not want to do it without loops? Without loops it's slow – Downgoat Jul 11 '16 at 0:31
  • 5
    Isn't .map a loop? Just one you don't see? I mean it's going over every of the inputs and does stuff to it... – Julix Sep 5 '16 at 8:59

ES6 1liners as :

let invert = a => a[0].map((col, c) => a.map((row, r) => a[r][c]))

so same as Óscar's, but as would you rather rotate it clockwise :

let rotate = a => a[0].map((col, c) => a.map((row, r) => a[r][c]).reverse())

I found the above answers either hard to read or too verbose, so I write one myself. And I think this is most intuitive way to implement transpose in linear algebra, you don't do value exchange, but just insert each element into the right place in the new matrix:

function transpose(matrix) {
  const rows = matrix.length
  const cols = matrix[0].length

  let grid = []
  for (let col = 0; col < cols; col++) {
    grid[col] = []
  }
  for (let row = 0; row < rows; row++) {
    for (let col = 0; col < cols; col++) {
      grid[col][row] = matrix[row][col]
    }
  }
  return grid
}
function invertArray(array,arrayWidth,arrayHeight) {
  var newArray = [];
  for (x=0;x<arrayWidth;x++) {
    newArray[x] = [];
    for (y=0;y<arrayHeight;y++) {
        newArray[x][y] = array[y][x];
    }
  }
  return newArray;
}

I think this is slightly more readable. It uses Array.from and logic is identical to using nested loops:

var arr = [
  [1, 2, 3, 4],
  [1, 2, 3, 4],
  [1, 2, 3, 4]
];

/*
 * arr[0].length = 4 = number of result rows
 * arr.length = 3 = number of result cols
 */

var result = Array.from({ length: arr[0].length }, function(x, row) {
  return Array.from({ length: arr.length }, function(x, col) {
    return arr[col][row];
  });
});

console.log(result);

If you are dealing with arrays of unequal length you need to replace arr[0].length with something else:

var arr = [
  [1, 2],
  [1, 2, 3],
  [1, 2, 3, 4]
];

/*
 * arr[0].length = 4 = number of result rows
 * arr.length = 3 = number of result cols
 */

var result = Array.from({ length: arr.reduce(function(max, item) { return item.length > max ? item.length : max; }, 0) }, function(x, row) {
  return Array.from({ length: arr.length }, function(x, col) {
    return arr[col][row];
  });
});

console.log(result);

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