14

I have a method in a class that looks like this;

class SomeClass {
    private $hidden = array(....);

    /**
     * @return array - numeric indexed array in order of $this->hidden.
     * Suitable for use by list(var1, var2, ...)
     */
    public function getAsList($list = array())
    {
       return array_values(array_intersect_key($this->hidden, array_flip($list) );
    }

But this is not useful, since the caller of the method does not know the order of the key/element pairs in the associative array in instance variable $hidden. Ideally, the returned array would be in the exact same order as the keys specified in $list. For example:

$foo = new SomeClass();
list($foo, $bar, $baz) = $foo->getAsList(array('foo', 'bar', 'baz');

I can easily write some explicit, verbose PHP code in a loop to do this, but is there some clever way to use the various array functions, e.g. array_multisort() to spit this out in minimal lines of code (and hopefully, at compiled code speed -- I'll test it, if it matters).

In a sense, this is a brain teaser to which I don't yet know the answer. It's not critical I do it without an explicit loop, but I'm curious as to if it can be done. I spent 30 or so minutes on it, and haven't found a solution yet.

2
  • 1
    +1 cause i like the question, but i also want to make sure you're aware of extract().
    – goat
    Jul 3, 2013 at 1:45
  • I know about extract(). I am trying explicitly to avoid it in my class which has this method, as it's easy to cause security problems if extract() is used wrongly. Also, I've discovered that explicitly creating my named variables is actually faster than extract() for some reason -- at least in my small set of benchmarks.
    – CXJ
    Jul 3, 2013 at 2:03

2 Answers 2

18

Perhaps array_replace is the missing piece to your puzzle:

public function getAsList($list = array())
{
  $klist = array_flip($list);
  return array_values(array_intersect_key(array_replace($klist, $this->hidden), $klist));
}

Example (Demo):

$hidden = [
  'apples' => 19,
  'eggs' => 7,
  'grapes' => 144,
  'mushrooms' => 3,
  'oranges' => 16
];

$list = ['grapes', 'apples', 'eggs', 'oranges'];

$klist = array_flip($list);
print_r(array_values(array_intersect_key(array_replace($klist, $hidden), $klist)));

/*
Array
(
    [0] => 144
    [1] => 19
    [2] => 7
    [3] => 16
)
*/
2

This is one of those cases when functional programming pales in comparison to a language construct in terms of readability, maintanability, and efficiency.

I have a bias toward functional programming, but in this case it just doesn't pay.

Code: (Demo)

$hidden = [
  'apples' => 19,
  'eggs' => 7,
  'grapes' => 144,
  'mushrooms' => 3,
  'oranges' => 16
];

$list = ['grapes', 'apples', 'eggs', 'oranges'];
foreach ($list as $item) {
    if (isset($hidden[$item])) {
        $result[] = $hidden[$item];
    }
}

var_export($result);

Output:

array (
  0 => 144,
  1 => 19,
  2 => 7,
  3 => 16,
)

If you insist on using functional programming, then it would be most efficient to perform the required operations in this order:

  • filter the array
  • order the keys of the filtered array
  • reindex the ordered, filtered array

Here is how:

Code: (Demo)

$flippedList = array_flip($list);
var_export(array_values(array_replace($flippedList, array_intersect_key($hidden, $flippedList))));

(same output as previous snippet)

Logically, it doesn't make sense to order an array that has excess elements in it. Lighten the load, first.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.