3

The following code is supposed to output 6, but instead it outputs 5. I can't figure out why. What's going on?

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
void foo(T& y)
{
   y++;
}

int main()
{
   int x = 5;

   // Why won't this line work???/
   foo(x);

   std::cout << x;
}

Live demo

  • 7
    @LightnessRacesinOrbit If you already knew the answer, why didn't you answer your own question? – Dukeling Jul 3 '13 at 8:24
  • 8
    This is basically a glorified bug report for the pretty printer syntax highlighter...? (Not sure whether to +1 or -1.) – Kerrek SB Jul 3 '13 at 8:25
  • 3
    @LightnessRacesinOrbit: Maybe this should be called a "smug report". – Kerrek SB Jul 3 '13 at 8:26
  • 5
    This question appears to be off-topic because it is just a joke. See stackoverflow.com/revisions/… – johnchen902 Jul 3 '13 at 8:35
  • 3
    @johnchen902: It's not a joke if someone learns from it. In fact, it's no more a joke than a self-answered Q&A... that I didn't post an A doesn't change that. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Jul 3 '13 at 8:39
21

Trigraphs

You're using the good ol' trick of trigraphs.

// Why won't this line work???/
                            | |
                            \ /
                             |
                         ~trigraph~

The ??/ trigraph is in turn converted to \ which basically concatenates the current line with the next line and thus your code becomes more or less like this:

// Why won't this line work? foo(x);

A fine trick indeed.


Quoting from the C++11 standard:

§2.2.2:

Each instance of a backslash character (\) immediately followed by a new-line character is deleted, splicing physical source lines to form logical source lines. ...

§2.4.1:

Table 1 - Trigraph sequences
...
==========================
| Trigraph | Replacement |
==========================
|          ...           |
==========================
|   ??/    |      \      |
==========================

Fortunately, GCC seems to detect this kind of trickery, emitting a warning (just set -Wall):

main.cpp:13:32: warning: trigraph ??/ converted to \ [-Wtrigraphs]
    // Why won't this line work???/
 ^

main.cpp:13:4: warning: multi-line comment [-Wcomment]
    // Why won't this line work???/
    ^

Related references:

meaning of `???-` in C++ code

What is this smiley-with-beard expression: "<:]{%>"?

What does the C ??!??! operator do?

And all other similar questions out there. ??)

PS: That's a smiley.

  • 2
    Oh! What an interesting and neat feature. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Jul 3 '13 at 8:19
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit Interesting? Yes! Neat? No! Useful? Absolutely Not! When do they finally drop rubbish like that from the standard (together with the literal versions of the logical operators). Show me a single person that needs those nowadays for more than just "party knowledge" (or maybe entries to a hypothetical IOC++CC). – Chris says Reinstate Monica Jul 3 '13 at 9:39
  • 1
    @ChristianRau that's some party... – Sam Holder Jul 3 '13 at 16:12
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit you make out like you didn't know very convincingly. I'd like to see the programmer that writes a comment // Why won't this line work???/ before a line that they haven't tested yet. That must be a very pessimistic person... – Sam Holder Jul 3 '13 at 16:14
8

??/ is a Trigraph sequence which is replaced with \.
For the compiler \ means that immediate line that follows is a part of the current line. In this case the current line is a comment. The effective result is:

// Why won't this line work foo(x);
  • Oh! You're right! (BTW, 99.9k.. nice) – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Jul 3 '13 at 8:21
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit: We both know that you knew it already & you are just trolling ;-) Ah, I missed the moment though shows 100k already, not that I am complaining. – Alok Save Jul 3 '13 at 8:34
  • @AlokSave Congrats for your 100k RP – Grijesh Chauhan Jul 3 '13 at 10:44
  • @GrijeshChauhan: Thank you :) – Alok Save Jul 3 '13 at 11:24
4

It's Trigraphs. In c++11 specification

2.4 Trigraph sequences [lex.trigraph]

1 Before any other processing takes place, each occurrence of one of the following sequences of three characters (“trigraph sequences”) is replaced by the single character indicated in Table 1.

                     Table 1 — Trigraph sequences
    Trigraph Replacement │ Trigraph Replacement │ Trigraph Replacement
    ─────────────────────┼──────────────────────┼─────────────────────
       ??=      #        │    ??(      [        │    ??<      {
       ??/      \        │    ??)      ]        │    ??>      }
       ??’      ˆ        │    ??!      |        │    ??-      ~

Now replace ??/ with \ and you'll find out.

2
// Why won't this line work???/
   foo(x);

The trigraph ??/turns to \, so the code will be translated to:

// Why won't this line work?\
   foo(x);

And string concatenation works.

When I tested it in g++, trigraph is turned off by default(generates a warning), it will output 6. If compiled using g++ t.cpp -trigraphs, will output 5.

2

probably your comment is interpreted as a trigraph (not treegraph!) that "deletes" the function call.

http://ideone.com/sU4YGc works for me deleting that ??/ in the comment.

// Why won't this line work?
foo(x);

see also Purpose of Trigraph sequences in C++?

  • 2
    Well. Is a tree a graph. Mmm. Some graphs can be a forest.... Mmm. I'm lost – sehe Jul 3 '13 at 8:35
  • ehehe, just mispelled tri for tree. – DRC Jul 3 '13 at 8:42
1

The compiler is your friend. This

   // Why won't this line work???/
   foo(x);

is a multiline comment, foo(x) is not executed!

The trigraph "??/" is converted to "\" which indicates a linebreak into the comment.

  • What does the / do? – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Jul 3 '13 at 8:25
  • it converts to \ when it follows ??. Trigraphs used in c and c++ can be found at: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digraphs_and_trigraphs – Stefano Falasca Jul 3 '13 at 8:27
  • @StefanoFalasca you have a strange and roundabout way of arriving at the point. And your explanation is ... slightly misleading. '/' is not converted to '\\' when it follows anything. '??/' is seen by the compiler as '\\' iff trigraphs are enabled. (Urffff. F*cken comment markdown) – sehe Jul 3 '13 at 8:33
  • 3
    actually, the trigraph ??/ doesn't even get to the compiler, the substitution is made by the preprocessor – Stefano Falasca Jul 3 '13 at 8:41
  • 1
    @StefanoFalasca precisely what I said. The compiler sees a '/' – sehe Jul 3 '13 at 8:45

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