25

The following Java code does not compile.

int a = 0;

if(a == 1) {
    int b = 0;
}

if(a == 1) {
    b = 1;
}

Why? There can be no code path leading to the program assigning 1 to b without declaring it first.

It occurred to me that b's variable scope might be limited to the first if statement, but then I wouldn't understand why. What if I really don't want to declare b needlessly, in order to improve performance? I don't like having variables left unused after declaration.

(You may want to argue than I could simply declare b in the second if statement, in that case, just imagine that it could be in a loop somewhere else.)

5
  • because b has declared in first if block and inaccessible out of the block, declare the b with a
    – user2511414
    Jul 3, 2013 at 9:13
  • 1
    What occurred to you is right. Your variable b is only in scope for that particular curly brackets.
    – Thihara
    Jul 3, 2013 at 9:13
  • Please read the WHOLE explanation.
    – Aeronth
    Jul 3, 2013 at 9:15
  • Its worth noting that if the result on b in one if is completely seperate from the b in the other if then they are different 'b's, just called the same, declaring them twice is the correct thing to do. If b has some longer term usage then declare it before the first if (just below int a=0;) Jul 3, 2013 at 9:24
  • What if the if-conditions were different, so the program never entered the first if statement (and so b was never declared) then the program did enter the second if statement and tried to use the undeclared b: bad things happen Jul 3, 2013 at 9:30

13 Answers 13

34

Variables can be declared inside a conditional statement. However you try and access b in a different scope.

When you declare b here:

if(a == 1) {
    int b = 0;
}

It is only in scope until the end }.

Therefore when you come to this line:

b = 1;

b does not exist.

1
  • Is there a best practice regarding this? I saw that people are declaring variables on different places in the code. Is it convenient to declare things before statements if the situation allows?
    – quant
    Apr 5, 2019 at 14:40
12

Why? There can be no code path leading to the program assigning 1 to b without declaring it first.

You are right, but the compiler doesn't know that. The compiler does not execute the code. The compiler only translates to bytecode without evaluating expressions.

2
  • I was trying below code without using braces in if statement, but code does not compile. if(a) int b=0; Is this because declaration and initialization is in fact a two step process and without braces, only one statement is applicable to if statement?
    – Rajesh
    Jun 17, 2019 at 14:46
  • @Rajesh No, it does not work because declaring a variable in an if statement without braces is futile. There is no place the variable can be used. It immediately falls out of scope when the if is over.
    – TomWolk
    Jun 21, 2019 at 3:20
6

This { } defines a block scope. Anything declared between {} is local to that block. That means that you can't use them outside of the block. However Java disallows hiding a name in the outer block by a name in the inner one. This is what JLS says :

The scope of a local variable declaration in a block (§14.2) is the rest of the block in which the declaration appears, starting with its own initializer (§14.4) and including any further declarators to the right in the local variable declaration statement.

The name of a local variable v may not be redeclared as a local variable of the directly enclosing method, constructor or initializer block within the scope of v, or a compile-time error occurs.

4

Its all about java variable scoping.

You'll need to define the variable outside of the if statement to be able to use it outside.

int a = 0;
int b = 0;

if(a == 1) {
    b = 1;
}

if(a == 1) {
    b = 2;
}

See Blocks and Statements

2

It is a local variable and is limited to the {} scope.

Try this here.

2

you have declared b variable inside if block that is not accessible out side the if block and if you want to access then put outside if block

2

The scope of b is the block it is declared in, that is, the first if. Why is that so? Because this scoping rule (lexical scoping) is easy to understand, easy to implement, and follows the principle of least surprise.

If b were to be visible in the second if:

  • the compiler would have to infer equivalent if branches and merge them to a single scope (hard to implement);
  • changing a condition in a random if statement would potentially make some variables visible and others hidden (hard to understand and source of surprising bugs).

No sane language has such a complicated scoping rule.

w.r.t. performance - declaring an extra variable has a negligible impact on performance. Trust the compiler! It will allocate registers efficiently.

2
  • Matlab does have this sort of scoping rule i'm afraid, its hellish. (its also dynamic which is why it can cope with this madness in the first place). Ah you said "no sane language", fair enough, i retract my comment Jul 3, 2013 at 9:27
  • Yes, I said "sane" ;) I wasn't aware of this Matlab madness, though. Jul 3, 2013 at 9:29
1

Because when b goes out of scope in the first if (a == 1) then it will be removed and no longer exists on the stack and therefore can not be used in the next if statement.

1

{ } is used to define scope of variables.And here you declared :

if(a == 1) 
{
    int b = 0;
}

So here scope of b will be only in { }.So you are using variable b outside { }, it is giving compilation error.

You can also refer this:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/variables.html

1

If you re declaring variable inside a block then the limitation of the variable limits to the particular block in which it got declared.

NOTE : Only static variables has access from anywhere in the program.

In you code :

int a = 0;

if(a == 1) {
    int b = 0;
}

if(a == 1) {
    b = 1;
}

variable 'a' can be accessed in any if statement as its declare outside the block but, variable 'b' is declare inside if hence limited its use outside the block.

If you want to use 'b' outside the if statement you have to declare it where you have declare variable 'a'.

1
int a = 0;

if(a == 1) {
int b = 0; // this int b is only visible within this if statement only(Scope)
}

if(a == 1) {
b = 1; // here b can't be identify
}

you have to do following way to make correct the error

    int a = 0;
    int b = 0;
    if(a == 1) {
       b=0;
    }
    if(a == 1) {
        b = 1;
    }
1

Just for completeness sake: this one works as well (explanation is scoping, see the other answers)

int a = 0;

if(a == 1) {
    int b = 0;
}

if(a == 1) {
    int b = 1;
}

Due to scoping, b will only be accessible inside the if statements. What we have here are actually two variables, each of which is just accessible in their scope.

0

variable b's scope is only until the if block completes, as this is where you declared the variable. That is why it cannot be accessed on the following block. This is for memory allocation, otherwise they would be ALOT of variables floating around in the memory.

int a = 0;

if(a == 1) {
   int b = 0;    
} //b scope ends here

if(a == 1) {
    b = 1; //compiler error
}

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